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No spark at plugs. Test light will light at the wire going into the dist. Also will light at small piece of points. Sometimes I get spark at wire coming out of magnito. Not sure if it was a good ground when I tried it.

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Look for a light color coating on the parts if there is clean it off with sand papper check under the cap to

Posted on Nov 03, 2009

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Were does the wire for the points on a bolens 1058 cone from


The ignition coil will have two small nuts , one on each side of the spark plug wire. It can be labeled many ways, + - , pos neg , Bat Dist , point will hook to the - ,NEG , Dist . The only time this will be the other way is when you system is a Positive ground, that is the + , positive of the battery hooked to the frame instead of the - Neg.

Mar 13, 2016 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

2 Answers

Will crank but fowls the plugs out without choking and will not fire


check for flooding in the carby-- faulty needle and seat and float

Apr 07, 2015 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

1 Answer

Backfires after running and stops, must shut off to stop the backfireing. I have replaced the fuel filter, and checked the gas cap vent,what else could cause the backfire?


For a more specific answer, you should post the applicable elements of Make/Model/Year/Engine Model/Transmission Model/Deck Size, and hours on meter if you have one. A short description of the events preceding the beginning of the problem is also helpful.

Several possibilities for small engine backfire:
  1. Needs new plugs. Start with new plugs.
  2. Shear pin under flywheel is slightly damaged throwing off the timing. Remove flywheel examine shear pin for any damage. Just go ahead and replace it; if it even looks nicked or sliced.
  3. Coil, or spark plug wire, is going bad. Inside the Coil are two windings of wire and no moving parts. With shorted (melted together inside) windings you can still get a spark, but it will be weak. With open (burnt/broken) windings, you get no spark at all. There are also electronic components like diodes which may be failing. Coils are subjected to heat and vibration and do fail on occasion. Another coil consideration is the spark plug wire. Back in the day, we would replace all our spark plug wires when we gave our car a tune up; because spark plug wires do fail. The only way to replace the spark plug wire on a mower is to replace the Ignition Coil.

    Note: Coils may not fail completely at first. They can be complicit in the situation where a mower starts and runs for a while.They may cause backfire. As it heats up the coil parts expand and cause the engine to shut down. It does not re-start until the machine has cooled enough to allow the coil to cool. This can be 30 minute to several hours; perhaps it starts again the next day only to repeat the failure.

    Short of a well running engine, with no special equipment, the only field-test for a coil and the spark plug wire output is to visually assess the color of the spark at the end of the spark plug. Alternatively, you may use a spark tester. A spark tester gauges the strength of spark by making it jump a bigger gap. This test calls for a gap in the range of 4.2 mm (0.166 in). It's important to note that setting a test gap beyond 5.0 mm (0.200) could damage the ignition components. Briggs and Stratton manuals, for the newer engines, specifically state that you should not test for spark with the spark plug out. I do not know why this is. They specify you should use a spark tester.

    B&S notwithstanding (at your own risk), with a new plug attached to the plug wire hold the threaded part against a ground point or wrap some bare copper wire around the threads and fasten the wire to the engine frame or other good ground. Make your shop or garage dark so you can see the spark easily, then crank the engine. The flywheel must spin rapidly (at least 350 RPM). The strength of the spark is revealed in the color. A red or yellow spark is weak and probably will not spark in the cylinder. A blue or white spark is strong and has enough voltage to fight across the spark plug gap even under pressure within the cylinder.
    Note: a good strong spark also makes a strong snapping noise as it fires.
  4. Needs a valve adjustment or a valve job. This is high on the list of the most common reasons for backfire. Start with adjustment.
  5. The other thing that causes backfire is fuel mixture too lean. On a small engine this is not usually an adjustment problem. It may be the fuel system/carburetor is dirty or partially clogged. It may also be an air leak in the gaskets of the intake manifold. It might be low fuel pressure from a bad pump or clogged fuel lines.The electronic fuel shut off valve may be malfunctioning. If nothing else solves the backfire, check fuel flow through the pump and lines, remove the carburetor and clean or rebuild it. This is the least likely of the options so save it for last.
Here is a link to a great essay on magnetos and spark plugs.
Village Science Magneto Spark Plugs

For Twin Cylinder Engines
A power balance, or cylinder balance, test should be run on a twin cylinder engine. If compression is good and cylinder leakage is minimal (in other words if the engine is not worn out, doesn't have too many hours), but a cylinder is misfiring or shows up weak in a power balance test, it indicates a fuel delivery or ignition problem (fouled spark plug or bad plug wire).

