Question about Refrigerators

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Why doesn't my fridge cool?

I have a two door fridge that is 7 year old Frigidaire. My heater/defroster broke and damaged the evaporator coil in the process. I had the hole repaired, vacuumed and refilled with Freon. It won't cool the fridge. The technician said it is possible that there is a blockage with water in the very thin copper pipe connected to the coil. He suggested to turn the compressor on and off so it might push the clog to the filter. Does anybody have any suggestions on how to fix it?

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While I agree with your technician that there may be a blockage in the coil or more likely the capillary tube but turning it off and on will not fix it. to fix this correctly the evpaporator, heat exchanger, compressor and filter drier need to be replaced as well as the condenser and mullion loop need to be flushed.
when the defrost heater failed and the refrigerant escaped the unit pulled moisture into the system causing this blockage and it will cause a lot of other troubles such as acid build up in the system if not repaired properly.
I know this is not what you wanted to hear because this will be very expensive to repair. If I can be of further assistance please ask thanks Peyton

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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The fan is working. The fridge, freezer & coils are not iced up. There is good room for air circulation. I vacuumed most of the dust from the coils, etc. The compressor is just slightly warm to the...


Good day to you sir John,


A refrigerator or freezer that doesn't cool well enough may have a problem with its evaporator coils, condenser, or condenser fan motor. Frost build-up on evaporator coils, or condenser coils that are covered with dirt, dust, or lint can reduce how well a refrigerator can cool. If you notice ice getting thicker on the inside walls, inside bottom, or inside ceiling of the freezer, you have what is called a frost build-up. The problem is either with warm, moist air getting in through an old inefficient door gasket or the defrost system. Self-defrosting refrigerators have coils and a cooling fan that need to be cleaned regularly. If the coils get coated with any contaminants, they may not cool the refrigerator properly. The coils are usually thin and black and they go through fins that dissipate heat, just like a car's radiator. They are located behind the lower kick-panel or on the back of the refrigerator. To clean them, turn the power off and use this condenser coil cleaning brush, or this condenser coil cleaning brush, and your vacuum cleaner. Even if your coils are below the refrigerator, you won't be able to get to all the condenser coils from the front, so it's a good idea to pull the refrigerator out and clean the coils from the front and the rear of the refrigerator. Give the fan a dusting as well. Sometimes other things can be the reason behind poor cooling, like the condenser fan motor. Anytime the freezer fan is running, the condenser fan should also be running.
A frost build-up inside the refrigerator usually means that there is a problem in the self-defrost system. You may even have damaged door gaskets. When you open the refrigerator door, you also let in a blast of warm, often humid air. This moisture usually freezes onto the evaporator coils immediately. Self-defrost refrigerators are supposed to self-defrost between two and four times out of every 24 hour time-frame. They basically turn off for a few minutes several times a day. A defrost heater kicks on to melt any frost build-up on these coils, which allows the frost and ice to melt, then it drains off to the pan underneath most refrigerators. Unfortunately, when a defrost component fails, too much frost builds up on the evaporator coils. When this happens, the circulating fan can't draw air over these coils. With no air flow over the evaporator coils, the refrigerator compartment will lose its cool.
To determine if the self defrost system is faulty, it's best to remove all the food from the refrigerator and freezer, turn your thermostat to the Off setting, and just leave the doors open for 24 to 48 hours, and let the refrigerator defrost. Keep an eye out for an overflow of water from the drip pan on the bottom of the refrigerator.
After everything has completely melted away, set the thermostat back to a regular setting. If your refrigerator starts operating properly, the symptoms lead to there being a problem with one of three other components in the self-defrosting system, the defrost heater, the defrost timer, or the defrost thermostat.
If, after testing these components, the refrigerator still doesn't get your foods cool, there may be a problem with the refrigerant level and you will need to contact a professional appliance repair person.

I hope this solution will be helpful...

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Oct 23, 2011 | Frigidaire PLHT217TA Top Freezer...

1 Answer

The freezer is not getting cold enough. The unit is running. I cleaned all the coils and everything around them. Was told to unplug and let thaw out for a day.


Hi,

Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 - Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan - Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper - Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils - Check to see that the condenser coils don't have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor - Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 - Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 - Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 - Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven't got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn't work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.

I hope this will help in solving the problem....

May 10, 2011 | Frigidaire 20.6 cu. ft. Top Freezer...

