Question about Fuji Cycling

Open Question

1999 fuji mx480 rear wheel rubbing

1999 fuji mx480 purchased new, since new, rear tire has rubbed on frame by chain. Tire does not rub between frame by seat. I brought it back to sports auth where I purchased the bike. they were not able to fix this and suggested to run the back tire under inflated a bit which did help some. I have disassembled the rear hub to repack the bearings and notice that the axle is set closer to the chain side where it is rubbing with a larger bushing on the opposite side holding the wheel closer to the chain side. My question: can I position the hub further to the right as I have about 2 mm left in the drop out on the rubbing side and add a washer (spacer) or is this a much bigger problem? side issue, when I removed the bearings, there were 9 on the gear cog side and 10 on the other side. Is this correct for this bike or is it possible that an extra was dropped into hub and did not end up where they are supposed to be? thanks Donn

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

countrysi248
  • 443 Answers

SOURCE: front driver side tire makes loud rubbing noise when moving

two items might be your problem the CV joint is bad or your front bearing is going out .. thanks Jerry

Posted on Jan 28, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: freewheel on Mavic SSC-SL turns with tire/wheel rotation

Not sure if you ever got a response. I can help with half the issue. These Mavic SSC-SL wheels are a breeze to disassemble the rear hub (I've done so many times). I have these wheels on road bikes AND cross bikes. You DON'T need (nor want to use a vise). Yes, the one side is a 5 mm allen key. While the other side seems like it has nothing, you can actually (with your hand) simply grab the black axle and pull it away/off the hub. It will be a bit stubborn, but trust me, it comes off. There is an O-ring on the inside that simply keeps it sealed and on. Once you have that part off, you now insert a 10 mm allen key. With the 5mm in the other side, you can now twist and remove the entire axle and freehub. Careful, the freehub will now come off the axle, exposing the seals, a washer, AND 2 pawls that are in place by springs. Be careful not to lose the springs.

There's not much to it. Now simply inspect, lube and reassemble. Btw, this is also how you change your wheel from a Shimano hub to a campy hub.

Hope that helps.

Regards,
Corey

Posted on Mar 01, 2009

OneRide
  • 379 Answers

SOURCE: 93 FXR Rear tire rubs belt guard w/axle centered.

Bike was wrecked? Sounds to me like the frame and/or swingarm is bent.

Posted on Jun 11, 2009

KTMEXC250
  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: sounds like tire rub when turning right or left

It may be your power steering. Try checking the level of the power steering fluid. If you are not familiar with where this is check your owners manual and it will definitely tell you where it's located under the hood. If the fluid is at a good level it is most likely something to do with your wheel alignment. This can only be checked and serviced by a licenced motor mechanic or specialist alignment centre.

Good luck

Posted on Nov 11, 2009

dunnbiker
  • 8546 Answers

SOURCE: Back tire replacement

Before doing anything else, loosen the rear wheel and make sure the axle is fully seated in the dropouts, then tighten it. The brake should not be able to contact the tire, only the rim.

Not sure from what is here what kind of bike and brand of brakes or derailleurs you have.

You could always Google it. There are lots of how-to's with illustrations out there. For example, "shimano rear brake adjustment" finds a whole bunch of advise.

Front guard???

Posted on Feb 20, 2010

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Why do i have a slight rubbing/ticking noise from very low speed coasting on my bike?


lots of reasons .......could be chain rubbing on chain guide if it has a chain,or may be worn out chain,.........could be tire rubbing ....check and make sure both tires are evenly spaced between forks and swing arm.....if it has a chain guard make sure chain is not rubbing on guard....Best way to check is to put it on it's double kick stand and start the bike put it in gear and let the tire spin at idle and listen and look for the problem.

