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Power supply on my power supply my atx2 connector the book said no.18 is a +5v on the plug i have -5v how do i make it +

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Re: power supply

You don't need to convert from -5 to +5 just from any +5 pin make bridge to that place you need that is sonlution if your power supply i have more than 350W.

Posted on Aug 04, 2007

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Re: power supply

I agree that if you have a blown power supply that requires repair it doesn't make economic sense to try to fix it. Some repairs on higher end power supplies DO make sense; bad switches, fans and connectors can be fixed easily by most users. In this case I would first verify the motherboard manual is correct before I purchase anything especially if the PC is working with the polarity "reversed" as it is now. You can call the manufacturers tech support to verify the power outputs, search the Internet for a pin-out diagram and verify it that way. An easier and probably better alternative is to purchase an inexpensive $10 to $15 (US) power supply tester. They are easy to find (here anyway) and would easily detect a voltage or polarity issue if one exists.

Posted on Aug 02, 2007

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Re: power supply

Hiya Its pointless changing power supplies and farting around with them They are so cheap in todays world Buy a new one with online support Click this link Power supplies start from £4.00 If you like this site Tell all your friends and give them this link.

Posted on Aug 02, 2007

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Desktop shut down in few seconds after getting display

Good day,
The problem you describe is probably due to a faulty power supply.
The four pin connector which you unplugged supplies power to the CPU, which means you will not be able to get a display with it plugged out, as there will be no power to your CPU.
The fact that the PC does not shut down when removing the 4 pin connector strengthens the evidence that your power supply is faulty. By removing the 4 pin connector you are reducing the power required from the power supply to the point where it is not 'overloaded' enough to switch off.
You can test this by plugging in the 4 pin CPU power connector, then unplugging something else, such as the DVD writer.
Then switch on your PC and see if it still shuts down.
If it remains on then the cause of your problem is definitely the power supply.
Replace the power supply and make sure it has a wattage rating of 400 watts or more. These power supplies are relatively cheap, and should be available at your local PC store for about $15.
Best wishes,

Apr 30, 2013 | PC Desktops


How to replace a computer's power supply

The power supply is one of the most common components to fail inside a desktop computer. If you don't mind turning a screwdriver, you can replace a bad power supply yourself and save on repair costs.

Before purchasing a replacement power supply:

- Make sure to get a power supply that is rated for at least the same wattage as your current power supply.
- Verify that the new power supply has all of the necessary connectors that your current one has. You can either check this visually by looking at the connectors that you have, or by making sure your computer is listed as one of the models that the new power supply is compatible with.
- Make sure the new power supply will fit inside your computer's case. (If the new power supply is compatible with your computer, that won't be a concern.)

To install the new power supply:

- Turn your computer off and unplug it from its power source.
- Unplug all of the cables leading from your computer, including the power cable.
- Open the computer's case. (If you're not sure how to do this, you can probably look it up online. Most computers either have screws in the back that come out, a side panel that slides off, or they open up like a clamshell.)
- Disconnect all of the cables leading from your power supply. Note what component each connector plugs into. You should have connectors for your fan(s), hard drive(s), optical and/or floppy drive(s), motherboard (may be one or two connectors), and the front power switch.
- Unscrew the power supply from the system case and remove it.
- Set the new power supply in the case facing the same way as the old power supply and screw it in.
- Attach all of the connectors. (You may have more connectors than components, but make sure each component that was connected before is connected again now.)
- Close the system case and reattach any screws.
- Plug the power cable into the power supply and then into the wall outlet.
- Reattach all other cables.
- Make sure the power switch on the back of the power supply is on.
- Make sure the voltage switch on the back of the power supply is set to the correct voltage (115 volts in the United States).
- Turn on the computer and verify that it boots up correctly.

on Jan 29, 2011 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Vaio desktop blinking power supply

Remove the side pane to access your motherboard cables, etc. Locate the connector on your motherboard that contains the wires going from your power supply to your motherboard. It will be a large, rectangular connector with a lot of individual wires It is not a ribbon cable but should be located next to a ribbon cable connector and next to a green blinking light on your motherboard (when the power supply is plugged into the wall). Note: This green blinking light is in addition to the green blinking light on the back of the PC.

This next step is important: You have to disconnect the connector noted above from the motherboard WHILE the power suply is plugged into the wall. Wait a few seconds and plug it back in. The blinking reen light on the motherboard should now be a solid green light. The PC should now power up.