1 Answer

I have a two year old frigidaire wine refrigerator that stopped cooling after we moved.


Hello,

Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 – Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system
problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.

Good luck in solving the problem.....

Aug 15, 2010 | Frigidaire Refrigerators

1 Answer

The refrigerator is not getting cold


Hello,

Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 – Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.


Hope this helpout....

Aug 15, 2010 | Frigidaire Refrigerators

1 Answer

FRIDGE IS NOT COOLING


hello,

Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 – Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.


Good luck.....

Aug 14, 2010 | Frigidaire Refrigerators

1 Answer

Not gettin cold


Hello,


Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 – Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.

Hope this helpout.....

Aug 09, 2010 | Frigidaire Refrigerators

1 Answer

Not keeping cold enough reading 26 degrees in freezer and 50 degrees in refriger lower area.clean condenser coil by blowing out area fan at conderser is working compresser working cold air blowing out in...


Hello,

Insufficient cooling is a fridge repair job that you can do without the help of a professional. Often the fridge has a frost-free failure, or the compressor is faulty but there are many other reasons for a fridge not cooling properly.
Step 1 – Find the Problem

Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.
Good luck, Hope this helpout.....

Aug 07, 2010 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

Freezer is cold, ice maker not making ice and refrig. part not cooling.


Hello,


Your first job is to locate the source of the problem. Consider each of the following:

* Gaskets - Make sure the gaskets/seals are not torn and are sealing properly.
* Evaporator fan – Make sure it is working. If it is now working you may have a problem with the fan motor. Check for power to the motor and also examine the fan switches around the door (not all fridges have these switches).
* Air damper – Sometimes the air damper will not open up to allow the cold air from the freezer part to blow into the fridge section.
* Condenser coils – Check to see that the condenser coils don’t have a dust build-up and that the condenser motor is working.
* Compressor – Make sure your compressor is working with on and off clicking noises.

Step 2 – Frost-Free Failure

This is the most common cooling problem in fridges. Expose the evaporator coils by accessing the panel in the freezer section. The coils in the freezer section can sometimes get clogged up with frost. This can stop the evaporator fan motor from blowing cold air around, or cause the fan to hit it and stop, or become noisy. The defrost timer can be a bit tricky to find but it is usually located behind the back bottom corners of the fridge, although they can sometimes be found in the ceiling of the fresh food section, or behind the cold control cover.
Step 3 – Find the Timer

When you find the timer, turn the wheel-like screw slowly with a screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. The refrigerator is now defrosting. If you find that the fridge starts now, you will need to replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer.
Step 4 – Volt Test

If the heaters do not come on, use a volt meter to ohm test the defrost heater or volt test for 120 volts to the heater. You can bypass the defrost thermostat if you haven’t got power to the defrost heater to check if the defrost heater will come on. To bypass the thermostat, join the two wires together. Replace the defrost thermostat and the defrost timer if the heater comes on now.

If there is a ticking or squealing noise in the defrost timer, or it seems hot to touch, replace it.

Many fridges have and inline fuse on both sides of the defrost heater. You will need to replace the whole heater if one of those fuses blows. Check these fuses with a volt meter if the defrost heater doesn’t work.

A quick check if you have a cooling problem is to inspect the evaporator coils. If there is a build up of white snow on the coils, this indicates a frost free problem; if there is balled ice on part of the coils with the rest bare, this indicates a system problem, like a problem with the pumping compressor.
Hope this helpout


Jul 28, 2010 | Frigidaire FRT17G4B Top Freezer...

1 Answer

Not only will the fridge side not cool properly, now the door won't stay shut. Temp in fridge side stays 20 degrees warmewr than what panel says.what a pos.


Fridge problem- How to check everything http://www.acmehowto.com/howto/appliance/refrigerator/refrigerator.php
The fridge gets its cold air from the freezer through a vent(damper) between the freezer and fridge.The fan in the freezer blows air through it. There is a flap you adjust with the fridge temp. control. Make sure it's opening and closing when you adjust the fridge temp .
OR
.
If the evaporator coils behind the back panel of the freezer are icing up because of auto defrost failure that will stop the circulation of cold air and eventually affect the freezer too.

check defrost timer, defrost heater, defrost thermostat. In most newer models the timer has been replaced by an electronic control board. If the heater and thermostat are ok it’ll be the control.