If an engine is hard starting, runs rough, misses or lacks power, a cylinder balance test will determine if both cylinders are operating to their full potential. You will need an engine tachometer, a spark tester, and an insulated screwdriver.
  1. Using the spark tester, with the plugs in, start engine and verify spark is equally good on both cylinders.
  2. Remove spark tester.
  3. Connect engine tachometer
  4. Run engine at top no load speed. Note rpm.
  5. Ground one cylinder spark plug with screwdriver. Note rpm.
  6. Ground other cylinder with screwdriver. Note rpm.
The difference in RPM between the cylinders should be less than 75 rpm. If the difference between the two cylinders is greater than 75 rpm, the cylinder with the least rpm loss is the weakest and is a potential problem.

Mar 26, 2015 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

1 Answer

Will not start, no fire


When a person says "I am not getting any spark", we have to assume this means the engine cranks whenever you turn the key. Or, it spins whenever you pull the rope.

A mechanically functional (meaning all the internal parts are working, i.e. pistons, valves, etc) engine requires a steady flow of three things, air, fuel, and spark in order for the engine to start and run. These are the trinity, or triad of a happy engine.

If you are in fact not getting spark, after you crank the engine, or pull the rope for a while, you should begin to smell the un-burnt gas passing through the engine. This is a good indication that you have gas flow and air is making it through the carburetor. That is a good thing. It is verification that you have air and fuel, but no spark. If you do not smell this fuel after a bit of cranking you may have fuel problems. Keep in mind that if you smell this fuel it means the cylinder(s) are now flooded and it's time to back off the choke and crank it in the run position.

BEFORE you begin your tests, consider the engines kill system. Modern day safety systems include a kill wire. This will be a single wire going to a connecting terminal on the coil. The wire is small and can be disconnected. Disconnecting this wire isolates the engine from all the possible bad switches, relays, diodes, and wiring setup designed to kill the engine if safety procedures are not followed. SOOO, you may want to run your spark plug test without taking off the engine shroud and disconnecting the kill wire. If you get a quick fix, great! If not you will need to remove the shroud before going through the rest of the tests. You must find and disconnect the kill wire, then begin your coil and spark plug tests again. If the engine starts and runs, then you have a chore in store. You will have to track down the faulty part in your safety system.

Note: it is likely, with a disconnected kill wire the engine may start, but when you turn the key off, or otherwise try to shut the machine off, the engine will keep on running. Just slip the kill wire terminal back on and the engine will die, or wait till it runs out of fuel.

Providing spark to the engine is one of the simple systems and relatively easy to diagnose. Start with the spark plug. You CANNOT test a spark plug (without expensive equipment in your lab). For instance, did you know that it takes more juice to create a spark under compression than it does at normal atmospheric pressure? So just because you have a visible spark from the plug outside the cylinder does not mean you have a usable spark under compression.

The ONLY answer to this end of the problem is to get a new one; even if the current one is not very old. Briggs & Stratton recommend changing the spark plug annually. The spark plug sits in the cylinder and is subjected to compression, high heat, explosive forces, constant vibration, and of course electric shock in the 15,000 volt range. Make sure the gap is set correctly on the new one, typically 0.76 mm (0.030 in).

If you want to know why you should just throw in the towel and start with a fresh spark plug, go here and read this wonderful essay on spark and spark plugs. Village Science Magneto Spark Plugs

So now you have your new plug, properly gapped and it still won't start. Next up is the Magneto or Coil. If you have not already done so, pull the shroud, or fan cover, from the top of your engine and you will see a heavy metal wheel with fan blades. This is the Flywheel/Magneto. It has permanent magnets embedded in the side. As the magnets fly passed the coil, current is generated. Seldom do the magnets go bad, but you should feel a strong attractive force of the magnets when you hold a screwdriver about an inch from the magnets. If they do not seem to be very strong you might have to replace the flywheel. This is a very rare happenstance.

