Question about Maytag Dryers

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Just replaced the impeller and oiled the bearings on the motor; they were making a constant squeal when the motor was rotated one direction (not the other). got it back together and when I push the start button, there is a short (1 sec?) 'noise', like the belt slipping maybe, then it goes fine. But with clothes in it, it won't start turning. I am not sure how freely the tub is supposed to spin; my only guess is that it isn't turning freely enough. (I did have the drum and the motor out for the maint work I did). thoughts?

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Posted on Mar 08, 2009

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
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the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
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How to fix squeal in a Maytag airconditioner


no belt. should be a direct drive motor. most likely bearings in motor going out. you will have to replace motor at some point it will lock up. if it has oil ports you can try oiling to prolong but will eventually stop working.

Aug 30, 2012 | Maytag M6Y18F7A Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Squealing on wash very load on spin clunking


I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.



  1. Unplug the washer.
  2. Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.
  3. Tip the washer back toward the wall.
  4. Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.
  5. Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).
  6. Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)
  7. Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.
  8. Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.
  9. Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.
  10. Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.
  11. Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.
  12. Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.
  13. Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.
  14. Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.
  15. Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!
  16. Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.
  17. Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.
  18. Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.
  19. Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!
  20. Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.
  21. Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.
  22. Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.
  23. Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.
  24. Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.
  25. Test out your fix with your helper and...
  26. If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!
  27. If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Mar 10, 2011 | Fisher and Paykel GWL11 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

Washing is squealing during filling process??


I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.

  1. Unplug the washer.
  2. Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.
  3. Tip the washer back toward the wall.
  4. Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.
  5. Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).
  6. Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)
  7. Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.
  8. Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.
  9. Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.
  10. Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.
  11. Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.
  12. Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.
  13. Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.
  14. Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.
  15. Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!
  16. Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.
  17. Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.
  18. Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.
  19. Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!
  20. Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.
  21. Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.
  22. Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.
  23. Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.
  24. Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.
  25. Test out your fix with your helper and...
  26. If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!
  27. If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Feb 28, 2011 | Fisher and Paykel GWL11 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

Moderl# GWL11 washmachine, approx 3-4 yrs old. Makes Squeeling noise when it starts, lasts about 30 seconds. Also noticed that the basket is sitting almost 1" from top (compared to new ones in store)


I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.

Unplug the washer.

Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.

Tip the washer back toward the wall.

Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.

Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).

Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)

Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.

Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.

Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.

Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.

Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.

Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.

Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.

Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.

Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!

Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.

Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.

Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.

Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!

Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.

Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.

Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.

Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.

Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.

Test out your fix with your helper and...

If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!

If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Jan 18, 2011 | Fisher and Paykel GWL11 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

Machine makes a fairly loud squeeling noise for about a minute when water begins to recirculate at beginning of cycle


I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.

  1. Unplug the washer.
  2. Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.
  3. Tip the washer back toward the wall.
  4. Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.
  5. Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).
  6. Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)
  7. Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.
  8. Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.
  9. Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.
  10. Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.
  11. Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.
  12. Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.
  13. Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.
  14. Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.
  15. Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!
  16. Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.
  17. Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.
  18. Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.
  19. Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!
  20. Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.
  21. Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.
  22. Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.
  23. Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.
  24. Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.
  25. Test out your fix with your helper and...
  26. If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!
  27. If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Jan 09, 2011 | Fisher and Paykel GWL11 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

GWL11 loud squeel/screeching noise while filling and durring wash... previous answer say spray pimp with WD 40. Question - where on the pump, or in the pump do you spray? Are we certain it is a pump and...


Do not use WD-40! It attacks the impeller seal!



I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.

  1. Unplug the washer.
  2. Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.
  3. Tip the washer back toward the wall.
  4. Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.
  5. Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).
  6. Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)
  7. Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.
  8. Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.
  9. Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.
  10. Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.
  11. Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.
  12. Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.
  13. Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.
  14. Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.
  15. Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!
  16. Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.
  17. Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.
  18. Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.
  19. Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!
  20. Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.
  21. Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.
  22. Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.
  23. Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.
  24. Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.
  25. Test out your fix with your helper and...
  26. If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!
  27. If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Dec 27, 2010 | Fisher and Paykel GWL11 Top Load Washer

1 Answer

Wash machine makes squealing sound


I found that my squeal was coming from the little rubber boot that seals the pump from the impeller.



I silenced the squeal as follows...



Give it a try. It might work for you, too. It takes about 30 minutes.

