Question about Acer Aspire 9410 Notebook

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Broken power port (dc jack)

I tripped over the cat, bumped my laptop and it fell off the coffee table. It landed on the side that has where the AC power adapter fits into the DC jack (hole) and it broke the DC jack on the inside of the laptop case. I'm trying to open the laptop up to get to the power port to assess the damage but the repair manual pdf doesn't explain how to get to it. It says to remove the middle cover but doesn't say how to do this. I've tried to pry it up but something is holding it there and I don't want to force it as I would probably have to replace two broken pieces instead of one. Do I have to go a different way then removing the keyboard? Do I need to remove the back cover instead?

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Whenever I replace dc jacks, MAJORITY of the time the entire computer needs to be taken apart down to the motherboard.

Usually I just remove every screw that I see and then carefully start to pry pieces off the laptop. Don't force anything though, everything should come apart with minimal effort, as long as the screws are out.

If you're going to attempt this repair yourself you're gonna need to set aside about two hours to complete it.

You'll need:

a soldering gun
solder
solder wick

Make sure you have a big, flat, clean workspace to work on.

If you have a camera it might help to take pictures along the way. At the very least keep track of where the screws go.

I usually separate them into two categories: outside the laptop and inside the laptop.

It's not the easiest thing to repair for the home user but you can do it if you've got the patience.

Hope this helps.

Best of luck!


Hope this info helps.

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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1 Answer

Wire my ac jack for my samsung np365e5c


The AC adaptor goes into the AC socket, NOT the computer connection. The Computer connection is DC and comes from the DC side of the Adaptor. If you mean the DC socket has broken, then you need someone to replace it inside the computer.
If the AC adaptor has failed, you can buy a replacement ( 19V 3.16A 60W AC Adapter).
See the Manual
http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/201408/20140829115137641/Win7_Manual_eng.pdf

Feb 23, 2015 | Samsung Computers & Internet

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My laptop charging port is not working problem. I have to wiggle it about and selotape it into place for the computer to charge. What do you think is the most likely cause the port its self or the charger?


I think it is because of the loose dc jack. So
You need to get the DC Power Jack Either Repaired or replaced...this is the "female" port where your AC Power cord plugs into.. To Repair the current DC Jack...First you'll need to look closely at the Positive posts to see that they are not broken.. If visibally ok.. then you can look at the Solder Connections.. they will need to first be Desoldered.. Cleaned, then Resoldered back in place....
http://www.chargerbuy.com/laptop-ac-adapter/samsung-compatibility.html

Oct 29, 2012 | Samsung Rv511

1 Answer

Charging light wont come on


A) AC adapter (Charger) is bad.
Use a multimeter, and check it out.

[ DC Voltage.
Test plug of cable that plugs into laptop.
Positive (Red) probe lead of multimeter, to Center Hole of plug on AC adapter.
Negative (Black) probe lead touches outside cylindrical metal shell.
You should read close to 19.5 Volts (DC) ]

AC adapter checks out OK?

B) DC Power Jack is bad

[The DC Power Jack is the port on the laptop, that the AC adapter plugs into. On laptop may be marked DC_IN ]

Damage to DC Power Jack prevents laptop from charging, or running strictly off of the AC adapter.

Battery removed take a No.2 pencil's eraser, and see if you can gently move the Center Pin, of the DC Power Jack.
ANY perceptible movement means replacement of the DC Power Jack.

The pin itself may not move, and the entire jack moves.
The good news is the DC Power Jack is not soldered to the motherboard.
It is soldered to a separate, therefore replaceable, small circuit board,

http://www.parts-people.com/index.php?action=item&id=3698

Click to enlarge. In the photo the DC Power Jack is at the back on the right.
This is is what the DC Power Jack, looks like not installed on that small circuit board,

http://www.elept.com/dc-power-jack-for-dell-inspiron-xps-m140-m1710-m1210-m2010_p2971.html

Looking at the view on the right, note the pins sticking out.
You are looking at the back view, and the jack is laying on it's side.
The pins go through the laptop's motherboard, and are soldered to the motherboard.