Follow your spark plug wire back to the small metal thingy, mounted next to the flywheel, now you are at the Ignition Coil; or just Coil for short. TWIN cylinder engines have two Coils; one for each plug. A coil generates the 15,000 volts required by the spark plug. The Coil must be a precise distance from the flywheel. This is the Ignition Coil Gap. This gap usually .20 mm to .30 mm (.008-.012 in) from the flywheel. To set this gap properly, the magnets on the flywheel must be right in front of the coil when you set the gap. Check your specs. If the gap ain't right the spark ain't bright.

With the exception of the kill wire designed to stop the Coil from working, the Coil functions entirely independent of the rest of the wiring systems on the machine. If you disconnect the kill wire and the coil is good you will get spark to your engine regardless of the condition of the rest of the entire wiring system. The Coil works all by itself. It does not need the battery or the key switched on.

Inside the Coil are two windings of wire and no moving parts. With shorted (melted together inside) windings you can still get a spark, but it will be weak. With open (burnt/broken) windings, you get no spark at all. There are also electronic components like diodes which may be failing. Coils are subjected to heat and vibration and do fail on occasion. Another coil consideration is the spark plug wire. Back in the day, we would replace all our spark plug wires when we gave our car a tune up; because spark plug wires do fail. The only way to replace the spark plug wire on a mower is to replace the Ignition Coil.

Note: Coils may not fail completely at first.They can be complicit in the situation where a mower starts and runs for a while. As it heats up the coil parts expand and cause the engine to shut down. It does not re-start until the machine has cooled enough to allow the coil to cool. This can be 30 minute to several hours; perhaps it starts again the next day only to repeat the failure.

Short of a well running engine, with no special equipment, the only field-test for a coil and the spark plug wire output is to visually assess the color of the spark. Alternatively, you may use a spark tester. A spark tester gauges the strength of spark by making it jump a bigger gap. This test calls for a gap in the range of 4.2 mm (0.166 in). It's important to note that setting a test gap beyond 5.0 mm (0.200) could damage the ignition components. Briggs and Stratton manuals, for the newer engines, specifically state that you should not test for spark with the spark plug out. I do not know why this is. They specify you should use a spark tester.

B&S notwithstanding (at your own risk), with a new plug attached to the plug wire hold the threaded part against a ground point or wrap some bare copper wire around the threads and fasten the wire to the engine frame or other good ground.Make your shop or garage dark so you can see the spark easily, then crank the engine. The flywheel must spin rapidly (at least 350 RPM). The strength of the spark is revealed in the color. A red or yellow spark is weak and probably will not spark in the cylinder. A blue or white spark is strong and has enough voltage to fight across the spark plug gap even under pressure within the cylinder.

Note: a good strong spark also makes a strong snapping noise as it fires. With the kill wire removed and the Coil gapped correctly, if there is no spark at all with your new plug (try two new plugs in case one is faulty) it may be time to replace the coil.

One final note: On a twin cylinder engine you may have one side firing and not the other; quite common actually. You have the option of switching parts from one side to the other to help diagnose which part is bad. The spark will follow the good part; lack of spark will go with the bad part. It's important to note at this point, IF the safety system is at fault, neither side will spark. That's a clue.

That about covers it for diagnosing and curing a weak spark or no spark problem.

Mar 20, 2015 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

1 Answer

No fire to engine


When a person says "I am not getting any spark", we have to assume this means the engine cranks whenever you turn the key. Or, it spins whenever you pull the rope.

A mechanically functional (meaning all the internal parts are working, i.e. pistons, valves, etc) engine requires a steady flow of three things, air, fuel, and spark in order for the engine to start and run. These are the trinity, or triad of a happy engine.

