Question about ViewSonic EA771 Monitor

1 Answer

No power though the feeding line up to the monitor has 220 volts

Hace the impression that a fuse has blown inside or something similar

Posted by on

  • fabacigalupo Mar 02, 2009

    The monitor does not switch at all

  • fabacigalupo Mar 03, 2009

    There is no external fuse related to the actual power plug. However I noticed that the equipment originally was sold with a two ´prong plug without any central earth connection.

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  • 78 Answers

Hi does the monitor switch on at all or does it do a ticking sound ? because if so then its probably the wic.

Posted on Mar 02, 2009

  • Mr fix.it Mar 02, 2009

    There is a fuse internally in the monitor but did you check the fuse that should be in the actual power plug ?

  • Mr fix.it Mar 04, 2009

    If you are conversant with electronics you can open the monitor and check the fuse which is usually on the board however as a warning a monitor can be deadly since it can supply up to Kilo Volts so if you are not conversant with this stuff please for your own safety do not open anything.

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1 Answer

Power outage. Turned fuse box back on 24 hours still no hot water


We have situations like that where even with an electrical meter it may appear that both sides of the panel have voltage when actually one of the main breakers or fuse has blown. If that is the case power flows through some 220 volt devices to feed the second side of the panel but no 220 volt appliances work. If that is the case then the voltage will not be 120 volts on the second side but some lighting has a brown out or too low of a voltage. If none of this is happening then you have blown your element. To prove that... verify with a multimeter that you have 220 volts on the element.

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Whirlpool Senseon dryer GEW9868KQO will not heat - there is 110vac at P1-5 (L1) and P1-2 (N), The Thermal Cut-Off is closed, the high Limit Thermostat is closed, I am getting 10K ohms at P2-5 and P-6 the...


1) bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals, the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter it's temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.

2) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater,( which needs 220), will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.

3) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out. There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.

Hope this helped Tim

May 27, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

Kenmore dryer heating problem


Hi

These are the common causes for the dryer not to heat up:-

1) A burned out heating element. Remove tall box on right, element slides out from the bottom together with the "carrier". Look for broken coil, or check 2 terminals at bottom with ohm meter.

2) Burned wires at connectors. Check for obviously overheated wire terminals at all sensors (thermostats and thermal fuses in back), heater box, main terminals where power cord hooks up, etc.

3) An open thermal fuse. This is a small "thermostat" with 2 wires at the middle/top of the heater "box" (a tall narrow box on right in the back of the machine), or a plastic type on the duct close to the blower, depending on the model. You will need to remove the back cover of the machine to see these. Check with an ohm meter after disconnecting one of the leads, or jumper the 2 wires together to see if heater works (don't use this way though, fire hazard... replace the device) If this proves to be the cause of the problem, it would be wise to check all ducts and blower for excessive lint build-up. This will reduce air flow, causing overheating and blown thermal fuses.

4) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater, which 220 needs will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.

5) Bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals; the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter its temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.

6) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out.
There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.


Also check the bellow link related to your issue:-


http://www.partselect.com/dryer+dryer-wont-heat+repair.htm

Please get back to us if you have any further query.

Have a nice day.

Dec 02, 2010 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

1 Answer

WIRLPOOL DRYER ONLY BLOWS COLD


Hi,


Thank you for contacting Fixya.com.


Please check the following causes for your problem:-


1) A burned out heating element. Remove tall box on right, element slides out from the bottom together with the "carrier". Look for broken coil, or check 2 terminals at bottom with ohm meter.

2) Burned wires at connectors. Check for obviously overheated wire terminals at all sensors (thermostats and thermal fuses in back), heater box, main terminals where power cord hooks up, etc.

3) An open thermal fuse. This is a small "thermostat" with 2 wires at the middle/top of the heater "box" (a tall narrow box on right in the back of the machine), or a plastic type on the duct close to the blower, depending on the model. You will need to remove the back cover of the machine to see these. Check with an ohm meter after disconnecting one of the leads, or jumper the 2 wires together to see if heater works (don't use this way though, fire hazard... replace the device) If this proves to be the cause of the problem, it would be wise to check all ducts and blower for excessive lint build-up. This will reduce air flow, causing overheating and blown thermal fuses.

4) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater, which 220 needs will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.

5) Bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals; the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter its temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.

6) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out.
There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.


Also check the bellow link related to your issue:-


http://www.partselect.com/dryer+dryer-wont-heat+repair.htm


Please get back to us if you have any further query.


Have a nice day.


Dec 01, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer is running fine but no heat at all


Hi,


Thank you for contacting Fixya.com.


1) A burned out heating element. Remove tall box on right, element slides out from the bottom together with the "carrier". Look for broken coil, or check 2 terminals at bottom with ohm meter.

2) Burned wires at connectors. Check for obviously overheated wire terminals at all sensors (thermostats and thermal fuses in back), heater box, main terminals where power cord hooks up, etc.

