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Losing transmission speed

After i boot up my computer my transmision speed will go from 54 to 1 mbps after about two minutes

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Because speed is not constant

Posted on Mar 09, 2009

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1 Answer

NetGear wireless router WGR614 v6 runs with speed 1 0 mbps instead of 54 mbps


how far away are you from your wireless router when your getting 10 mbps?
Please note that wireless will not guarantee speeds of 54 mbps.
It will dramatically decrease the farther away you or how much interference there is between your laptop and router.
Also check if your wireless router is set to 802.11 G mode. if you have any devices that only support 802.11B you will only get speeds up to 11mbps compared to G at 54mbps

Mar 13, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

The wifi is going 54 mbps but should be 100 mbps all cords are plugged-in properly what do i do?


wireless speed depends upon the wireless card that is installed on your computer...

if your computer have a

802.11 b/g card, it will connect at 54 mbps speed (That is the maximum speed at which the wireless can connect to the router)...


802.11 n card, it will connect at 150+ mbps speed...

Feb 06, 2011 | D-Link RangeBooster G WBR-2310 Wireless...

1 Answer

Hi, Although I have N series ADSL2+ Router and a N


N series routers can communicate at a speed of 150 Mbps, only if the wireless adapter that is built-in into the computer comes under N standard...
Most of the wireless adapters comes under G standard, which can communicate only at a speed of 54 Mbps...
The N standard routers are backward compatible, which can communicate with N standard adapters at 150 Mbps, and with G standard adapters at 54 Mbps and with B standard at 11 Mbps...


The speed in which the adapters can communicate are listed below...
B - 11 Mbps
G - 54 mbps
N - 150 Mbps

Dec 23, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I am only getting 34-54 Mbps with my Linksys. I have a wireless adapter in my computer. It will go lower, but never than higher than 54 Mbps? I know i can get 100mbps because my Xbox does. Help me out!


Wireless Ethernet (802.11a or b or g) does not get the bandwidth you would get through a cabled connection. My guess is that you have an 802.11g network card in your computer and 54 Mbps is the top theoretical speed for that type of Wireless adapter. Cabled connections will give you the theoretical throughput of 100 Mbps. Also, since this Linksys device is not a Wireless access point but simply a switch, your computer doesn't actually connect to it. Most likely you are connecting to your cable or DSL modem. Most of these have a wireless radio built in.

Oct 15, 2010 | Linksys EtherFast EZXS55W 5x10/100 Mbps...

2 Answers

100mbps on my house computer but only 54 on my laptop


100mbps is just the maximum speed capacity that can be used and depends on the speed that you subscribed so it doesn't mean you'll get a sharp 100 mbps on that.

Mar 31, 2010 | Toshiba Satellite M55-S331 Notebook

1 Answer

Slow internet at 120 Kbps but fast connection at 54 Mbps Why


54 Mbps is the speed between your computer and your wireless router. The .8 Mbps is the speed of your connection between the router and the internet. You should call your ISP and ask what your speeds should be; there could be something wrong on their end or your modem might be malfunctioning. It's also possible that your WiFi connection itself has a weak signal. That can be corrected by moving the router and the computer closer together, or getting a signal relay and putting it between them.

Jan 22, 2010 | IBM Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Router down when copy files


Check in your routers settings via your browser that the file transfer speed is no higher than 54 mbps, as it may be set at 108 mbps or 125 mbps as a 'g' type router should be, but your wireless network adapters can only work at 54 mbps and are crashing the transfers.

Feb 28, 2007 | Belkin (F5D5231-4) Router

1 Answer

NetGear Super G 108Mbps Wireless Firewall


If you are connecting wirelessly, then it's more than likely that your wireless card or usb dongle cannot connect as you router is probably set at 108 mbps. Your receivers are more than likely only capable of connecting at 54 mbps so change the streaming rate on your router to 54 mbps. This will not alter your internet connection speed as the 108 mbps only refers to the rate of streaming speed on your local area connection (from one pc to another)

Dec 30, 2006 | NetGear Super G 108Mbps Wireless Firewall...

1 Answer

In my new router getting less speed in wireless connection than when connected with a cable.


The 54 mbps refers to the stream rate from the router to the wireless reciever, the 100-110 kbps you refer to is the connection speed to the internet. These are two different things, if you were transfering files from one pc to another it would transfer at a max speed of 54 mbps. If you connect via a cable it would be 100 mbps. Your internet speed depends on your isp server your downloads will be less than 256kbps, with even less upload speed.

Dec 19, 2006 | D-Link AirPlus DI-524 Wireless Router

1 Answer

Really see 54 Mbps with 54g?


As with any wireless protocol, 54g has overhead associated with it that limits performance. While signaling data rates of up to 54 Mbps may be achieved, like most shared media (e.g. Ethernet) throughput will be significantly less. There are two scenarios for 54g performance. In an environment with only 54g clients, throughput can exceed 24 Mbps. This performance is equivalent to that of 802.11a, although 54g is usually available over a greater range. The second scenario is where 802.11b clients are present. RTS/CTS flow control must be used to allow 802.11b clients to recognize and establish communications with 802.11g access points. This leads to delays in transmission and drops peak throughput to about 10 Mbps. 54g performance is still well in excess of the maximum measured speeds of 4-5 Mbps for 802.11b. The use of RTS/CTS is important because it provides determinism to the wireless network, ensuring a minimum bandwidth for each user. Like Ethernet, 802.11 LANs normally use a ג?œcarrier sense media accessג? mechanism to signal transmission without asking for permission from the network. As the network becomes highly loaded, collisions occur more frequently and the network can become saturated with packet retransmission attempts that eventually make it impossible for any data to get through. RTS/CTS provides a more formalized flow-control mechanism that avoids this problem.

Feb 16, 2006 | Belkin (F5D72304F5D7000) Router

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