Question about JVC GZ-MG330 HDD Camcorder

1 Answer

I have a UK camcorder but want to produce DVD's for the US market

I've bought a UK camcorder which obviously uses PAL but I'm going to be selling DVDs in the NTSC format.

When I used the software provided by the camcorder - Power Director and rendered it in NTSC I got a warning that it would convert it but I would loose quality. Is this significant?

Or do I have to purchase a camcorder from the US and get an adapter but will that be ok with a UK laptop?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 8 Answers

Try the software with the camera first, if you do loose significant quality, go and download one the numerous free video converters.

p.s. here is a good website as well
http://www.videohelp.com/convert

Posted on Mar 11, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I just bought a series of movies from the UK and found out about this whole regions thing. I have a Sylvania sdvd4101c an do can't figure out how to unlock it. Help!


Your trouble may not end at the region of the DVD player. There's the issue of format. There is NTSC (USA), PAL (UK) and a lesser used SECAM format. These are NOT interchangeable unless the player supports it. See this link for more:

What is the difference between PAL NTSC and SECAM

Many players can have the region changed. Most however, are computer drives. Home audio equipment can be tricky - and you might want to have a look here first:

Playing UK region 2 DVDs on American region 1 DVD players


Some players allow you to make several changes and that's all, or allow you to set to "Region Free" (which is ideal).

Feb 27, 2015 | Sylvania Televison & Video

2 Answers

I have just purchased a new Panasonic DMP-BD75 DVD/Blue Ray player locally. I was assured that it was multi-regional for DVDs (as required by Australia's trade laws). However, it will only play...


Hi, some times regional codes does not work all the time..But it's worth trying..

The DVD world is divided into six major geographical regions, with two additional regions reserved for specialized use.

To keep it simple, this means that DVD players and DVDs are labeled for operation on within a specific geographical region in the world. For example, the U.S. is in region 1. This means that all DVD players sold in the U.S. are made to region 1 specifications. As a result, region 1 players can only play region 1 discs. That's right, the DVDs themselves are encoded for a specific region. On the back of each DVD package, you will a find a region number (1 thru 6).

The geographical regions are as follows:

REGION 1 -- USA, Canada
REGION 2 -- Japan, Europe, South Africa, Middle East, Greenland
REGION 3 -- S.Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Parts of South East Asia
REGION 4 -- Australia, New Zealand, Latin America (including Mexico)
REGION 5 -- Eastern Europe, Russia, India, Africa
REGION 6 -- China
REGION 7 -- Reserved for Unspecified Special Use
REGION 8 -- Reserved for Cruise Ships, Airlines, etc...
REGION 0 or REGION ALL -- Discs are uncoded and can be played Worldwide, however, PAL discs must be played in a PAL-compatible unit and NTSC discs must be played in an NTSC-compatible unit.

The end result is that DVDs encoded for regions other than Region 1 cannot be played on a region 1 DVD player, also, players marketed for other regions cannot play region 1-stamped DVDs.

The Reasons For DVD Region Coding

Why does DVD region coding exist, you ask? According to what the public is being told, such coding is a tool to protect copyright and film distribution rights (in other words, movie studio profits).

Movies are released in theaters in different parts of the world at different times throughout the year. That Summer blockbuster in the U.S. may end up being the Christmas blockbuster overseas. If that occurs, the DVD version of the movie may be out in the U.S. while it is still showing in theaters overseas.

In order to preserve the financial integrity of the theatrical distribution of a particular film, it is not possible (under normal conditions) to have a friend in the U.S. send a DVD copy of the film to the country where it is in theatrical release and be able to play the DVD on a player there.

Region Coding - The Good and The Bad

Depending on who you are, region coding can be considered a blessing or a curse. If you are movie studio executive, this is great, not only do you reap maximum profits from the theatrical releases, but also from the DVD releases for your film. However, if you are a consumer wanting to see a movie that is available on DVD in your relative's or friend's country but not in yours, you may have to wait quite a while.

However, another suspected rationale for region coding is beginning to emerge, possible price-fixing of DVDs depending on region. Although this is yet to be legally proven in court, if proven to be true, Australian and European courts may just put the heat on Hollywood and manufacturers to discontinue region coding as a marketing practice. New Zealand has been trying to eliminate DVD region code restrictions in that country.

In addition, for those consumers that live in Europe, Australia, and Asia, there is an abundant market for so-called Code Free DVD players, which are essentially modified versions of stock DVD players in which the region coding function has been disabled.

With the magic of mail-order and the Internet, these players are widely available, even if not totally legal. For the fortunate owners of these players, DVDs can be purchased from any region.

However, as a reaction to the popularity of Code-Free DVD players, "Hollywood" has instituted another layer of coding on region1 DVDs called RCE (Regional Coding Enhancement) which prevents selected region1 DVDs from playing even on Code-Free DVD players. However, RCE is only implemented on some Region 1 discs, and not on discs from other regions.

The NTSC/PAL Factor

There is additional hitch in this madness. Since the world is also divided into the NTSC and PAL video systems, as outlined in my previous article: Who's Your PAL? ), the consumer may need a multi-system TV to access DVDs pressed in one of these systems. Although this is difficult in the U.S. market, where all video is based on the NTSC system, most consumers in Europe and some other parts of the world do own Televisions that can view DVDs pressed in either NTSC or PAL.

DVD Price Fixing and Movie Release Dates

I can see the need for some region coding in order to protect movie release dates, but if issues such as price-fixing of DVD product is also involved, Hollywood may end up being in deep trouble on this one.