If you are in fact not getting spark, after you crank the engine, or pull the rope for a while, you should begin to smell the un-burnt gas passing through the engine. This is a good indication that you have gas flow and air is making it through the carburetor. That is a good thing. It is verification that you have air and fuel, but no spark. If you do not smell this fuel after a bit of cranking you may have fuel problems. Keep in mind that if you smell this fuel it means the cylinder(s) are now flooded and it's time to back off the choke and crank it in the run position.

BEFORE you begin your tests, consider the engine kill system. Modern day safety systems include a kill wire. This will be a single wire going to a connecting terminal on the coil. The wire is small and can be disconnected. Disconnecting this wire isolates the engine from all the possible bad switches, relays, diodes, and wiring setups designed to kill the engine if safety procedures are not followed. SOOO, you may want to run your spark plug test without taking off the engine shroud and disconnecting the kill wire. If you get a quick fix, great! If not you will need to remove the shroud before going through the rest of the tests. You must find and disconnect the kill wire, then begin your coil and spark plug tests again. If the engine starts and runs, then you have a chore in store. You will have to track down the faulty part in your safety system.

Note: it is likely, with a disconnected kill wire the engine may start, but when you turn the key off, or otherwise try to shut the machine off, the engine will keep on running. Just slip the kill wire terminal back on and the engine will die, or wait till it runs out of fuel.

Providing spark to the engine is one of the simple systems and relatively easy to diagnose. Start with the spark plug. You CANNOT test a spark plug (without expensive equipment in your lab). For instance, did you know that it takes more juice to create a spark under compression than it does at normal atmospheric pressure? So just because you have a visible spark from the plug outside the cylinder does not mean you have a usable spark under compression.

The ONLY answer to this end of the problem is to get a new one; even if the current one is not very old. Briggs & Stratton recommend changing the spark plug annually. The spark plug sits in the cylinder and is subjected to compression, high heat, explosive forces, constant vibration, and of course electric shock in the 15,000 volt range. Make sure the gap is set correctly on the new one, typically 0.76 mm (0.030 in).

If you want to know why you should just throw in the towel and start with a fresh spark plug, go here and read this wonderful essay on spark and spark plugs.
http://www.ankn.uaf.edu/publications/VS/magneto.html

So now you have your new plug, properly gapped and it still won't start. Next up is the Magneto or Coil. If you have not already done so, pull the shroud, or fan cover, from the top of your engine and you will see a heavy metal wheel with fan blades. This is the Flywheel/Magneto. It has permanent magnets embedded in the side. As the magnets fly passed the coil, current is generated. Seldom do the magnets go bad, but you should feel a strong attractive force of the magnets when you hold a screwdriver about an inch from the magnets. If they do not seem to be very strong you might have to replace the flywheel. This is a very rare happenstance.

Follow your spark plug wire back to the small metal thingy, mounted next to the flywheel, now you are at the Ignition Coil; or just Coil for short. TWIN cylinder engines have two Coils; one for each plug. A coil generates the 15,000 volts required by the spark plug. The Coil must be a precise distance from the flywheel. This is the Ignition Coil Gap. This gap usually .20 mm to .30 mm (.008-.012 in) from the flywheel. To set this gap properly, the magnets on the flywheel must be right in front of the coil when you set the gap. Check your specs. If the gap ain't right the spark ain't bright.

With the exception of the kill wire designed to stop the Coil from working, the Coil functions entirely independent of the rest of the wiring systems on the machine. If you disconnect the kill wire and the coil is good you will get spark to your engine regardless of the condition of the rest of the entire wiring system. The Coil works all by itself. It does not need the battery or the key switched on.

Inside the Coil are two windings of wire and no moving parts. With shorted (melted together inside) windings you can still get a spark, but it will be weak. With open (burnt/broken) windings, you get no spark at all. There are also electronic components like diodes which may be failing. Coils are subjected to heat and vibration and do fail on occasion. Another coil consideration is the spark plug wire. Back in the day, we would replace all our spark plug wires when we gave our car a tune up; because spark plug wires do fail. The only way to replace the spark plug wire on a mower is to replace the Ignition Coil.

