Question about Delta JT160 Shopmaster 10 Amp 6 Inch Benchtop Jointer

1 Answer

Infeed Table leveling

The front (leading) edge of my in-feed table is approx 1/32" lower than the back (next to cutter) edge.  Is there a way to adjust this to absolutely parallel with out-feed table?

Posted by on

  • 2 more comments 
  • 1bigguy Mar 01, 2009

    The infeed table is flat -- it's fine -- it's just lower on the leading edge which causes the workpiece to rock front to back as it passes across the cutter.

  • 1bigguy Mar 02, 2009

    I understand that the in-feed table is suppose to be lower than the out-feed table.  That is not the problem.  As I said -- the leading edge of the in-feed table is lower than the trailing edge of the in-feed table -- the in-feed table slopes upward toward the cutters.  That is what I don't know how to fix.

  • Anonymous Mar 31, 2009

    i have the same problem as you and don't know what to do i think i might be applying to much presser.

  • Dean
    Dean May 11, 2010

    So you want the infeed table to be parallel to the outfeed table, or your infeed table alone is not flat front to back?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Expert
  • 285 Answers

Well, the infeed table is supposed to be lower than the outfeed table. This is how the jointer actually removes material to flatten a face or board edge. What is important is that the the outfeed table is level with the top of the cutterhead blades, so as you push material through the cutterhead, the outfeed table fully supports the workpiece.

The infeed table is supposed to be adjustable up and down to remove different amounts of material.

If both infeed and outfeed tables were aligned, no material would be cut (assuming the outfeed was aligned with top of the blades).

Posted on Mar 01, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to attah table leg frame to table bottom panel?


Not quite sure what part(s) you're having problems with. But I'll tell you what I know...

There is a table top (a bunch of boards joined edge-to edge). Under this top is a skirt. The skirt is typically a box that doesn't need the table top for structural support - the legs are attached to the skirt (in the corners). Depending on how the skirt is designed, the legs may be removable (makes the skirt more complex).

Attaching the skirt to the table top can be done in many ways. The best way is to allow for expansion/contraction of the table top. The edge to edge combination of the table top makes for a larger expansion/contraction than the skirt. So the skirt should have a slot instead of a hole for a screw through to the table top.

If you just screw everything together, it will work. But if moisture and/or temperature changes, you may separate the table top, or joints in the skirt.

Apr 23, 2015 | Table Saws

1 Answer

Adjustment on dewalt planer


I don't know which planer you have, but if all the planing happens on the top side of your stock then all surfaces underneath should be at the same level.
If you have a fancy planer that cuts on the bottom side, then the outfeed table should align with the cutters and the infeed table would be adjusted below that by the cut thickness (like a jointer

Mar 17, 2014 | Dewalt DW7351 Folding Table for DW735

1 Answer

Severe sniping with planer


You will always have snipe at the end of planed boards equal to the distance from your infeed and outfeed rollers. It's severity is determined by how much the board sags or dropps behind the planer until the second roller catches the board. Some planers have extended tables to help with this. What you can do is hold the board up as much as possible and still let the infeed roller move the board smoothly until the board contacts the outfeed roller.

Jan 30, 2013 | Craftsman 12 amp 12-1/2" Bench Planer...

1 Answer

I believe my table saw blade is not accurately aligned with the table and I can't find my Owner's Manual.


OK, first you should understand that the blade needs to be aligned with the miter slot. The easiest way to check this is to use a ruler.

UNPLUG YOUR SAW BEFORE BEGINNING!

First, use a pencil or a marker to mark the outside of one of the teeth on your blade, on the same side of the blade as the miter slot you're going to measure from. Position the marked tooth at the front of the table, then measure from the side of the marked tooth to the leading edge of the miter slot. To determine if it is aligned correctly, you simply spin the blade around where the marked tooth is at the back of the table and measure it again to the leading edge of the miter slot. The measurements should match. If you want to be more accurate you can use a machinists dial gauge to measure within 1/1000 of an inch.

If the measurements are off, you need to loosen the trunion bolts that mount to arbor to the table just slightly, then use a dead blow to move the table in the appropriate direction.

