Question about Linksys WRT160N Wireless Router

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Router won't connect to the internet.

The computers in the home network connect to the router but the router won't connect to the internet. All the settings are as they should be but it doesn't connect ot the internet.

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Bypass first the router and check if there is an internet connection. It might be no internet service at that moment.

Posted on Feb 26, 2009

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Connected to wifi but no internet connection


Wireless networks have become an increasingly popular way to access the Internet. Connecting to a wireless network allows you to browse the Internet without having to physically connect any cords to your computer.


Troubleshooting wireless connectivity can sometimes be confusing, because even if a wireless network is not able to bring you to any web pages, often your computer's wireless card will still connect to the wireless network that is being broadcast.


In other words, a wireless network will read "connected" even if it is not connected to the Internet.


Connect to a different wireless network. If there is an alternate wireless network within range of your computer that you legally are able to use (a free public Wi-Fi rather than your neighbor's wireless network, for instance), try connecting to it and browsing the Internet.


If the same issue occurs on the alternate wireless network, you may have an issue with your computer's wireless card or with your Internet browser.


If you are able to connect to the alternate network but still not able to connect to your own, the problem is most likely localized to the wireless network you use at home.


Reset all devices.

The great majority of Internet connection issues can be resolved by a simple reset of all the devices in your home network.


Locate the power cords of both your modem and your wireless router and unplug them (if you use a modem/router combination, simply unplug its power cord) for a full 30 seconds.


Plug them back in and restart your computer.

Try to connect to the Internet using your wireless network after your computer has booted back up.


If the connection still fails, some further troubleshooting is required.

Bypass your wireless router.


If your computer's wireless card is connecting to your wireless network of choice yet you are still not able to access any websites, there may be a connection issue on either your modem or router.


The easiest way to locate the problem is to temporarily eliminate the router from the network. Locate the Ethernet cable that connects your modem to your router and unplug it from the router.


Plug the cable directly into one of the Ethernet ports on your computer and reset the modem in the manner described above.


Now try your Internet connection again. If there is still no Internet access, the problem is most likely with your modem or your computer; contact the technical support department of your Internet service provider (ISP) for further assistance.


If the modem goes online directly connected, your router is causing the problem and may need to be reconfigured. Contact the router manufacturer for further assistance.


Hope this helps


Oct 24, 2012 | Cisco Linksys WRT54GX4 WirelessG Broadband...

Tip

CONFIGURATION OF A ROUTER EASY AND SIMPLEĀ  Now a days people find it so...


CONFIGURATION OF A ROUTER EASY AND SIMPLE 


Now a days people find it so difficult to do things their self kindly go through the setup yourself and you are through with the configuration .This is how to set up a router for home computer networks. The exact names of configuration settings on a network router vary depending on the model and whether it is wired or wireless. However, this general procedure will guide you through the process for the common kinds of home network equipment.
 
Here's How:
Choose a convenient location to begin installing your router such as an open floor space or table. This does not need to be the permanent location of the device. Particularly for wireless routers, you may find it necessary to re-position the unit after installing it as the cables / signals may not reach all areas needed. At the beginning, it’s better to choose a location where it's easiest to work with the router and worry about final placement later.
 
Plug in the router's electrical power source, and then turn on the router by pushing the power button.
 
(Optional) Connect your Internet modem to the router. Most network modems connect via an Ethernet cable but USB connections are becoming increasingly common. The cable plugs into the router jack named "WAN" or "uplink" or "Internet." After connecting the cable, be sure to power cycle (turn off and turn back on) the modem to ensure the router recognizes it.
 
Connect one computer to the router. Even if the router is a wireless model, connect this first computer to the router via a network cable. Using a cable during router installation ensures the maximum reliability of the equipment. Once a wireless router installation is complete, the computer can be changed over to a wireless connection if desired.
 
Open the router's administration tool. From the computer connected to the router, first open your Web browser. Then enter the router's address for network administration in the Web address field and hit return to reach the router's home page.
 
