Question about E-Machines T2200 PC Desktop

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PC crashes repeatedly, sometimes comes back on, screen says this!

Problem caused by computer hardware
You received this message because hardware or software in your computer caused Windows to shut down unexpectedly and restart. This is a serious problem, commonly referred to as a stop error or blue screen.

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  • rogersannett Mar 10, 2009

    I haven't added any hardware, I made sure there was nothing blocking fans, It just keeps turning itself off then on, and sometimes it just goes off!

  • rogersannett Aug 26, 2009

    Thanks so much for your help, but I ended up taking it to a shop and the guy there was really helpful and I found out that all was wrong was that it had accumulated dust inside, and after he cleaned it, it worked perfectly and like brand new!!
    Thanks again,
    Ann

  • Ben Wabnick
    Ben Wabnick May 11, 2010

    Are you able to get into safe mode?




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  • 72 Answers

This problem is cause by some hardware components. just make sure all of your hardware components are fixed correctly with mainboard. or else, if you installed any new hardware options to your computer, just remove that & try to start the computer.
if you still have that problem, just let me know!! 

Posted on Mar 09, 2009

Testimonial: "Thanks so much, but I ended up having it worked on to clean out the dust and its working great!! Thanks!!"

  • Kajatheepan Manoharan
    Kajatheepan Manoharan Mar 10, 2009

    did u connect the power & restart wires with correct ****. if not, just make sure that. 

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3 Answers

Acer computer keeps crashing


Best thing to try before anything is to run your computer in safe mode.
Make sure the computer is off and not in sleep or in hibernate.
Power the computer on and click the F8 key till you see below image.
Image is from a Windows 7 - Most versions of windows will be the same Or similar. Screen defaults to 640 X 480 in safe-mode!
13783a43-9db3-45db-a22d-3145e53611c2.png
Choose safe mode with networking. If while running your computer in safe mode and it never blue screens - Then chances are, you have a software, driver or virus issue - Most cases. If your computer continues to crash in safe mode. Your system most likely has a hardware issue. Common: Computer Memory and/or hard drive.

Jun 14, 2013 | Computers & Internet

Tip

10 Reasons Why Personal Computers That You Must Know


10 REASONS WHY PC's CRASH


1. VIRUSES

The first sign of virus infection is instability. Some viruses erase the boot sector of a hard drive making it impossible to start. This why it is a good idea to create Windows start-up disk.

Go to Start Menu-Control Panel-Add/Remove Programs and look for the start up disk tab.

Virus protection requires constant vigilance. A virus scanner requires a list of viurs signatures in order to be able to identify viruses. The signatures are stored in a DAT file. DAT files should be updated weekly or monthly from website of your antivirus software.

2. SOFTWARE

A common cause of computer crash is faulty or badly installed software . Often the problem can be cure uninstalling the software and then reinstalling it.

Another is uninstall some programs that have file sharing components to other programs like operating system that will make your computer unbootable.

If your Windows problem crash, try entering to Safe mode. This can be done during start up and when you see the message "starting windows" press F4 and it will take you to safe mode.

Safe Mode loads a minimum of drivers. It allows you to find and fix problems that prevent Windows from loading properly.

3. PRINTERS

The action of sending a document to print creates a bigger file often called a postcript file.

Printers have only small amount of memory called a buffer. This can be easily overloaded. Printing a document also uses a considerable amount of CPU power that will slow down your computer's performance.

If printer is trying to print unusual characters, these might not be recognised and can crash the computer. Sometimes printers will not recover from a crash due to confusion in the buffer.

A good way to clear the buffer is to unplug the printer for 10 seconds. Booting up from a powerless state called a cold boot and it will restore your printer's default setting.

4. HARD DISK DRIVES

The information on a hard starts to become piecemeal or fragmented. It is good to defragment the hard disk every week or month to prevent a screen freeze.