Where the pins are soldered to the motherboard is a solder connection. Commonly referred to as a Solder Joint.

Plugging in, and missing the hole of the jack, can cause the AC adapter plug to damage the DC Power Jack, by bumping into it.

Bumping into the plug of the AC adapter, while plugged into the DC Power jack, can cause damage to the jack.

Can cause cracking of the above mentioned solder joints. This leads to an intermittent contact, and eventually no contact, of the DC Power Jack TO the motherboard.

In this case the solder joints are just re-soldered.

Damage to the body of the jack itself means replacement of the DC Power Jack, or replacement of the USB/DC Power Jack circuit board, itself.

(Unless you, or an acquaintance can un-solder, and solder real well, the option may be to just replace the USB/DC Power Jack circuit board)

DC Power Jack proves to be OK?

Problem is one, or more Power MOSFETs on the motherboard.
These determine if the Battery needs a trickle charge, or a full charge, or no charge at all.
Also determines if the laptop is to just run off of the AC adapter, and not the Battery.

This example is for HP Pavilion dv6000 and Pavilion dv9000 series of Notebook PC's. You can use it for cross-reference information.
(Location of the Power MOSFETs on your laptop's motherboard. General idea of what they look like ),

http://mayohardware.blogspot.com/2010/04/important-parts-on-dv6000-and-dv9000.html

What? Looks like motherboard replacement to you?
OK
Let's price a Fairchild Semiconductor International - FDS6679 - Power MOSFET,

http://www.mouser.com/Search/Refine.aspx?Keyword=FDS6679

If you buy one the cost is $1.01 USD

Look to see if the Power MOSFET/s are burned. Blackened, bubbled, or blistered.

There is one more small component, that if bad will produce the same results;
Ceramic Capacitors.

Look back at the Mayohardware blog. Look at the second photo down with the AO4407 Power MOSFET circled in Yellow.

Note the small rectangular shape to the immediate right, that has the wide dark band on it. There is one above it, one above that, and one to the right of the top one.

See if any of these, (No matter what the size. Look at all of them), are burned. Blackened, bubbled, or blistered.

http://www.mouser.com/Passive-Components/Capacitors/Ceramic-Capacitors/Multilayer-Ceramic-Capacitors-MLCC-SMD-SMT/_/N-b2cj?P=1z0wquyZ1z0t6fg

NOT stating these are ones to use. Just showing average cost.
.42 to .76 cents USD. Approximately a half dollar to three-quarters of a dollar.

Motherboard?

Average example,

http://www.amazon.com/Dell-Inspiron-M140-Motherboard-HC425/dp/B001155N0U


$200 USD

Average example of the -> package type of the Power MOSFETs used,

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:oER5NNz8cwcJ:www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/FD/FDS6675BZ.pdf+Fairchild+FDS6675BZ&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShOhWPjm_M-ROHme4iEMrztCTOd-28jNiy1hVLQQh_VOyv8zcXEVDB_iTQA6MuZO88UmRkDgjyW9j4CP2aIJ-4DS-h6JNM3lvxldeApQeecmz_DADCw1s7tmNLxfPknqX14SZP6&sig=AHIEtbS_rYUAeo_8rB9YHkW05ZjLqeH4Jg


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uiroWBkdFY&feature=fvwrel

You don't need a Soldering Station. A low Wattage soldering iron, and that tip.

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/xps140M/en/sm/index.htm

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Dell Inspiron XPS M140 Notebook

1 Answer

No power on my samsung rv510


Zinzee, check the AC adapter first. (Charger)
Wiggle the power cord from AC adapter to surge protector.
See if the AC adapter LED power on light, blinks.
Yes? Bad power cord.

No change?
Go on.

The port on your laptop that the AC adapter plugs into, is the DC Power Jack.
Wiggle the cable from DC Power Jack to AC adapter.
Power On LED light up, or blink?

