Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Close up shots won't auto focus.the lens trys to adjust but the final setting is out of focus. the camera works fine on subjects at least 2 feet away

Posted by on

  • bookjamm Apr 16, 2009

    I think I have the same problem. I was taking photos of my jewelry on the macro setting and it was working great. Then the photos started looking blurry even though the lighting and settings were the same as before. I thought maybe I had changed a setting, so I went through the entire manual and did not really find anything that would be causing this. When I take the photo (camera on small tripod) the LCD screen shows the picture taking but out of focus and it takes a second or sometimes much longer for the LCD screen to finish and be ready for the next picture. When I noticed the camera doing this is when the photos started showing up blurry. The longer the camera hesitates, the more blurry the photo will be. Is there something wrong with my camera?

×

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 2 Answers

Try using the little throttle that is located just below your on/off switch. if you push that either up/down, it should help you manually focus your subject. It is actually a really fun feature to play around with.

Posted on Mar 14, 2009

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

I have the FZ8, lovely camera. I use mine a lot to take very close up shots (12x - 48x zoom) of work related Items.

To overcome the problem you might find (surprisingly) you are too close to the subject. Move the camera and tripod further away and try and focus again, if it does the same thing, move further away.
As an example if I am trying to focus using this camera on Macro and at 12x optical + 4 x digital zoom I am sometimes 4 - 6 feet away from the subject. Worked for me.

Regards

Jeff

Posted on May 11, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

The auto focus does not work properly with this lens on either my Nikon D5000 or D7000. I have tried all possible combinations of AF settings. Typicaly, when I use single point to focus, the subject I...


Hi, It wouldn't autofocus on the D5000 as the body doesn't have an auto focus motor in the body and since that lens is AF, not AF-S, it won't autofocus. It should autofocus on the D7000 though, how far away are you from the object you're trying to photograph?

Aug 28, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II LD...

1 Answer

I have a canon 40D and it will not shoot in auto focus .. was working fine today and just stopped. will not do anything set on AF but in manuel it will ,,, Help !


A couple of possible reasons:
You are trying to take the shot with the lens too close to the subject. If you attempt to take a shot with AF on while too close then the camera won't take the photo. Try backing up from the subject a bit.
Which camera mode are you in? If you are using the green box (automatic) mode then in very low-light settings the camera may refuse to take the photo.
The AF on your lens might be broken. Try using a different lens (if you have one available). Do other lenses have the same problem?

Mar 13, 2011 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Shots are blurry


This issue can occur in the following circumstances:
The subject is too close to the camera lens Insufficient lighting Subject movement Camera movement Incorrect camera settings Incorrect camera operation Follow the steps below to help prevent taking pictures that appear blurry, out-of-focus or distorted.

If the camera has both an auto focus and manual focus mode, make sure it is set to auto focus. Make sure there is enough lighting to allow the camera to focus on the subject. Make sure the camera settings are set appropriately. When taking close-up or macro-type shots, ensure the subject is not closer than the minimum focus distance of the lens. Also, if the camera has a zoom option, set it to the W (wide-angle) position. If you have a fast-moving subject and the camera has a Program AE mode with a higher shutter speed (such as Sports action), make sure it is enabled. Also, if the camera has an ISO control, set it to a higher setting. If your camera has a SteadyShot/anti-blur function, ensure it is enabled. Aim the camera at the subject. Press the shutter button halfway down. NOTES:
Pressing the shutter button halfway down allows the camera to focus automatically. A flashing green indicator will be visible in the LCD or viewfinder. When the indicator stops flashing, focusing is finished and the camera is ready to take the picture. Some camera models have a Monitoring AF setting that can be selected which allows the camera to focus without the need to hold the button halfway down. Consult the instruction manual of the camera for information whether or not this is applicable for your model.

Jan 01, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

The distance focus ring, is it supposed to turn all the way to the macro symbol when you are focusing on a subject that is very close?


If you're right "on top" of the subject - then, yes - it should indicate "macro". Macro focusing is for "very up close" photography and is exactly as you describe. You simply physically move the camera a little closer to or further from the subject to focus.

Not all lenses are capable of macro focusing. The vast majority of these non-macro lenses are required to be at least a couple (or more) feet away to focus. Macro lenses on the other hand can usually get just inches away - which is a great capability.

Enjoy your macro lens!

Oct 12, 2010 | Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5 -5.6 USM Lens

1 Answer

I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

My Fuji S5100 now fails to properly focus. I have


1 ensure that your camera is not set in Macro mode test by taking a picture of a subject very close up ie. 10 - 15 cm if the image is in focus then you may be set in macro mode.
2 if lens is removeable ensure it is fitted properly. remove the lens and refit ensureing the connectors are clean.
3 ensure the switch on the lens or camera is set to AF for auto focus.
4 suspect autofocus sensor is defective if you try to focus on subjects which are close and far away and you do not hear to camera re-setting the focus then it is in manual focus or the focus sensor may be defective or in need of adjustment.

5 recommend specialist have a look at this problem.


Nov 16, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S5100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are out of focus on screen and when taken i cant seem to reajust the focus camera has been working fine untill i went to take a close up shot and now completely blurry .


If you are focusing On a subject make sure first that you are two feet away,

You can also try to turn On the blur reduction under setup menu. make sure also that your on auto mode or smart scene.

when taking picture indoor turn of the flash, you can do this by pressing the flash button On the camera

here are some basic troubleshooting

try to put your camera On a tripod or on the table to stabilize the camera then try to take a picture.

the technique of taking a picture Is first you need to half press first on the shutter button and you will noticed camera will adjust Now if the camera already adjusted pull press on the shutter button.

Blurry picture may caused if camera is not stabilized and may cause also if the flash will not fire correctly.

you may call tech support for further support toll free 1 800 235 6325



Nov 12, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare V550 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Back focus


That's not likely to be the camera but the lens. You can actually set a focussing pre-set for each lens you use on the D300. See your manual for more info.

Jul 04, 2009 | Nikon D300 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Instruction manual


Hi,

I have an FZ7K, here’s what I do:

#1. Set the mode dial on top of the camera to “A”.
#2. Set the aperture to the smallest f/number possible, f/2.8, f/3.2, f/3.3.
#3. Now take pictures standing as close to the subject as possible, (or zoom the lens).

For even better results, have the background farther away from your subject.

Aug 20, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Trouble focusing with sigma 70-300 DL macro super lens


It will not focus on anything closer than 5 feet.

(From Sigma lens literature)
Capable of macro photography, this lens has a 1:2 maximum close-up magnification at the 300 mm focal length. It's the ideal high performance lens for portraits, sports photography, nature photography, and other types of photography that frequently use the telephoto range. It also has a switch for changeover to macro photography at focal lengths between 200mm and 300mm with a maximum close-up magnification from 1:2.9 to 1:2. The minimum focusing distance is 1.5m / 59 in. at all zoom settings.

Dec 25, 2007 | Sigma AF 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 DL Macro Super...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

221 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Panasonic Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

72620 Answers

Computer Links

Level 3 Expert

2385 Answers

Are you a Panasonic Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...