Question about Delta 16955-SSSD Stainless Steel Victorian Single Handle Kitchen 16955-SSSD

1 Answer

Swing arm too loose

The swing arm on my 19655 ssd swings to freely, would like more resistance.

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  • gag11 Mar 11, 2009

    I should add that the faucet is brand new its not worn.

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What I have doen in the past is to take the compression nut off. Wrap teflon plumbing thread tape around and between the two o rings and tinghened the compression nut back down,tightening the worn swing arm joint.

Posted on Mar 11, 2009

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How to fix a flush valve


  • Most toilet tank troubles can be traced to a faulty flush valve. You have three choices in correcting this common problem: (1) repair the old flush valve; (2) replace the flush ball with a more modern flapper or install a glued-in replacement flapper; (3) or install a new flush valve.

  • These repairs require a varying amount of work. The more simple adjustments were discussed previously.

  • Examine the old flush ball or flapper. If it is aged or encrusted with deposits, replace it with a new one. Scale deposits on the seat can be removed with steel wool or with No. 500 wet-or-dry abrasive paper. But if the valve still leaks, it must be replaced.

  • You can install a new guide arm, if necessary. To remove the lift wire from a flush ball, turn it counterclockwise with pliers. If you are replacing all parts, simply cut off the old lift wire.

  • Flapper. To replace a flapper, disconnect the lift hardware from the trip arm and slide the flapper up and off the overflow pipe. Install the new unit, reversing directions, and connect the lift hardware back to the trip arm. Any excess lift chain can be cut off or left dangling, if it doesn't interfere with toilet operation.

  • A loose trip handle can be fixed by tightening. The nut has left-hand threads, and must be turned counterclockwise to tighten (looking from inside the tank). Or, you can install a replacement trip handle.

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  • On single-piece toilet tanks–with a flush valve held in place with flanges that fit inside the opening–the flapper-ball may bind and prevent a leak-proof seal. On more common two-piece toilets, this problem does not occur.

  • Using a glue-in repair kit is quick and easy, but you must follow the manufacturer's instructions. To be sure you purchase the right kind of repair kit, take a rough drawing of the bottom of your toilet tank and flush valve to your hardware or home center store.

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How to adjust a toilet


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  • The lifting hardware on a flapper-type flush valve should raise the rubber flapper to start a flush, but should not hold the flapper up off its seat. If this is occurring, the hardware is adjusted too short. Some types allow you to slide the flapper itself up or down on the refill tube to ensure that the flapper meets the valve seat squarely. The lifting hardware and flapper height adjustments are the first things to check when flapper problems arise.

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  • Cartridge faucets have only one moving part. The stem slides up and down to open and close the faucet and rotates to regulate the flow of hot and cold water. Any leaking requires replacement of the cartridge.

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    on Jan 16, 2010 | Drains

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