Go to Start Menu-Accessories-System tools-Disk Fragmenter

Hard disk will slow down and crash if they are too full. Do some housekeeping on your hard drive every few months and free some space on it. Open the Windows folder on C drive and find the temporary internet file folder. Delete the contents that can free a lot of space.

Empty the recycle bin every week to free some space. Hard disk drives should be scanned every week for errors or bad sectors.

Go to Start menu-Programs-Accessories-System Tools-Scan Disk

5. HARDWARE CONFLICT

The number on reason why Windows crashes is hardware conflict. Each hardware device communicates to other devices through an interrupt request channel (IRQ). These are supported to be unique for each device.

For example, a printer usually connects internally on IRQ7 and keyboard usually uses IRQ1. Each device will try to hog a single IRQ for itself.

If there are lots of devices, or if they are not installed properly, two of them may end up sharing the same IRQ number. When the user tries to use both devices at the same time, a crash can happen. The way to check if your computer has a hardware conflict is checking to the Device Manager.

Go to Start menu-Control Panel-System-Hardware-Device Manager

Often if a device has a problem yellow ' ! ' apears next to its description in the device manager.

The best way to fix this problem is to remove the problem device and reinstall it again. Sometimes you may have to find more recent drivers on the internet to make the device function properly. A good source is www. driverguide.com.

6. BAD RAM

RAM (random access memory) problems might bring on the screen of death with a message saying Fatal Exception Error. A fatal error indicates a serious hardware problem. Sometimes it may mean a part is damaged and need replacement.

But fatal error cause by RAM might cause by mismatch of chips. For example, mixing 70ns (nanosecond) RAM with 60ns will usually force the computer to run all the RAM at sloer speed. This will often crash the machine if the RAM is overworked.

One way to solve this problem is to enter to BIOS setting and increase the wait state of the RAM. This can make it more stable. Another way to troubleshoot is is to rearrange the RAM Chips on motherboard, or take some of them out. Then try to repeat the circumstances that caused the crash. When handling RAM try not to touch the gold connections as they can easily damage.

Parity error messages also refer to RAM. Modern chips are either parity (ECC) or non parity (Non-ECC). It is best not to mix the two types as this can cause trouble.

EMM386 error messages refer to memory problems but not connected to bad ram. This may be due to free memory often linked to old DOS based programs.

7. BIOS settings

Every motherboard is supplied with range of chipset settings that are decided in the factory. A common way to access these settings is to press F2 or delete button during the first few seconds on a boot up.

Once inside the BIOS, great care should be taken. It is a good idea to write down on a piece of paper all the settings that appear on the screen so that you can revert the setting if you change it and computer becomes more unstable.

A common BIOS error concerns the CAS latency. This refers to the RAM. Older EDO (extended data out) RAM has a CAS latency of 3. Newer SDRAM has a CAS latency of 2. Setting the wrong figure can cause the RAM to lock up and freeze the computer's display.

Microsoft Windows is better at allocating IRQ numbers than any BIOS. If possible set the IRQ numbers to Auto in the BIOS. This will allow the windows to allocate the IRQ numbers ( make sure the BIOS setting for the Plug and Play OS is switched to 'yes" to allow Windows to do this).

8. FATAL OE EXCEPTIONS and VXD ERRORS

Fatal OE exceptions errors and VXD errors are often caused by video card problems. These can be resolved easily by reducing the resolution of the video display.

Go to Start menu-Setting-Control Panel-Display-Settings

Here you should slide the screen area bar to the left. Take a look at the colour setting on the left of that Window. For most desktops, high colour 16-bit depth is adequate.

If the screen freezes or you experience system lockups, it might due to video card. Make sure it does not have a hardware conflict.

Go to Start Menu- Setting-Control Panel-System-Device Manager

Here select the + beside Display adapter. A line of text describing your video card should appear.

Select by making it blue and press the properties-Resouces and select each line in the Windoe. Look for a message that says No Conflicts.

If you have video card hardware conflict, you will see it here. Be careful at this point and make note of everything you do in case you make things worse.