Search youtube for "table saw allignment" to find lots of videos showing this technique.

Also, here is a copy of your owners manual:

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfimages/c2/c2e26e29-35a4-469c-8193-136092afdbd3.pdf

Jun 30, 2012 | Ridgid 10 in. 13-Amp Professional Table...

1 Answer

How do you square a miter gauage on a 10" sears


I just turn it upside down and put it in the slot so that the gage rests against the edge of the table. Then tighten the locking knob. This should give you an instant accurate setting as long as the slot in the table is very close to dead-on square with the slot - which it should be. But to verify that it is, just turn the square back right side up and hold a flashlight under it as you hold it very close to the table edge. If the table edge is out of square with the table slot, you will easily see this because the error will be doubled by turning the gage over. By the way, if the rails for your rip fence are in the way, the rails may be parallel enough to the edge of the table to be of no concern. Or you can put a piece of wood with parallel sides on top of the rail between the edge of the table and the upside-down gage. Another easy confirmation is to use a square to draw a line (with a sharp pencil) on a piece of plywood that has a good edge. Flip that square over to confirm that your square is square. Then you can put your miter gage upside down on the plywood to check it against the line. Good luck. Al K

Mar 02, 2011 | Craftsman 10" Table Saw

1 Answer

How do you make the outfeed and infeed tables paralell? The infeed table closest to the blade is a little lower than the other end? Any suggestions?


Instruction manual is here.

Exploded diagram is here.

I'm pretty sure you're saying your planer tables are not coplanar.

http://thewoodwhisperer.com/jointer-setup/ is worth watching. Despite his comments about a level, a decent level works fine for making sure your tables are flat and coplanar on smaller units like this.

On more expensive planers there are gibs that can be adjusted to fix this issue. Your part list doesn't list any gibs, so it looks like you will have to loosen the screws holding the infeed or outfeed table in place and shim it. You can use a metal feeler gauge to figure out how much need to shim it.

Also, if you're still in warranty, Delta may be able to replace your unit. If you're going down this route, I'd recommend you take a level and your unit into a service center so you can show them the problem.

Be aware that the replacement "could" be worse than the original. Be sure to check it. I recently waited 6 weeks for a replacement fence for my jointer (mine developed a twist) and the new one had a 3/8" bow in that was ridiculous.

Unfortunately the Shopmaster line wasn't Delta's greatest and there have been a lot of problems with them. It might be worth keeping an eye on craigslist in your area, as decent prices can be had on jointers fairly regularly.

Please vote if this answer was useful.

Jun 10, 2010 | Delta JT160 Shopmaster 10 Amp 6 Inch...

1 Answer

I have a 1979 unisaw and it is burning stock . the arbor is 0.001" off ,I checked with a digital dial indicator. I have not used my fence just cross-cutting with my delta miter gauge. I bought a new freud...


I would use a straight edge, to see if the blade is parallel to the table. Bring the blade up, put the straightedge on it and measure to one of the dado cuts in the table, front and back should be the same. If not, You can loosen up the mounting bolts underneath and tap the whole thing around to square it up. Hope this helps.

Jan 08, 2010 | Delta X5 3Hp Left Titl Unisaw with...

1 Answer

I HAVE JUST BOUGHT AN OLD DEWALT DW1201 RADIAL ARM SAW WHICH DID NOT HAVE A CUTTING TABLE ONLY THE METAL FRAME. COULD YOU PLEASE TELL ME WHERE I CAN AQUIRE AN OWNERS MANUAL AS I AM HAVING QUITE A BIT OF...