Many routers are reached by either the Web address "http://192.168.1.1" or "http://192.168.0.1" Consult your router's documentation to determine the exact address for your model. Note that you do not need a working Internet connection for this step.
 
Log in to the router. The router's home page will ask you for a username and password. Both are provided in the router's documentation. You should change the router's password for security reasons, but do this after the installation is complete to avoid unnecessary complications during the basic setup.
 
If you want your router to connect to the Internet, you must enter Internet connection information into that section of the router's configuration (exact location varies). If using DSL Internet, you may need to enter the PPPoE username and password. Likewise, if you have been issued a static IP address by your provider (you would need to have requested it), the static IP fields (including network mask and gateway) given to you by the provider must also must be set in the router.
 
If you were using a primary computer or an older network router to connect to the Internet, your provider may require you to update the MAC address of the router with the MAC address of the device you were using previously. Read How to Change a MAC Address for a detailed description of this process.
 
If this is a wireless router, change the network name (often called SSID). While the router comes to you with a network name set at the factory, you will never want to use this name on your network. Read How to Change the Router SSID for detailed instructions.
 
Verify the network connection is working between your one computer and the router. To do this, you must confirmed that the computer has received IP address information from the router. See How to Find IP Addresses for a description of this process.
 
(If applicable) Verify your one computer can connect to the Internet properly. Open your Web browser and visit a few Internet sites such as http://temabcomputerssolution.officelive.com/.
 
Connect additional computers to the router as needed. If connecting wirelessly, ensure the network name (SSID) of each is computer matches that of the router.
 
Finally, configure additional network security features as desired to guard your systems against Internet attackers. These WiFi Home Network Security Tips offer a good checklist to follow.
Tips:
When connecting devices with network cables, be sure each end of the cable connects tightly. Loose cables are one of the most common sources of network setup problems.
What You Need:
A network router (wireless or wired)
Network adapters installed on all devices to be connected to the router
A working Internet modem (optional)
A Web browser installed at least one computer in the network
 
 
 
 
www.temabcomputerssolution.blogspot.com

on May 20, 2010 | Routers

Tip

Multiple Computers on Same Network, Continual Internet Connection Dropout


After adding that second or third computer to your home network are you constantly fighting over who's using the internet connection? When your high schooler logs into his facebook chat, are you getting dropped off of your internet connection?
Or have you added a wifi router and is your whole network not staying connected like it did before you added your wifi?
These are common issues and we answer these questions often at FixYa.
Here is s a tip that will get you past the internet connection being dropped by someone else on your network attempting to log into the internet or help you get that wifi up and working with out all the cut outs and drop offs.

Follow this simple procedure and you'll be amazed!
1. Turn off everything. Turn off computers, routers, modem, printers... everything that's on your LAN (local area network) or home ethernet.
2. Turn on your wireless router next. With the ethernet cable connected to your wifi router to your modem and let it cycle up to running. If you aren't running wifi, do this with your main router. Make sure your modem and everything else is still off.
3. Turn on your modem (enet cable attached to wifi router or main router) and let the modem cycle up to running.

What you've done is allowed your wifi router to be established as the "MAC" Address for your modem. Modems look for a single MAC address. Once the router has this address, the router will maintain the connection with the modem and the internet, AND will assign MAC addresses to your computers, network printers, network routers etc, while still maintaining your connection to the internet.

4. Turn on all other peripherals, computers and network printers. At this point the order of power up isn't important, because your router will be assigning separate addresses to all the computers, etc on your network.

That's it! The secret's out! Just keep this handy... remember if you have power outage, you'll need to reboot in this order again... Happy Home Networking

on Dec 02, 2009 | Routers

1 Answer

Where do i enter my code


namastey! Choose a convenient location to begin installing your router such as an open floor space or table. This does not need to be the permanent location of the device. Particularly for wireless routers, you may find it necessary to re-position the unit after installing it as the cables / signals may not reach all areas needed.

Plug in the router's electrical power source, thenturn on the router by pushing the power button.

(Optional) Connect your Internet modem to the router. Most network modems connect via anEthernet cable but USB connections. After connecting the cable, be sure to power cycle (turn off and turn back on) the modem to ensure the router recognizes it.