With the increase in communication and travel, information and entertainment can be accessed just about anywhere at anytime and perhaps Hollywood would best be served by releasing films and videos at the same time everywhere. Not only would consumers be better served, but the cost of region coding and the need for the aftermarket Code-Free DVD player would be eliminated.

The Consumer Impatience Factor

Also, I realize it's nice to purchase the DVD version of the latest blockbuster just six months after theatrical release. It is a minor inconvenience to wait another month or so if it means the film is still in theatrical release somewhere else in the world. If the movie is worthy, fans will wait for the DVD. I doubt if the sales of blockbuster DVD releases, such as Star Wars: Episode II, Lord Of The Rings, etc... suffer because we had to wait over a year to get it. I, for one, will always be in line for those major DVD releases.

The Real Beneficiaries Of DVD Region Coding

The only entities that seem to be really benefiting from DVD Region Coding are the movie studios and the marketers of Code-Free DVD players. Under this current system, my vote is for the marketers of the Code-Free players. Even the International Space Station has Code-Free DVD players (for obvious practical reasons).

For a list of dealers that sell modified Code-Free DVD players, check the listings in the linkboxes below this article of (Guide Note: The dealer listings are purely informational, I do not vouch for the quality of the products and services offered).

Home DVD Recording

With the advent of DVD Recorders and DVD Camcorders for consumer use, the question comes up as to how this is affected by DVD Region Coding. The good news is that since DVD Region Coding is a commercial application, any DVD recordings you make on a consumer-based DVD recorder, DVD camcorder, or even a PC, are not Region Coded. If the DVD you record made in the NTSC video system, it will be playable on DVD players in countries that use that system, and the same for PAL; there is no further region code restriction on home recorded DVDs.

For additional information on consumer DVD recording, check out my DVD Recorder FAQs

However, if you choose to implement Region Coding on your own DVD recordings, you need access to software or a service that is able to implement the region code designation.

Good luck to you...please pass your comment when your done ..

Apr 30, 2011 | Panasonic Televison & Video

1 Answer

I recently bought some dvds from the UK. JVC XV-S65 dvd player will not play them. It reads 'region error' everytime I try to play the discs. HELP!


The dvds discs u bought from the UK is play on only the DVD player that play PAL signal format. Where u live Canada,US or Mexico?DVD players in these countries.It play only NTSC signal format.U can't change DVD players regions format,only can a DVD players that have regions free to play all DVDs discs of the world.

Feb 02, 2011 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Unlock dvd regional code


This is a major problem, UK use PAL and have for years now, DVD's that are not made for PAL will not work either.

Jul 05, 2010 | Canon DC310 DVD Camcorder

1 Answer

Won't play Region 2 PAL dvds


Here is the code..

1. Power on
2. Tray open
3. Push MENU
4. Push 8888
5. Push Display
6. Push in desired region 0-6, (0 is ALL REGION )
7. POWER OFF
8. REGIONFREE!!

Jay

May 20, 2009 | Coby DVD-257

1 Answer

Philips dvd 3445h doesn't seem to support pal format


You would have to either convert the DVDs to NTSC by ripping them to your computer and using conversion software, or you need to get a player that supports PAL and NTSC. Phillips has players that do both NTSC and PAL but it sounds like the one you have doesn't.
I have a Phillips DVP 5140 that does PAL and NTSC and is region unlocked.
There are other players on the market that do support it, but you will have to look around a bit.

Best of luck

Jan 04, 2009 | Philips Televison & Video

2 Answers

Overseas dvd playing in black & white instead of colour


Hi

Your DVD is in Pal mode change the system settings Thanks@!

Nov 27, 2008 | Panasonic DMR-EH57 HDD Recorder Player

1 Answer

Spectroniq PDV-768


uk dvds are formatted in PAL
us dvds are NTSC
find your settings screen (usually has a wrench to identify it)

Nov 02, 2008 | Spectroniq Protron 7'' TFT LCD Portable...

1 Answer

DVDs in PAL format


Hey LauraJPL,

Because PAL-format and Region 2 DVD's are primarily used in Europe, they generally will not be sold through Best Buy™ stores located within the United States or Canada. While U.S. and Canadian stores may sell some multi-region or region-free DVD's, the vast majority of the titles offered will be Region 1 NTSC-format discs.

Hope this helps you out.

Sincerely,
Aaron
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Jun 23, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Jvcgzmg130u


yes....BUT....You'll need your computer to convert first. Although this is the US version camorder that you purchased, the software that comes with the camcorder allows you to convert you recording from NTSC to PAL when your ready to produce your movie. You can do this by opening up Power Produce or Power Director(software that comes with you camcorder) on you computer transfering you movie(s), editing if you would like though you dont have to, then select produce movie. The options offer you what choices on what to create; file, dvd,youtube video, and so on. You'll also see an option to produce in NTSC (default) or PAL. This is the only way that your recordings can become compadable with and be shown IN color on you PAL devices. If this isnt done and you go srait to your PAL recorder with this camcorder, our movies will be shown in black and white and or a bit distorted with no sound.


c9ee7e3.jpgDONT FORGET TO RATE!!!

Nov 06, 2007 | JVC Everio GZ-MG130 Camcorder

Not finding what you are looking for?
JVC GZ-MG330 HDD Camcorder Logo

111 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top JVC Video Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

Larry Stiles
Larry Stiles

Level 2 Expert

286 Answers

sonic boom...
sonic boom...

Level 3 Expert

1557 Answers

Are you a JVC Video Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...