3) An open thermal fuse. This is a small "thermostat" with 2 wires at the middle/top of the heater "box" (a tall narrow box on right in the back of the machine), or a plastic type on the duct close to the blower, depending on the model. You will need to remove the back cover of the machine to see these. Check with an ohm meter after disconnecting one of the leads, or jumper the 2 wires together to see if heater works (don't use this way though, fire hazard... replace the device) If this proves to be the cause of the problem, it would be wise to check all ducts and blower for excessive lint build-up. This will reduce air flow, causing overheating and blown thermal fuses.

4) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater, which 220 needs will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.

5) Bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals; the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter its temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.

6) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out.
There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.


Also check the bellow link related to your issue:-

http://www.partselect.com/dryer+dryer-wont-heat+repair.htm


Please get back to us if you have any further query.


Dec 01, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

My dryer wont heat up


Hello,
First, I assume that the drum spins OK but there is no heat. Many things can cause this. From the most likely cause to the least likely:
1) An open thermal fuse. This is a small "thermostat" with 2 wires at the middle/top of the heater "box" (a tall narrow box on right in the back of the machine), or a plastic type on the duct close to the blower, depending on the model. You will need to remove the back cover of the machine to see these. Check with an ohm meter after disconnecting one of the leads, or jumper the 2 wires together to see if heater works (don't use this way though, fire hazard... replace the device) If this proves to be the cause of the problem, it would be wise to check all ducts and blower for excessive lint buildup. This will reduce air flow, causing overheating and blown thermal fuses.
2) A burned out heating element. Remove tall box on right, element slides out from the bottom together with the "carrier". Look for broken coil, or check 2 terminals at bottom with ohm meter.
3) Burned wires at connectors. Check for obviously overheated wire terminals at all sensors (thermostats and thermal fuses in back), heater box, main terminals where power cord hooks up, etc.
4) Bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals, the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter it's temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.
5) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater, which needs 220 will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.
6) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out.
There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.
Hope this help in solving the problem...

Sep 30, 2010 | LG DLE2532W Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Electric dryer wont heat


Hi, I assume that the drum spins OK but there is no heat. Most likely causes are:-
1) An open thermal fuse. This is a small "thermostat" with 2 wires at the middle/top of the heater "box" (a tall narrow box on right in the back of the machine), or a plastic type on the duct close to the blower, depending on the model. You will need to remove the back cover of the machine to see these. Check with an ohm meter after disconnecting one of the leads, or jumper the 2 wires together to see if heater works (don't use this way though, fire hazard... replace the device) If this proves to be the cause of the problem, it would be wise to check all ducts and blower for excessive lint buildup. This will reduce air flow, causing overheating and blown thermal fuses.

2) A burned out heating element. Remove tall box on right, element slides out from the bottom together with the "carrier". Look for broken coil, or check 2 terminals at bottom with ohm meter.

3) Burned wires at connectors. Check for obviously overheated wire terminals at all sensors (thermostats and thermal fuses in back), heater box, main terminals where power cord hooks up, etc.

4) Bad thermostats. There are usually 2 or more. A high limit on heater box, just above terminals on the bottom. 1 or 2 will be on the duct next to the blower. Check these with an ohm meter (or continuity checker). Some have 4 terminals, the extra 2 small terminals are small heaters inside the thermostats which alter it's temperature characteristics. These will usually read around 4000 ohms or so. Check the 2 main largest terminals for continuity.

5) Only getting 110 volts: This is often overlooked, but if for some reason one of the poles feeding the 220 power from the house wiring is open but the other is OK (for example, houses with fuses where only one fuse is blown, or a bad circuit breaker with one pole open). The motor and timer run on 110. If the side of the 220 line that feeds the motor is OK but the other one is open the motor will run but the heater, which needs 220 will not heat. Check for 220 volts between the 2 outer terminals where power cord connects or between the 2 "hot" terminals of the 220 outlet the dryer is plugged into.

6) Bad centrifugal switch in motor. This is what actually turns the heater on, for safety reasons, so the heater cannot come on unless the fan is spinning. Otherwise without air flow past it, the heater would burn out.
There are 2 large gauge (usually red or yellow) wires going to the connector on the motor, these go to the contacts inside the motor that turn the heater on.

Thanks! mannu_rakesh

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1 Answer

What will happen if it is plugged into a 220 volt AC


Hi there, it depends where you got your Wii from.

if your Wii was from japan or another country which uses only a 110v AC power supply then you could have either blown some fuses inside the wii or at worse you could have fried some of the internals.

First of all find out which adapter you where supplied with, check the voltage rating on the adaptor. if it is a 110v adaptor then you may need to have your Wii replaced.

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2 Answers

110 Volts plugged in 220


More than likely just the power supply would be damaged, it should blow before the rest of the unit gets damaged. Maybe even just the fuse inside where the power lead connects is blown.

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1 Answer

To Arpi > PS2 U.S.A. version (110 volts) SCPH-39001 charged to 220 volts - is it burnt already?


This would have damaged the power supply, most likely not harming any other parts. Fuses do not smell when they blow so something else was damaged. I would suggest looking for a similar revision that has a blown laser or other trouble and use the power supply from that.

Jun 02, 2007 | Sony PlayStation 2 (PS2) Console

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