The best way to resolve hardware conflicts is to uncheck the Use Automatic Setting box and hit the change setting button. You are searching for a setting that will display no conflicts message.

Another useful way to resolve video problems is to

Go to Start Menu-Setting-Control Panel-System-Performance-Graphics

Here you should move the hardware acceleration slider to the left. As ever, the most common cause of the problems relating to graphics cards is old or faulty drivers ( a driver is a small piece of software used by computer to communicate with a device)

Look up your video card's manufacturer on the internet and seach for the most recent drivers for it.

9. OVERHEATING

CPU (central processing units) are usually equipped with fans to keep them cool. If the fan fails or if the CPU gets old it may start to overheat and generate a particular kind of error called kernel error. This common problem in chips that have been overclocked to operate highspeeds that they are supposed to.

One remedy is to get bigger fan and install it on the top of the cpu. Some special cooling fans / heat sinks are available also.

10. POWER SUPPLY PROBLEMS

With all the new construction goind on around the world, the steady supply of electricity has become disrupted. A power surge or spike can crash a computer as easily as a power cut.

The solution is to use UPS (uninterrupted power supply) to give you clean power when there is electricity and will give you a few minutes to perform a controlled shutdown in case of a power cut.

on Dec 18, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

10 reasons why PCs crash-You must know tip 2


2 Bad Ram

Ram (random-access memory) problems might bring on the blue screen of death with a message saying Fatal Exception Error. A fatal error indicates a serious hardware problem. Sometimes it may mean a part is damaged and will need replacing.

But a fatal error caused by Ram might be caused by a mismatch of chips. For example, mixing 70-nanosecond (70ns) Ram with 60ns Ram will usually force the computer to run all the Ram at the slower speed. This will often crash the machine if the Ram is overworked.

One way around this problem is to enter the BIOS settings and increase the wait state of the Ram. This can make it more stable. Another way to troubleshoot a suspected Ram problem is to rearrange the Ram chips on the motherboard, or take some of them out. Then try to repeat the circumstances that caused the crash. When handling Ram try not to touch the gold connections, as they can be easily damaged.

Parity error messages also refer to Ram. Modern Ram chips are either parity (ECC) or non parity (non-ECC). It is best not to mix the two types, as this can be a cause of trouble.

EMM386 error messages refer to memory problems but may not be connected to bad Ram. This may be due to free memory problems often linked to old Dos-based programmes.

on Mar 04, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Blue screen of death. unable to download drivers. can not get to safe mode. cannot reload orperating system disks.