Change? New AC adapter. (Also need to check DC Power Jack center pin, to ensure problem is cable, not DC Power jack)
No Change?
Go on.

Unplug the AC adapter from the surge protector. You will need a multimeter now.
An economical multimeter can be purchased for as little as $5 to $12. Available at a multitude of stores. An auto parts store is but one example. (Not for $5 probably )

The Function Knob is set to DC Voltage. (DCV)
If just a symbol it is a dotted line over a solid line.

The center hole in the plug of the cable that goes to the DC Power Jack, is the Positive connection. This is where the RED probe lead (Positive), of the multimeter goes to.

The outside cylindrical metal shell of the plug is the Negative connection. This is what the BLACK probe lead (Negative), touches against.

You should read very close to 19 Volts (DC)

Have an assistant wiggle the AC adapter cable to DC Power Jack.
AC adapter is good? No intermittent reading on multimeter?
Go on.

Remove the Battery. Take a No.2 pencil, and use the eraser to GENTLY, see if you can wiggle the center pin around, of the DC Power Jack in the laptop. (DC_IN)

ANY perceptible movement means a problem with the DC Power Jack.

http://www.amazon.com/POWER-SOCKET-CONNECTOR-SAMSUNG-SERIES/dp/B008AGK43O

Chose link for the 4 views of the DC Power Jack.
Underneath the large Main view, there are 4 smaller views. Click on the one all the way to the right.
This is a view of the Back of the DC Power Jack, and the side that faces in on the laptop.

Note the L-shaped prongs on each side of the jack. These go down into the motherboard, and are soldered to the motherboard.
The 3 vertical lugs you see on the back, are the power, and Ground connections for the jack, and are also connected to the motherboard.

1) The center pin of the jack mounts to the jack's body, like a rivet. It is squished on the back, and this holds it in place.
Very easy to break that mount, and loosen the center pin.

2) The connections on the back are soldered, as previously stated, as are the 'L prongs' on the sides. Solder connections are also known as Solder Joints. If the jack moves with the pencil, and it seems to not just be the center pin, one or more of these solder joints could be cracked. (Broken)

Number 1 above means P-r-o-p-e-r-ly removing the DC Power Jack, and properly soldering a new one in.

Number 2 above just means re-soldering cracked solder joints.

DC Power Jack proves to be good?
Go on.

At this point those who use the moniker 'Technician', but in reality aren't a tech, will want to replace the motherboard.
In reality the Power MOSFET's should be checked, to see if they are good.

IMHO a $4 to $5 P.MOSFET (Or two of them), is much cheaper than a $200 motherboard.
Of course if there is $125 to $150 in labor, the savings isn't that great.

Buy an ESD wrist strap, connect it's alligator clip to a good ground source, remove the motherboard, buy the DC Power Jack, and take both to the tech. Should be about $50 labor, or less to replace the Power MOSFET/s. (May not be both of them, just one)

http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103245

[ I connect to an unpainted surface, of the metal frame of an open, empty desktop computer case.
You can also set a large metal serving tray (Unpainted), on the table you are working on, or a large metal knickknack (Unpainted), and connect to it ]

No Zinzee I do not know what manufacturer, and manufacturer number, of P.MOSFET's are used on your Samsung.
I DO KNOW;

1) They us J-leads on the bottom.
Examples,

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:oER5NNz8cwcJ:www.fairchildsemi.com/ds/FD/FDS6675BZ.pdf+Fairchild+FDS6675BZ&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShOhWPjm_M-ROHme4iEMrztCTOd-28jNiy1hVLQQh_VOyv8zcXEVDB_iTQA6MuZO88UmRkDgjyW9j4CP2aIJ-4DS-h6JNM3lvxldeApQeecmz_DADCw1s7tmNLxfPknqX14SZP6&sig=AHIEtbS_rYUAeo_8rB9YHkW05ZjLqeH4Jg

http://www.siliconfareast.com/soic.htm

They are located near the DC Power Jack on the motherboard, usually. Example using HP dv6000 and dv9000 series laptops,

http://mayohardware.blogspot.com/2010/04/important-parts-on-dv6000-and-dv9000.html

Using Fairchild FDS6679 Power MOSFET as an example,

http://www.ic2ic.com/search.jsp?sSearchWord=FDS6679

$2.74 US

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 07, 2012 | Samsung Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Broken power plugin port


The power plug in port you refer to is the DC Power Jack.