If the steps above don't work you will need to get a new power supply.

May 19, 2012 | Sony VAIO VGC-RB42G PC Desktop

1 Answer

The power supply light is flashing and my computer won't start up. No fan, nothing. I disconnected the power to the mother board and the light burned solid when plugged in. I have switched the watts...

Bad Power Supply.
Weak voltage power rail, or rails.
{There are three voltage power rails.
1) The 3.3 Volt power rail
2) The 5 Volt power rail
3) The 12 Volt power rail}

The flashing Green LED light is one direct indication of this for HP computers.
Usually there is at least enough power to light LED lights, and spin fans, but your Power Supply doesn't even have that much power.

1) All of the LED lights on at once use less than 1 Watt of power
2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts of power
3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts of power.
Depends on what Processor it is.

The HP Pavilion A847C desktop computer has an ATX power supply, with a maximum rated wattage of 250 Watts.

The ATX form factor for a Power Supply refers to it's case size, for one.
5-1/2 inches Long, 3-1/2 inches Tall, and 6 inches Wide
The common type of Power Supply used in over 80 percent of PC computers out there, and readily available all over.

HP Support > Pavilion a847c desktop computer > Main support page,

Click on Product information in the list
Now click on Product specifications

Finally click on > Motherboard Specifications, PTGD1-LA (Goldfish )

Scroll the page down to view the motherboard illustration and photo.

The replacement Power Supply has to have,

A) A 24-pin ATX main power cable.
In the motherboard photo, view the Ram Memory slots. The long Blue, and Black slots.

To the right of the bottom corner of the Black ram slot (Slot 4) is a whitish connector.
Two columns of 12 socket holes.
This is where the 24-pin ATX main power cable plugs into.
(ATX Power Connector in the motherboard illustration)

Typical 24-pin ATX main power cable,

NOTE the Lock Clip on the side of the connector.

B) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
At the bottom Left corner of the Processor socket is a whitish square connector.
4 socket holes.
This is where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs into.
(ATX12V in the motherboard illustration)

Typical 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

NOTE the Lock Clip on the side of the connector.

{The top of the Lock Clip is squeezed in to release it, and is held while the power cable is removed.
Same for the 24-pin ATX main power cable's connector}

C) SATA power cable.
Used for the SATA harddrive

The SATA power cable has 15 pins, and is the longer connector.
The SATA data cable has 7 pins, and is the shorter connector.

IF, the SATA harddrive has provisions for plugging in a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, ONLY USE the SATA power cable.
Otherwise you will burn up the SATA harddrive.

The SATA power cable plugs into the SATA harddrive.
One end of the SATA data cable plugs into the motherboard, and the other end plugs into the SATA harddrive.

Below the ram slots in the bottom Right corner are the SATA headers on the motherboard, that the SATA harddrive plugs into.
The Blue, Orange, Black and White connectors.

Of course the SATA harddrive only plugs into one of them.
Looking at the motherboard illustration you will see they are numbered.
SATA 1, SATA 2, SATA 3, and SATA 4.

IT DOESN'T MATTER which one you plug your harddrive into. (Or any SATA device)
That's the beauty of SATA.
BIOS will find the harddrive.
But for you, it will be easier to keep track of where the SATA harddrive is plugged in, if you just use SATA 1.

Typical SATA power cable,

D) 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable.
Commonly referred to as Molex. (Misnomer)

Used for optical drives, Fans, and other associated hardware.

Typical 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

E) 4-pin Small Peripheral power cable.
Used to be commonly used for a Floppy Drive.
For your computer it provides power to the Memory Card Reader.

Typical 4-pin Small Peripheral power cable,

Watch disconnecting, and connecting this connector. You can bend the pins very easily.
WATCH your fingers as the pins are QUITE SHARP!

All of the power cables listed above are standard for today's Power Supply's.

About the Wattage.
A computer ONLY uses the power it needs, and NO more.

If you put a 10,000 Watt power supply in, and the computer only needed 100 watts for what it is doing, it will ONLY use 100 watts.
To wit, if you install a Power Supply with more Wattage than 250 Watts, it will NOT hurt your computer.

If you need guidance in replacing your Power Supply, or recommendations for a Power Supply, please state in a Comment.


(Apologize for being so lengthy)

Nov 24, 2010 | HP PAVILION A847C Intel Pentium 540 HT...