Normally DeWalt owners manuals are available from DeWalt ServiceNet (Click here),
But I have been unable to get any hits on that model number when I search the site. and I'm thinking you have probably purchased one of the older cast iron models, a 12 or 14", am I right?
Sometimes I've had luck finding manual for older machines at this link, but in your case I wasn't able to turn anything useful up there either...
In general, those saws had a two piece table, with a strip of 3/4" ply or particle board about 3-4" or so wide in back, and a wider piece in front, both about 3-4' wide. Between the two, on edge, sat a fence, approx.2 1/2" tall. The back table was sized so that the fence would be located in the correct reference to the blade, i.e. in front of the blade when the saw was pushed all the way back against its stop.. Then the thumbscrew clamps on either side of the table would squeeze the fence between the back section and the front section of the table.. The leveling screws beneath are used to level the table with respect to the path of the saw along the arm, so that, e.g., a tooth of the blade just skims along barely touching along its entire path of cut...
You can probably learn the correct sequence of adjustments for squaring the blade vertically and horizontally and adjusting for heel by examining other radial arm saw manuals, or perhaps consulting books on the subject...
Here's a link to an online forum on the subject
I haven't actually seen this book, but it looks interesting...Mr Sawdust
And finally, if you check back issues of Fine Woodworking online or at your local library, there are bound to be some articles on radial arms saws to help you along...
Sorry I couldn't hook you up with a manual, but I hope this helps... Good luck!


I hope this information allows you to resolve this issue. If you need further assistance, please post back with a comment to this thread.
If I've managed to answer your question or solve a problem, please take a moment to kindly rate this post....thanks!



Apr 10, 2009 | Table Saws

1 Answer

Adjusting the outfeed table on the Delta Model: JT-160


Sometimes you just have to shim them. If you've worked the gibs and can't get any more adjustment out of them, you might try buying some thin brass or copper metal stock (you can get it in rolls at Hobby Lobby) and use it as a shim to hold the table in the appropriate position.
It sounds crude, but that was the only way I managed to get my industrial 6" powermatic to true up.
Also bring the infeed table up to zero, aligned exactly with the outfeed table and check with a known true straightedge. This will help you to keep a clear idea in mind of which direction to move things when you're making adjustments.
If you can get the edges and diagonals straight, you're well on your way to straight cuts.
Make sure beforehand that the surface you're fixing to is flat and you're not clamping the machine down in a way that's torqueing the base.
Castings just aren't rested long enough these days before the surfaces are ground, and things twist a bit sometimes. You may be working with a surface not flat, and unable to get it perfect.
Good luck. I hope that helps a little.
You may need to use an auxiliary roller stand to support the outfeed of long boards to keep the weight from causing a droop that lifts the tail off the tables and prevents a straight cut.

Mar 12, 2009 | Delta JT160 Shopmaster 10 Amp 6 Inch...

1 Answer

Fence will not lock in place


You adjust the handle tension by actually adjusting the t-square itself, changing the relative position it sits from the rect tube mounted to the saw.
This is done by turning the two allen set screws mounted in the angle iron that is welded to the fence. There are a couple of tabs that ride along the inside face of the rect tube when the fence slides from side to side. You'll see that each of these tabs is adjustable, in or out, by slightly turning the allen set screws with an allen wrench. BOTH of these must be adjusted, so that you maintain the fence's 'squareness' to the table.
What I do is line up the edge of the fence with the mitre slot in the saw table, feeling the edge of the fence as it hangs over the edge of the mitre slot, both at the infeed and outfeed end of the slot. It should be perfectly flush at both ends.
By turning the set screws in or out a little, you can adjust the handle tension to the place where you like it (you don't need to force it into position to have it hold firmly; that's too tight). Then check the squareness of the fence by clamping it down along the edge of the mitre jig slot, and see if it's parrallel. If not, you need to adjust one or both screws to make it parrallel, and get the tension right. You may have to go back and forth a few times, but eventually you can dial it in to where it feels just right and the alignment is correct. Think small adjustments.
At the same time, put a little dab of wheel bearing grease or vaseline on the cam of the fence handle where it rubs against that little flap. This will make it easier to engage when the tension is firm and keep it from wearing abrasively.
This fence is a joy to use when it's dialed in. I hope you find this information helpful. Happy woodworking!

Dec 01, 2008 | Delta BC50 Left Handed Biesemeyer...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Delta JT160 Shopmaster 10 Amp 6 Inch Benchtop Jointer Logo

Related Topics:

454 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Delta Table Saws Experts

EugenesDIYDen
EugenesDIYDen

Level 3 Expert

479 Answers

John Trevino

Level 3 Expert

1378 Answers

Bobby Poirier
Bobby Poirier

Level 2 Expert

166 Answers

Are you a Delta Table Saw Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...