The AC adapter (Charger) converts AC electricity into DC electricity.
DC electricity has two poles. Positive, and Negative.
(Just like on a D cell flashlight battery)

The center pin of the DC Power Jack is the Positive connection.
The outer metal spring-like pieces, on the inside of the cylindrical shape surrounding the center pin, are the Negative connection.
(The pieces of spring-like metal, all connect to the Negative connection in the DC Power Jack)

Example of a replacement DC Power Jack, for the Asus Eee PC 1005HA Netbook,

http://www.batterysupport.com/asus-eee-pc-1005ha-jack-p-303527.html

[ Note*
Cannot agree with the replacement instructions they offer, at the bottom of the page.
Not everyone has access to a hot-air gun. A 25 Watt soldering iron, and Desoldering Braid, is better, and more easily accessed ]

A few articles dealing with replacement of a DC Power Jack,

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2007/12/06/dc-power-jack-repair-guide/

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2006/01/28/toshiba-satellite-m35x-a75-power-jack-problem/

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2006/05/27/failed-laptop-power-jack-workaround/

1) Remove ALL power. Remove the AC adapter, (Charger), and Battery.
2) Observe Anti-Static Precautions. Buy, and use an ESD wrist strap.
Electro Static Discharge.

(Average cost is from $3 to $6. Connect the alligator clip to a good ground source.
I connect to an unpainted surface, of the metal frame of an open, empty desktop computer case.

If you wish to proceed in replacing your DC Power Jack, and need guidance, post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Dec 01, 2011 | ASUS Eee PC 1005HA-PU1X-BK Netbook

1 Answer

Acer laptop


The DC Jack is the socket into which the power cable plugs into your notebook. If it has come loose the the solder points connecting the jack to the motherboard have broken contact and that is why the notebook is not charging. A loose DC jack is not suitable for DIY repair unless you are experienced in internal notebook repairs and have all the right equipment.
The only way to get this fault repaired is for a professional notebook repair technician to completely disassemble the notebook and then either re-solder the original jack back into place or install and solder in a new replacement jack before reassembling the notebook. Because of the skill and time it takes to disassemble repair and reassemble a notebook, repairing a loose DC jack can be expensive, but if you look around you should be able to find an experienced notebook repair center that will do it for $50-$75 and give you a warranty as well.
A DC jack often become loose if it is allowed to directly bear the deadweight of the heavy AC/DC Adapter on the power cable or the cable catches on something wile connected to the notebook. the AC/DC Adapter should lie full weight on the floor during charging. If the cable is not long enough for the heavy AC/DC Adapter to reach the floor, then it should be lifted it up and placed on the desk or table beside the notebook. Any cable length problems should be solved by using a surge-protected power extension cable. Also, a notebook should never be carried around when its power cable is attached to it.

Nov 11, 2011 | Acer Aspire One PC Notebook

5 Answers

MY GATEWAY LAPTOP NO LONGER RECEIVES POWER.


Motherboard or harddrive? I'm betting it's more towards the motherboard. The DC Power Jack to be more specific. This is the port where the AC adapter, (Charger), plug is plugged into.

The DC Power Jack is not much bigger, than the plug for the AC adapter that plugs into it. There are small pin leads that are on the bottom of this jack, and they go through the motherboard, and are soldered to the motherboard.

Accidental bumping of the AC adapter plug, while plugged into the DC Power Jack, can damage the jack. It can break the connections for the adapter plug, and/or can crack the solder joints for those small pin leads.