1 Answer

I am looking for a wiring diagram for my emachine front power switch

Power Supply Types

There are two basic types of power supplies. There are AT power supplies, which are older and in older computers, and ATX power supplies, which you will find in virtually every new computer you can buy.

There are two fundamental differences between AT and ATX power supplies. First, the switch mechanism is different. AT power supplies use a normal on-off switch, which directly turns the power supply on or off.

ATX power supplies use a momentary switch which does not directly control the power. Instead, the switch signals the motherboard, which performs one of three actions:

  • If the computer is off, the power supply is turned on (which turns the computer on)
  • If the computer is on, the computer goes into power-saving mode (standby)
  • If the switch is held for more than 4 seconds, the power is cut and the computer turns off.
Because of this difference, ATX power supplies are better for projects that require the second power supply to turn on automatically when the computer is turned on.

The second difference is in the motherboard connector: AT power supplies provide two 6-pin connectors (figure 1), which are easy to insert backwards. The ATX connector is a single 20-pin connector that only plugs in one way (figure 2).
2psfig1small.jpg 2psfig2small.jpg
Figures 1 and 2: The difference between AT (left) and ATX (right) motherboard connectors.
Both power supplies provide two types connectors for plugging devices into. These connectors are called Molex connectors, and they come in two sizes (see figure 3 and 4). A power supply will generally have a few of each size.
2psfig3small.jpg 2psfig4small.jpg
Figures 3 and 4: Large (left) and small (right) Molex connectors.
There is no difference between the two sizes other than the size itself. Both sizes provide the same amount of power to whatever device is plugged into it (12V and 5V). The small Molex connectors are generally used only for floppy drives. Large Molex connectors power hard drives, CD/DVD drives, and many fans and lights as well.

Note: You can purchase large and small Y-adapters if you run out of Molex connectors. Be careful when using the Y-adapters however, because if your power supply does not have enough power for all the devices attached (especially true for older, lower-wattage supplies), you can damage it.

Dec 03, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

I have a Gateway 830GM, I was wondering if it were possible to change the motherboard so I could put a newer CPU in it? I would like to buy a core 2 duo motherboard + CPU but I am not sure if I can do that...

Desktop computer cases have standard mounting holes and screw stand offs.
There are a huge range of motherboards available, select well known brands, my favorite are Gigabyte, Intel and MSI.
Select a motherboard with the features you require. If you are into gaming, graphics/CAD then select a motherboard that does not have a built-in graphics chip, and then you can get a high end graphics card.

Most likely you need a CPU and RAM with your new motherboard.
You may also need a newer ATX2 power supply if not then check the total power requirements of the new system, it needs to be at least 10 to 15% over the total power requirements so you don't stress the switch mode power supply.

Nov 19, 2009 | Gateway 830GM PC Desktop

1 Answer


first unscrew the cover of the computer, then
i suggest you take out all the connectors, so that you can dettach the power supply easily.remove the screws at the back of the power supply, which is in the back panel of the cpu chassis.
unplug the 24 or 20 pin connector from the cpu and all the power cords that supply the peripherals, take out the power supply and replace with a new one.
Plug the screws, plug the 20 or 24 pin power connector into your motherboard, and supply devices like your hard disk, cd rom by plugging in the power cords.
note, if your computer has a 4pin connector, make sure that you plug it in.

Heres a video tutorial on the step by step process.

hope this will help you out.
Thank you: )

Aug 09, 2009 | E-Machines T2885 PC Desktop

2 Answers

Needing to plug new power source to motherboard, need the diagram format

the easyest way to do it is to open up the side panel of the computer rite down the info off the side of the power supply such as voltage and so on then go out and buy the same type then as you pull out a plug from the one in your computer put in the same plug from the one you bought and you should be rite, theres nothing that technical you need to no just disconnect it from the power and pull out the plugs its that easy

May 29, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer


The main connector to the power supply has to go into the motherboard. Its a rectangle shapped male connector that is on the end of the power supply that plugs into a rectangle female shaped connector on the motherboard. There might also be a shorter square male 4 pin connector at the end of the power supply that should connect into a 4 pin female connector on the motherboard.

After this then you'll want to plug the other connectors into any cd-rom, dvd-rom drives you may have. Same for a floppy drive if you have one. Also make sure your hard drive is hooked up. The connectors that you plug to these devices can only go in one way so no worries about hooking it up improperly. Hope this helps.

After all this, turn on the computer and then after you boot up into windows, make sure you go into my computer and verify that all your drives are being shown in there.

Jan 28, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

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