Question about Nikon Coolpix 4800 Digital Camera

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The camera is developing dark areas around the edge of the pictures on 2 different sides. you can see these dark spots on the viewfinder and on the pictures. what is causing this?

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I have had this identical camera for many years. Sometimes the lens cover doesn't open completely, and if I don't notice it, the photo will have dark edges. Could this be your problem?

Posted on Aug 18, 2009

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If your lens is clean.

The dark spots maybe your image pickup sensor going out. Try going into the menu to tools select pixel mapping see if that helps it will look at all your pixels and determine if they are bad & try to compensate.

Hope it helps. Good Luck! please let me Know if this works or if you need more help.

Posted on Mar 11, 2009

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