Jul 16, 2014 | 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250

1 Answer

Weird squeky whine from bike during acceleration, just had new tire put on rear


Hi put your bike on the side stand get some blocks or something to put under the frame as far back under the frame tp lift the rear wheel off the ground spin your tire maybe the mechanic adjusted the rear wheel off center and its rubbing the fender, swing arm. or belt guard.

Oct 29, 2012 | 2002 Suzuki LS 650 Savage

2 Answers

I let a friend borrow my bike and he had a new tire put on back it is a 170/80-15 and now the tire rubs the stabilizer bar and if you adjust it off the bar then it rubs the chain is this tire bigger than...


Hi,
It is clear that your new tire is bigger than previous one. You have now 17 cm wide tire but previously 15 cm wide. This is why the new tire rub your stabilizer bars. You can use additional spacer on bearing shaft actually, but this is not a good idea as it will give impact on bike instability. I suggest to replace the tire with previous one. This is the best for your bike.
Remember that tire with data 170 / 80 - 15 mean: - 170mm ( 17 cm ) tire width - 80 ( %) width to height comparison - 15 ( inch) wheel diameter

Warm regards, please vote if helpful, Jay

Mar 11, 2011 | 2001 Suzuki VZ 800 Marauder

1 Answer

The frame is rubbing on the driver's side front tire how much does it normally cost to repair it?


unless the vehicle has been in an accident it in not the frame, sounds to me like your wheel well liner is hanging down and rubbing on your tire if this is the case then it will only be a few dollars for some hardware to reattach it you should find what you need in the help section at your local auto parts store

Jun 29, 2010 | 1999 Pontiac Grand Am GT

1 Answer

1983 Yamaha XJ Maxim 750. Rear tire rubbing on driveshaft


Hi, Blzofaz for this scenario you will need your service/owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Yamaha, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
rear tire rub normal
How to remove the rear wheel of your shaft driven motorcycle
Yamaha XJ750 Owner Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
http://mybikemanuals.com/yamaha/yamaha-xj-owners-manuals

May 25, 2010 | 1985 Yamaha XJ 700 S Maxim

1 Answer

The bike makes a loud, rubbing noise. Any ideas?