First off, note down all relevant information when you see a BSOD flash across the screen. This includes the error number and friendly name from the 'bugcheck' section of the stop error (see above), and any file names specified in the 'driver information' section.
If the BSOD comes up on the screen for a split-second before the PC restarts and wipes all the useful information away, we need to change some settings within WinXP. In most cases, it should be possible to stop your PC from automatically restarting when it develops a major error, allowing you enough time to jot down the BSOD error message. If you are using WindowsXP, right click on my computer > Properties > Select the 'Advanced' tab > and under 'startup and recovery' click the 'settings' button. This will open a new window, and under the 'System Failure' heading, uncheck 'Automatically restart.' Continuing on, attempt to restart the computer normally into Windows. If the BSOD occurred while booting Windows, you may be taken to a troubleshooting menu and will have to select 'attempt to start Windows normally.' If your computer starts correctly, continue using it and store the error information for later reference. If the BSOD reoccurs at random or irregular periods, see Section D below on troubleshooting intermittent stop errors.
If your system does not start correctly or the stop message happens again, reboot the system. When the POST (memory checking) screen comes up, press F8 repeatedly. This will bring you to the Windows advanced options menu.
In the Windows advanced options menu choose 'safe mode' to attempt to boot into Windows Safe mode. Safe mode loads Windows XP with a minimal set of drivers and no automatically loaded software. If faulty software or drivers are causing your BSOD problem, safe mode should load correctly. If safe mode loads correctly, refer to Section A below on 'troubleshooting software stop messages.'
If safe mode does not load correctly, and/or you get the same stop message upon attempting safe mode, it's time to try the 'restore last known good configuration' option in the advanced options menu.
Restart your computer, pressing 'F8' again to load the advanced options menu and select 'last known good configuration (your most recent settings that worked).' This uses Windows XP's built in system restore utility to restore the most recent save point, which should be the last time you installed any drivers or other software. If your system boots normally after this operation, hopefully your problem has been fixed.
If you are still receiving a Blue Screen Of Death after the above procedures, or if system restore was disabled on your system, note down any new information on the error and start thinking. Did you install any new hardware or software just before this problem occurred? The driver information section of the BSOD may help with this.
If you did install new hardware or software, and you think you know what it might be that is causing the problem, this gives you a big boost in resolving the situation.
Otherwise, proceed to the advanced troubleshooting sections below. Chances are your error is hardware or system file based and will require more effort to repair.
Specific Repair Instructions
If you have a reoccurring Blue Screen Of Death or crashing problem, and can't use Windows effectively because of it, it's time to look at more specific methods of troubleshooting your problem. Depending on the results of the basic troubleshooting steps above, you should have a good idea of whether the problem that is causing the stop messages is related to software or drivers you have installed, or is a hardware or system file issue.
Essentially, if you can't boot into Windows XP safe mode because of crashes or Blue Screens Of Death, you likely either have a hardware error or one or more essential system files is corrupted or missing. If you can boot into Windows XP safe mode, but get constant or frequent BSOD's when running XP normally, you have a software or device driver problem.

Make sure that if you added any RAM to your computer which is a common cause for BSOD that you added the correct RAM for your computer and that it is equally distributed in the ports meaning each port for the RAM has the equal amount of RAM on each side (eg, one stick 1GB, and the other has 1GB, etc).

Jan 03, 2010 | Dell Dimension 2400 PC Desktop

2 Answers

My desk top computer is always crashing and dumping, and receiving blue screen. I will I solve this? OS is Windows Vista Black Edition with processor Intel Pentium Dual CPU E2140 @ 1.60 Ghz.


It could be a number of things. First, have tried reinstalling vista and installing the latest drivers for your hardware? You also might have a bad piece of hardware causing windows to crash. I would start by backing up all your files, downloading and saving all the latest drivers and doing a complete refromat and reinstall of vista. If you are unaware on how to do this, then I recommend taking the pc to a good repair place and having them do it for you.

Aug 07, 2009 | Computers & Internet

Tip

Things You Must Know To Avoid PC Crash Part 1



Fatal error: the system has become unstable or is busy," it says. "Enter to return to Windows or press Control-Alt-Delete to restart your computer. If you do this you will lose any unsaved information in all open applications."
You have just been struck by the Blue Screen of Death. Anyone who uses Mcft Windows will be familiar with this. What can you do? More importantly, how can you prevent it happening?
1 Hardware conflict
The number one reason why Windows crashes is hardware conflict. Each hardware device communicates to other devices through an interrupt request channel (IRQ). These are supposed to be unique for each device.
For example, a printer usually connects internally on IRQ 7. The keyboard usually uses IRQ 1 and the floppy disk drive IRQ 6. Each device will try to hog a single IRQ for itself.
If there are a lot of devices, or if they are not installed properly, two of them may end up sharing the same IRQ number. When the user tries to use both devices at the same time, a crash can happen. The way to check if your computer has a hardware conflict is through the following route:
* Start-Settings-Control Panel-System-Device Manager.
Often if a device has a problem a yellow '!' appears next to its description in the Device Manager. Highlight Computer (in the Device Manager) and press Properties to see the IRQ numbers used by your computer. If the IRQ number appears twice, two devices may be using it.
Sometimes a device might share an IRQ with something described as 'IRQ holder for PCI steering'. This can be ignored. The best way to fix this problem is to remove the problem device and reinstall it.
Sometimes you may have to find more recent drivers on the internet to make the device function properly. A good resource is www.driverguide.com. If the device is a soundcard, or a modem, it can often be fixed by moving it to a different slot on the motherboard (be careful about opening your computer, as you may void the warranty).
When working inside a computer you should switch it off, unplug the mains lead and touch an unpainted metal surface to discharge any static electricity.
To be fair to Mcft, the problem with IRQ numbers is not of its making. It is a legacy problem going back to the first PC designs using the IBM 8086 chip. Initially there were only eight IRQs. Today there are 16 IRQs in a PC. It is easy to run out of them. There are plans to increase the number of IRQs in future designs.
2 Bad Ram