[Laptops use DC electricity. A flashlight battery, and a laptop battery, are examples of stored DC electricity. DC electricity has two poles. Positive and Negative. The DC Power Jack has two connections. Positive and Negative. {Even if the DC Power Jack has multiple holes in it]

There is also another known problem associated with DC Power Jacks. It may stem from a bad motherboard design.

More to the point, the area where the DC Power Jack mounts on the motherboard. In this design, the DC Power Jack motherboard area, is almost a separate part of the motherboard. It's shaped like a Peninsula. (Think of an island, with one side connected to the mainland)

This peninsula shape, has the tendency to crack away from the main body of the motherboard. Circuit traces are broken.

When the AC adapter plug is setting in a certain position, it presses the two broken halves of the circuit traces together, for a momentary contact. As the AC adapter plug is moved from this position, the circuit trace halves are moved apart, and there is no contact.

(No distribution of electricity from one circuit trace half, to the other circuit trace half. Think of a circuit trace as a very, thin, flat copper wire. When a circuit trace is broken, there is essentially a wire that is broken into two parts)

Solution?
See if the DC Power Jack can be repaired, (Solder joint connections re-soldered), or replaced.
If the DC Power Jack motherboard area is the aforementioned peninsula shape, it may require replacement of the motherboard.

There are very FEW, computer repair shops that have the technical expertise to replace a DC Power Jack. Easy fix is to simply replace the motherboard. (More $$$$$ too)

However, some laptops DO require replacement of the motherboard for this repair.
Bad motherboard design, for the DC Power Jack area on the motherboard.

Re-solder DC Power Jack solder joints? (IF, this is the problem) Average is $50 to $75 (US)
Replace DC Power Jack? Average is $125 to $150. (US)
Replace motherboard? Depends on the Gateway model. Could be $225 to $400 (US)

[Yes, most of the time the cost warrants just replacing the laptop itself, as the cost of replacing, is close to the repair cost)

Just to SHOW you ab average DC Power Jack, and the repair involved of replacing. (Doesn't show you, that the entire laptop needs to be disassembled, down to the bare motherboard in hand)

This is NOT a recommendation to replace the DC Power Jack yourself! It is just for knowledge of what is partially involved. (You can accidentally burn the motherboard when desoldering, or soldering, rendering the motherboard useless)

http://www.laptoprepair101.com/laptop/2007/12/06/dc-power-jack-repair-guide/

Sep 09, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Notebook won't power up with AC Adapter plugged in


your header for adaptor has worn out, or your AC adaptor had gone out. you can buy a UNIVERSAL adaptor which will fit any laptop from Newegg, fry's, office stores, etc. is a new adaptor does not work then you have to replace inside header. you can try taking a small knife and using it rub around inside to try to "revive" contacts. it is an expensive replacement cost

Apr 26, 2009 | Toshiba Satellite A15-S157 Notebook

3 Answers

Intermittent dc jack connection for Gateway mx3215


Here is how to disassemble Gateway laptop,

Here is replacement DC socket (needs soldering),

Here is DC board (no need soldering, but expensive).

Hope this helps.

Mar 17, 2009 | Gateway MX3215 Notebook

1 Answer

Compaq Presario 1200 won't charge battery


dear N9YK

you can follow this

If you have a loose connection where you plug in the power on your laptop, or it works intermittently, you could have a bad dc jack. Symptoms
  • Move the power plug and the laptop loses connection
  • Broken or cracked dc jack
  • Laptop won't charge but worked on battery
  • Power LED and battery LED flicker when the adapter tip is moved
  • Battery won't charge
  • Sparks come out the back of the laptop
Why does this happen?
  • Flaw in manufacturer designs
  • Use of universal or non-original ac adapter
  • Lots of plugging and unplugging of the ac adapter
  • Tripping on or pulling the ac adapter cord
or you can check your dc amper in your adaptor

oke



thx

cropp

Mar 16, 2008 | Compaq Presario 1200 Notebook

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