  1. Unplug the washer.
  2. Pull it away from the wall a foot or two.
  3. Tip the washer back toward the wall.
  4. Have a strong, reliable helper hold the washer in that position -- firmly against the wall.
  5. Get down on the floor. Lie on your back and put your head and arm under the washer (that's why you need a good helper!).
  6. Unplug the electrical wiring to the pump. (The GWL11 has 2 wiring connectors.)
  7. Slide a shallow plastic dishpan under the pump to catch any water.
  8. Find and bend back slightly (don't break it!) the plastic retaining latch that holds the pump in place.
  9. Rotate the pump counter-clockwise about 60 degrees, until it comes free.
  10. Note the angle/position of the pump as you pull it free. This is the same angle/position you'll need when you put it back in, of course.
  11. Get out from under the washer -- with the pump, of course.
  12. Have your helper lower the washer to the floor.
  13. Have your helper clean up any excess water that runs onto the floor.
  14. Put the pump on a well-lit table or other surface covered with newspaper.
  15. Using a straight blade screwdriver, pry directly underneath the plastic fan (right up against the shaft) to carefully and slowly work it off. Don't lose the small plastic fan bushing!! - which is actually what you are prying against. Also, as you remove the fan and bushing from the shaft, note carefully how the bushing fits on the shaft. There is a right way and a wrong way to put it back!
  16. Now, you are ready to remove the motor/shaft/impeller assembly from the bearings/windings assembly. But first!! Find on the white plastic impeller frame the locking tab that was engaged with the latch in step 8 above - and put a piece of tape on the black bearing/windings assembly to mark the tab's position for reassembly.
  17. Using a 7mm socket (or end) wrench, remove the 2 bolts holding the impeller/shaft assembly to the bearings/windings assembly.
  18. Carefully pull the impeller/shaft assembly from the bearings/windings.
  19. Spray the bearings with a high-quality silicone lubricant. Buy a small can. It is worth it. Do not use WD-40 or 3-in-1 Oil!
  20. Using toothpicks, Q-tips, and paper towels, clean any dust, dirt, and hair from the bearings.
  21. Spray the impeller shaft and rubber boot inside the white plastic framework with silicone lubricant.
  22. Using toothpicks and bits of paper towel, clean the shaft around the boot. Move the shaft back and forth a few millimeters to compact the dusty, hairy crud - so you can spear it with a toothpick and pull it away. Using a toothpick, stuff a shred of paper towel inside the white plastic framework and rotate the shaft. Remove the dirty paper towel shred. Spray more silicone onto shaft and boot. Repeat this cleaning process until paper towel comes out clean. It is a little like building a ship in a bottle - but quite doable.
  23. Once everything is clean as a whistle, put a spritz of silicone lubricant in each sleeve bearing and on the impeller shaft near the rubber boot.
  24. Re-assemble everything in the reverse order starting with step 18 above.
  25. Test out your fix with your helper and...
  26. If no squeal, bask in the glow of gratitude and self-confidence!
  27. If it still squeals, order a new pump.

BTW - Cleaning all dust out from under the washer a couple times a year should help prevent pump squealing in the future.

Dec 07, 2010 | Fisher Paykel EcoSmart GWL15

1 Answer

My maytag model no.mav4755aww makes a whinning sound at the beginning of the spin cycle


Hi
Drum bearing failure is common when the bearing seals start allowing water to enter. You can take the belt off and spin the drum by hand, and if the drum rumbles, replace the bearings.Since you hear whining it means that the bearing is damaged and the seals on bearing are gone too so it rotates without lubricant. It might be possible to hear whining while you rotate empty drum manually...
Turn the drum by hand and listen for loud noises. If the drum itself is split or the 'spider' is corroded, broken or has come apart from the back of the drum it will create a loud noise on every turn of the drum. When the bearings have gone bad, the noise is constant the entire time the drum is spinning.
Take the belt off and run the motor alone if you hear a high pitched squealing noise to check for motor bearing damage or wear. If you still hear the noise without the belt, it's the motor bearing.Then replacing the bearing is suggested.
Let us know if you want something more else accept the solution.
Thanks for contacting fixya.com

May 22, 2010 | Washing Machines

2 Answers

Hi my old Honeywell 13520 has acquired a periodic squeal. I am sure it is a motor issue. Any way to tune up these little motors? (Brushes, etc..)


Usually if the motor is squealing, the bearings are dry no lubrication and worn. If you have oil ports you can oil it and quiet it down for a while. Most motors now have self lubricated or oil impregnated bearings, which you can't lubricate. It costs as much for somebody to replace the bearings, as it does for a new motor. Most people replace the motor.

Nov 17, 2009 | Honeywell Enviracaire 13520 Air Purifier

2 Answers

My washer has started making a high-pitched noise while spinning.


Hi
to chek what is wrong follow the bellow instruction....
Check the motor bearings
If your washing machine is making a high-pitched whine or squealing noise while running, the main culprit is usually worn motor bearings. To check the motor bearings, remove the belt and run the motor by itself, listening for the noise. If it makes the noise, than the problem is most likely the result of worn motor bearings and has nothing to do with issues in the rest of the washer.
Check for Obstructions
Sometimes coins, bra underwires and other metal objects come loose in the wash and become stuck between the tub and the drum. Using a flashlight, take a good look inside the washing machine. If you see dents, scratches or dings, that's a sign that there either are or have been items bouncing around in there that can make a horrible racket.
Check for Grease Spatter
A high-pitched squealing can be caused when the grease thins around the bearing that's located under the tub. Open up the washing machine and check the interior for grease spatters or spots. That could mean that the grease has thinned out around the bearing and it's making the noise because of rubbing.
Check the Drum for Irregularities
Spin the drum by hand, listening for the noise. If it makes the noise in the same spot with each rotation, the problem could be with the washing machine drum itself. Parts of the drum can corrode over time, leaving it vulnerable to cracks or rust.

Thanks for contacting fixya.com

Nov 13, 2009 | Kenmore Washing Machines

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