The most common problem that causes a loud rubbing sound is a tire, usually the back tire, rubbing on the frame, and you can usually see exactly where it is rubbing. Brakes can rub too, but they usually are not that loud, so let's assume it is the tire. This happens when the rear axle wasn't tight enough, and when you pedal hard or hit a pothole, it can make the axle pivot in the slots it fits in, and this lets the tire to rub on the frame, usually on the front part of the rear tire.
Solution: For this kind of work, I usually flip the bike upside down on an old piece of carpet, etc. so it is sitting on the seat and handlebars with the front wheel pointing straight ahead. There are two common methods to secure the axle:
1. Two pretty good sized nuts, one on each side. Find a wrench that fits just right. I prefer a socket, box end or open end wrench, one for each side. On metric nuts, it will often be 14mm or 15mm, sometimes bigger. American sizes are usually in the 9/16 - 5/8 - 11/16" range. I strongly discourage you from using any kind of pliers or even an adjustable (crescent) wrench. You have to tighten these babies pretty tight, and you can easily burr the corners off your nuts with adjustable tools, believe me I've done it. The tricky part is you have to do three things at once. First, you have to keep the front part of the tire evenly spaced between the two sides of the frame. Next, you have to slide both sides of the axle back in their slots until the chain has the proper tension. If you have a ten-speed style bike, the derailler mechanism will adjust the tension automatically for you, so slide the axle all the way back until the side with the gears is against the back of its slot, and let the other side move forward or back as needed for the tire to be centered between the frame. Finally, while you are keeping things lined up - a patient friend who is willing to help makes this much easier, just have them hold the tire so it is evenly spaced between the frame, and then you have to tighten the nuts. If you don't have a ten-speed style gear changer on the back tire, you have to take up most of the slack in the chain yourself and hold it tight until you get those nuts tight enough to keep the axle from slipping. Don't be surprised if you have to loosen up the nuts and do it again - on a single speed bike you should have about 1/4" to 1/2" of flex in the middle of the chain, halfway between the front and rear sprockets. Too tight, and it can wear out your bearings or chain well before their time. Too loose, and your chain will fall off at the worst possible moment, and you will have to do this process all over again, after you push your bike back home. Tighten a little on each side until things get snug, and if the tire is still centered between the frame, do both sides again, harder now (grunt a little this time, it helps) and you should be good to go. Remember, you are not trying to strip the axle threads, or break anything, but you do have to get it tight enough so it won't slip on you again.
2. Oh, yeah, there is another common method you find pretty often on ten-speed style bikes, the quick release.
91177b4.jpg This is an assembly that consists of a lever built onto the axle nut, and the lever is only on one side. You don't use a wrench on the quick release, but they are a little tricky until you understand how they work. As you pull the lever away from the frame, a cam inside loosens the axle, and as you push the lever toward the frame, it tightens. When the lever is in the loose position, you can also spin the nut on the axle tighter or looser (careful, it doesn't take much, and clockwise should be tighter on most bikes). Tightening or loosening the nut part does most of travel, and the lever does the last little bit. The lever is short, usually only 2-3 inches, so if you don't have to push pretty hard on the lever, the nut is probably too loose, and you need to loosen the lever and rotate the nut part clockwise a little bit, until it feels like the axle is getting really good and tight just about the time the lever gets close to the frame. This can also take 2-3 tries of loosening the lever, tightening or loosening the nut, and retightening the lever again, until it feels good and tight, and of course, you have to check your tire alignment one more time to make sure it is still nicely centered between the frame of the bike. Turn the wheel by hand a few turns to make sure it doesn't rub on the frame. If everything is tight, and your tire is still centered, you're ready for a test ride. Just up and down the driveway to start with, and make sure your brakes are okay. Then you can go a little farther, and pedal a little harder. Hopefully the axle will be nice and solid, and you can say, "Good Job! I fixed it myself, on Fixya!"

May 09, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

Rear wheel assembly for flstc 1994 rear wheel is not centring,too far over to the left, drive belt is rubbing on wheel


Unless someone has changed a spacer or something , the rear wheel should be centered with the frame, not necessarily the swingarm. The rear brake caliper bracket acts as the spacer on the right side and there is a spacer on the left side. This spacer on the left side should be just short enough to get into the swingarm without a lot of excess space once installed. You should not be squeezing your swingarm more than 0.125 inch or so.

Now, there are other things that will cause the tire to rub the final drive belt. Too wide tire will do this. The '94 models used the old style wide belts unlike the narrower belt used by the later models. If you install a like is on a later model, it's too wide and will probably rub. The next reason for tire belt interference is the rear tire not being adjusted correctly and it is not under the bike straight. Adjust the rear wheel by measuring the length of the adjuster bolt relative to the axle. These measurements should be the same on both sides of the swingarm. If you can't do that, find something about six feet long that you can use as a straight edge to check the alignment of the rear wheel to the front wheel. Keep in mind that there is an offset designed into the front wheel. Just make sure that the rear wheel is as straight relative to the frame as you can get it.

Even with all this stuff correctly set, the final drive belt will be close to the side of the tire but it should not rub.

Feb 28, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLSTC Heritage...

2 Answers

93 FXR Rear tire rubs belt guard w/axle centered.


Try just bending the belt guard or removing it and fileing some material off the guard so it does not rub. You may also be able to remedy this by adding washers to the belt guard attach points.

May 30, 2009 | 1993 Harley Davidson FXR Super Glide

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cycling Logo

Related Topics:

42 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Fuji Cycling Experts

sharky633
sharky633

Level 2 Expert

510 Answers

dante

Level 3 Expert

388 Answers

Donald Ayers-Marsh

Level 3 Expert

985 Answers

Are you a Fuji Cycling Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...