Note: Coils may not fail completely at first. They can be complicit in the situation where a mower starts and runs for a while. As it heats up the coil parts expand and cause the engine to shut down. It does not re-start until the machine has cooled enough to allow the coil to cool. This can be 30 minute to several hours; perhaps it starts again the next day only to repeat the failure.

Short of a well running engine, with no special equipment, the only field-test for a coil and the spark plug wire output is to visually assess the color of the spark. Alternatively, you may use a spark tester. A spark tester gauges the strength of spark by making it jump a bigger gap. This test calls for a gap in the range of 4.2 mm (0.166 in). It's important to note that setting a test gap beyond 5.0 mm (0.200) could damage the ignition components. Briggs and Stratton manuals, for the newer engines, specifically state that you should not test for spark with the spark plug out. I do not know why this is. They specify you should use a spark tester.

B&S notwithstanding (at your own risk), with a new plug attached to the plug wire hold the threaded part against a ground point or wrap some bare copper wire around the threads and fasten the wire to the engine frame or other good ground. Make your shop or garage dark so you can see the spark easily, then crank the engine. The flywheel must spin rapidly (at least 350 RPM). The strength of the spark is revealed in the color. A red or yellow spark is weak and probably will not spark in the cylinder. A blue or white spark is strong and has enough voltage to fight across the spark plug gap even under pressure within the cylinder.

Note: a good strong spark also makes a strong snapping noise as it fires. With the kill wire removed and the Coil gapped correctly, if there is no spark at all with your new plug (try two new plugs in case one is faulty) it may be time to replace the coil.

One final note: On a twin cylinder engine you may have one side firing and not the other; quite common actually. You have the option of switching parts from one side to the other to help diagnose which part is bad. The spark will follow the good part; lack of spark will go with the bad part. It's important to note at this point, IF the safety system is at fault, neither side will spark. That's a clue.

That about covers it for diagnosing and curing a weak spark or no spark problem.

Mar 20, 2015 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

2 Answers

I AM NOT GETTING FIRE TO THE #8 AND #5 PLUG WIRE ON A 1964 283 SMALL BLOCK THAT HAS BEEN CONVERTED TO ELECTRONIC IGNITION


Are you checking at the Dist Cap or spark plug end of plug wire ?
If you are checking at the plug end of wire try exchanging that wire with a working wire. If the problem is not there with other good wire the wire must be bad. If it is not the plug wires to #8 & #5 replace DIST CAP. The Cap must be cracked or arcing internally.

Oct 16, 2013 | Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

1 Answer

No spark to spark plugs on john deere 2510


do you have a bad wire or a bad wire going from the points to the coil

Jul 28, 2012 | John Deere Step 2510 2520 3010 3020 4000...

3 Answers

Turns over not starting changed points


Verify the point gap is set right and that you are getting a good spark. Check to see if you are getting fuel to the carb.

John

Oct 03, 2009 | Ford 8n,9n,2n, Tractor Starter With Drive

2 Answers

My lawn tractor won't start no spark an I have aready replaced the electrical control circuit board. It is a LX277 lawn tractor year 2000 I think. After I replaced the circuit board It still did't start I...


Hi,

There are 4 reasons for a John Deere Tractor not to start. Those are :-

1. Battery
2. Fuel
3. Spark
4. Compression

The first thing that you need to do in case of no spark, pull out the black wire coming out of to engine by the starter unplug and test for spark.

The next step would be Points and coils. What did you gap the point at? It should be about .016 Check with your ignition key on, your test light should light up when touching the small post on the plus side of the ignition coil.

Let me know once done.

Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

Sep 10, 2009 | John Deere Riding Mowers & Garden Tractors

2 Answers

Mower runs for about 20 minutes cuts off. Acks


Make sure that the gas cap is allowing air to enter through the small hole. If not, a vacuum will build up and the engine can't get gas. You could try running it with the gas cap on loosely. If that doesn't fix it, the next time it stalls quickly remove the spark plug and see if it is wet. If it is, you will know it's an electrical problem.

Aug 29, 2009 | Craftsman 17.5 hp 42 in. Deck Lawn Tractor...

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