Ram (random-access memory) problems might bring on the blue screen of death with a message saying Fatal Exception Error. A fatal error indicates a serious hardware problem. Sometimes it may mean a part is damaged and will need replacing.
But a fatal error caused by Ram might be caused by a mismatch of chips. For example, mixing 70-nanosecond (70ns) Ram with 60ns Ram will usually force the computer to run all the Ram at the slower speed. This will often crash the machine if the Ram is overworked.
One way around this problem is to enter the BIOS settings and increase the wait state of the Ram. This can make it more stable. Another way to troubleshoot a suspected Ram problem is to rearrange the Ram chips on the motherboard, or take some of them out. Then try to repeat the circumstances that caused the crash. When handling Ram try not to touch the gold connections, as they can be easily damaged.
Parity error messages also refer to Ram. Modern Ram chips are either parity (ECC) or non parity (non-ECC). It is best not to mix the two types, as this can be a cause of trouble.
EMM386 error messages refer to memory problems but may not be connected to bad Ram. This may be due to free memory problems often linked to old Dos-based programmes.
3 BIOS settings
Every motherboard is supplied with a range of chipset settings that are decided in the factory. A common way to access these settings is to press the F2 or delete button during the first few seconds of a boot-up.
Once inside the BIOS, great care should be taken. It is a good idea to write down on a piece of paper all the settings that appear on the screen. That way, if you change something and the computer becomes more unstable, you will know what settings to revert to.
A common BIOS error concerns the CAS latency. This refers to the Ram. Older EDO (extended data out) Ram has a CAS latency of 3. Newer SDRam has a CAS latency of 2. Setting the wrong figure can cause the Ram to lock up and freeze the computer's display.
Mcft Windows is better at allocating IRQ numbers than any BIOS. If possible set the IRQ numbers to Auto in the BIOS. This will allow Windows to allocate the IRQ numbers (make sure the BIOS setting for Plug and Play OS is switched to 'yes' to allow Windows to do this.).

on Feb 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

The recovery CD just created a black screen


if your comuter still boots(which it should)... repeat the process again. sometimes errors happen with older installation disks.

Aug 05, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Inspiron B130 Blue Screen Error message UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME Will not open in safe mode, cannot access computer hardware to disable or remove any hardware - haven't downloaded or added any new hardware...


Problem is with your hard drive. You usually get that message when it crashes or is failing.

I'd suggest taking it to a local repair shop to confirm this.

Sorry.


Feb 25, 2009 | HP Compaq d530 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Motherboard


Sounds like you tried everything except reseating any other hardware that may or may not be placed in another socket such as PCI, AGP, etc... Like a Modem, Network adapter, Sound/Graphics card, Wireless card, etc... This is probably a wasted post as if you knew to check each stick of memory seperatly then you've probably already reseated all socketed hardware. Though, you could remove all non essential hardware such as I mentioned above and try installing Windows again?
Good luck and keep us posted.

Sep 06, 2008 | Dell Dimension 8400 PC Desktop

1 Answer

System failure blue screen,error message. used recovery disks successfully. updated computer and service pack 2. i shut down computer and restarted it and it crashed again. redid recovery/formatting...


Usually a device driver wrong. Check hardware divices. If yellow with exclamation driver needs to be loaded ith correct driver before next crash. Then reboot and test.

Feb 28, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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