You can turn the defrost timer till it clicks and everything shuts down. The heater should now come on. If it does, replace the timer. If it doesn't, check the heater and defrost thermostat. Turn the timer again till everything starts back up to end the defrost cycle.


Your evaporator coils frost up in normal use and every eight hours or so the entire unit shuts down and the defrost heater comes on to melt the frost. This cycle last about 20 minutes. The melted frost drips into a drain pan and through a drain tube to the drain tray under the freezer/refrigerator where it's evaporated by the condenser fan.


Door problem-The lower hinge on each door may have a door closing cam. It raises the door up ¼ inch when opening and this assist in closing the door. If it’s wore out and doesn’t work the door may not seal and the gasket can be damaged. Watch the operation of the door to see if it rises up when opened.

Aug 22, 2009 | Refrigerators

1 Answer

My fridge is not cooling and will get cold forming ice and later will defrost...Is this because the freon is leaking or something alse altogether?


My fridge is running but not cold enough: Start out with the easy stuff first...make sure the lights go out when you close the door(s), make sure the doors are closing properly and the gaskets are closing fully and not torn. Check to make sure the evaporator fan in the freezer is working, this fan blows the cold air around. If the fan is not working, possible bad fan motor - check for power to the fan motor and also check the fan switches around the door openings, ( if your fridge has these switches, not all do ). A common problem cropping up in the last several years has been the air damper not opening up and allowing the cold air from the freezer to be blown into the fresh food section ( mostly on SxS refrigerators ). For many years the air damper was manually operated and now we have motorized controlled or temperature controlled or thermister and electronic boards controlling air dampers, and if this device sticks closed the FF section will normally warm up. An example picture of "one" style and an air damper ( called a diffuser by Whirlpool ). Next would be to check the condenser tubing, a good place to start is to make sure the condenser coils are not built up with dust!! Make sure the condenser fan motor is also working properly. Check for any "clicking on and off" noises from the compressor, is the compressor running.
 
The most common fridge "not cooling" problem is a frost free failure. Remove the access panel in the freezer section to expose the evaporator coils. If the coils in the freezer section get plugged up with frost, this frost will block the evaporator fan motor from blowing the cold air around. The fan blade can also hit this frost and either become noisy or stop altogether. Locating the defrost timer can be tricky....they are often hidden behind the back bottom corners of the fridge at the bottom, in the last few years the timers have been located in the ceiling of the fresh food section, and some behind the cold control cover. Once you locate the defrost timer, slowly turn the screw like wheel in the middle of the defrost timer with a straight screwdriver until the fridge shuts off. You are now in defrost. If the defrost heater(s) comes on now, replace the defrost timer and defrost thermostat. If the heater(s) does not come on, you can ohm test the defrost heater for continuity or volt test for 120 volts to the heater(s). If you have no power to the defrost heater(s) you can also bypass the defrost thermostat to see if the defrost heater will come on, join the 2 wires together to bypass the defrost thermostat. If the heater now comes on, replace the defrost timer and defrost thermostat. If the heater itself is bad, defrost the fridge with a hair dryer, replace the defrost heater* and defrost thermostat. If the defrost timer seems "hot" to the touch or is noisy ( like a ticking or screeching noise )...replace it.
*One new safety device added to refrigerators in the last few years has been a in-line fuse added to both sides of the defrost heater. If one of these fuses let's go, you must replace the whole defrost heater, as it comes as an assembly. If the defrost heater does not work, you should check for one of these fuses being open. Check it with a volt meter or ohm meter.
New link from Appliance Repair Aid on how the wiring circuit works for a frost free fridge, the link is here.
On a frost free refrigerator, the cooling coils should be in the freezer section. On a SxS style refrigerator the coils will be behind a cover on the back wall.  On a freezer on top style the coils could be behind the back wall or under the freezer floor. Removing the cover and exposing the evaporator coils could be a valuable tool. Seeing what the cooling coils looks like may help split your not cooling problem. Totally covered coils with white snow is a frost free problem. A ball of ice on the coils and the rest of the cooling coils are bare or only a few coils frosted a little and the rest are bare is an indication of a system problem. Example picture oneexample picture twoexample picture three. System problems may be a leak in the refrigeration tubing, an inefficient not 100% pumping compressor. 

Feb 26, 2009 | Frigidaire Refrigerators

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