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Stitching won't stay in place

Beginner sewer. sewing straight stitch only and stitching won't stay in place. gobs up on the back and can be easily pulled out. What am i doing wrong?

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  • 26 Answers

Upper thread tension may be too loose
needle may have a slight bend in it
may need cleaning use canned air to blow out lintmaybe take in to a repair shop and have them check it out and show you about the cleaning process.

Posted on Mar 08, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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2 Answers

Fabric won't move doing straight stitch.


Be sure that the stitch length is set to a higher number. The closer to zero it is set, the closer the stitches will be until zero when it will actually be sewing in one place.

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Nov 10, 2015 | Juki America, Inc Juki HZL-27Z 22-Stitch...

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What settings should I be using to use to make a straight stitch


try Google Make ,model,manual .
too many makes to guess what you have

May 24, 2015 | Sewing Machines

2 Answers

Why does my thread knot on the back when stitching in place?


Several things to try:
Pull thread tails (both bobbin thread and upper thread) straight back and when you lower the presser foot, make sure they are held down straight back. This may or may not be enough to solve the problem, but it is simple to try, and often works. You might want to hold the thread tails while you start sewing.
Use a starter--folded piece of fabric scrap about an inch long--and begin sewing oink middle of starter. Push the fabric you want to see right up to the starter and keep sewing from the starter right onto your project without lifting the presser foot or cutting the thread. When you finish sewing, cut the little piece of thread between the starter and your project.
Before lowering presser foot, use wheel to lower your needle once and then pull up bobbin thread to top surface of your project. Then hold both bobbin and upper thread tails, lower your presser foot, and begin sewing. Release the thread tails after a few stitches.
Hope this helps. Those nasty "thread nests" are a real pain.

Jul 13, 2014 | Janome Sewing Machines

4 Answers

Can I go from straight stitches to zigzag stiches and back in the same seam?


Hi Susie,

I can't tell whether you mean straight stitching and then turning your work 180 degrees to stitch atop the straight stitches in zig-zag, or continuing around the corner of your straight stitched side using zig-zag. But you can do either. You can mix up straight and zig-zag stitching at will.

Just ease up to a stop, ensuring the needle is positioned down inside the work when you stop.
Lift the foot.
Adjust to your desired stitch setting.
Lower the foot.
Turn the wheel toward you manually to ensure the stitches will be placed where you want them, and
Slowly engage the power again (via foot or thigh lever).

Hope this helps.

May 14, 2014 | Singer 3116 Simple

1 Answer

Stitch width knob


What's the model? Do you have the stitch selector set on straight stitch, or on a stitch with a width component, like a blind hem stitch?
Some machines consider straight stitch to be a zigzag stitch of width=0, while others have separate settings for a straight stitch and a zigzag (or other) stitch.

Feb 11, 2014 | Elna Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Hand held sewing machine


I think you are saying no stitch is formed also referred to as the needle not catching thread. Below offers a variety of diagnoses and solutions which are straight forward.

Sewing Machine Needle Not Catching Thread

Below is general advice quoted from 6 common sewing machine problems solved:

Skipped stitches are usually due to a bad needle. The needle may have become damaged or bent by sewing material too thick for the needle, forcing material through the feed dog, or hitting a straight pin. If the problem seems to be consistently reoccurring, it may be due to forcing the fabric. Sewers should allow the feed dog to pull the fabric and only use their hands to guide the fabric through the feed. When sewing knitted fabrics, using a stretch needle can help prevent skipped stitches.

Below is a video showing how thread is hooked into a fabric:

Sewing Machine Anatomy How Stitch is Made

Jan 18, 2018 | Sewing Machines

3 Answers

Won't sew stitch patterns, thread gobs up on underside fabric


it is called bird nesting and indicates that the needle thread is not tight enough

Dec 14, 2017 | Singer Sewing Machines

1 Answer

White XL1760 cant find the setting for the straight stitch.....a, b, c????


You can download a manual for your White machine from the Singer website, link is
http://www.singerco.com/uploads/download/1111_white-1760-xl-x.pdf

Here are the relevant pages from the manual:

tally_girl_51.jpg
tally_girl_52.jpg
Straight stitch settings as follows:
stitch length on 2.5 (selector marked with blue arrow)
stitch width on zero (no swinging of the needle) selector marked with red arrow
stitch selector on A - selector marked with green arrow

Generally all sewing machines will have a similar three controls, because all stitches are a combination of moving the fabric forward a certain amount between the needle going through the fabric - the stitch length; and moving the needle from side to side - the stitch width.

And then a stitch selector for different stitch forms such as a blind hem or shell stitch where the needle is going through a series of different moves in sequence to form a special stitch. You still have the width and length controls to vary this formation.

For general sewing machine information www.sewing.about.com is excellent, there is lots of pages on general tips, cleaning, threading up and sewing machine know how. Try this page to start http://sewing.about.com/od/sewingmachineindex/ig/Sewing-Machines.--9k/

If you are a beginner, then I'd recommend printing out the instruction manual for your machine and putting into a binder, placing beside the machine, and carefully read from the beginning going through all the instructions to wind a bobbin, thread up, three or four times until you can do it without reading the manual, then practice stitching out each of the stitches your machine does. Buy a cheap exercise book and on each page, write the name of the stitch, staple the stitch sample in and either write down the settings used or glue in a photo taken of the machine controls you used. This way you can quickly flick through and refer to your settings next time. ADjusting the top tension dial will also adjust the stitch formation so read the manual and set the tension dial to the setting it suggests but sometimes you'll need to adjust it slightly to get the stitch looking even (balanced between top and bottom thread), especially for zigzags.

Practice a bit and you'll soon feel much more confident using the machine. Also, refer to the cleaning and oiling instructions and do it regularly, along with changing the needle for each new sewing project, about 4-6 hours sewing time. The needle is the most important part of a sewing machine, always use the right sized needle for the fabric. Refer here for info http://sewing.about.com/od/sewingmachineindex/ig/Sewing-Machine-Needles/

I hope this helps you with your White sewing machine, there are lots of great sewing machine books on the market too or in your public library to refer to. Also taking beginner sewing classes will really help you learn how best to use your machine. I've been sewing for over 38 years but still enjoy going to a class and learning a new technique from another enthusiast - life long learner!!


Jul 18, 2011 | Sewing Machines

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