Connect one computer to the router. Even if the router is a wireless model, connect this first computer to the router via a network cable.

Open the router's administration tool. From the computer connected to the router, first open your Web browser. Then enter the router's address for network administration in the Web address field and hit return to reach the router's home page.

log on the router. enter your username and password

If you want your router to connect to the Internet, you must enter Internet connection information into that section of the router's configuration (exact location varies). If using DSLInternet, you may need to enter the PPPoEusername and password. Likewise, if you have been issued a static IP address by your provider (you would need to have requested it), the static IP fields (including network mask and gateway) given to you by the provider must also must be set in the router.

If this is a wireless router, change the network name (often called SSID). While the router comes to you with a network name set at the factory, you will never want to use this name on your network. Read How to Change the Router SSID for detailed instructions.

Verify the network connection is working between your one computer and the router. To do this, you must confirmed that the computer has received IP address information from the router.

Verify your one computer can connect to the Internet

Connect additional computers to the router

Finally, configure additional network security features as desired to guard your systems against Internet attackers.

Aug 24, 2011 | Routers

2 Answers

I think i hve the router hooked up wrong how do i fix it


Connecting Multiple Computers
thru a router to internet






Tips on choosing the right network can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/setup/install.mspx





Since you said there are other computer in the house I assume they will all
go thru the router. I also assume you are using ethernet to connect the new
computer so it will be a "wired" connection. A rounter can also have wireless
connections if the other computers have wireless internet on the other
computers.



To connect more than one computer to the Internet, you need a router.
A router allows you to connect several computers to each other and to the
Internet. The router sits between your computers and the modem provided by your
ISP. You connect the router to the modem, and then connect all your computers to
the router.



68573-router-diagram.gif



To connect a router and multiple computers to the
Internet


Contact an Internet service provider (ISP) and have them configure
an Internet connection to your home. If possible, have the ISP place the modem
in the room with your primary computer.



Connect your router to your modem in one of the two following
ways:

If you currently have a computer connected directly to your
modem:
Unplug the network cable from the back of your computer, and
plug it into the port labeled Internet, WAN,
or WLAN on the back of your router.



If you don't currently have your computer connected to the
Internet:
Plug one end of a network cable (included with your router)
into your modem, and the other end of the network cable into the
Internet, WAN, or WLAN port
on your router.

68573-connect-modem-to-router-small.jpg



Plug in your router. After a minute or two, the Internet, WAN, or WLAN light
on your router should light up, indicating that it has successfully connected to
your modem.

68573-internet-port-small.jpg


Determine whether your computer has a network adapter, and add one if
necessary. Instructions to determine if you have a network adaptor or to install
a Network adaptor can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/setup/netadapter.mspx



Shut down your computer by clicking Start and then clicking
Turn Off Computer. Then click Turn Off.



Connect the network cable to your computer's network adapter.



68573-connect-computer-small.jpg


Connect the other end of the network cable to your network equipment.



68573-connect-to-router-small.jpg


Start your computer and log on to Windows. Windows automatically detects that
you are connected to the Internet.

Repeat steps 6, 7, and 8 for each one of your computers. If you have a
computer in a different room you can find instructions at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/setup/wired.m

Feb 15, 2011 | Zonet ZSR4154WE 80211N Wireless Broadband...

1 Answer

How do i hook up my router?


There are several ways to do this, depending on how your network is configured.

Generally, if you have only one router - you connect the network jack of your cable modem or DSL modem to the WAN ("wide area network" or "internet") jack of the router with a CAT 5 network cable or jumper. Each computer's network jack would be connected to one of the router's (4) LAN ("local area network" or "home network") jacks labeled 1, 2, 3, & 4.

steve_con_12.jpg
In the picture above, the left most jack (WAN) of the router connects to the cable or DSL modem. The "LAN" jacks labeled "1, 2, 3 & 4" connect to each computer's network jack in your home.

The above would change if you are simply adding this router to extend an existing network. You'd likely be using this router as a switch, and leaving the routing duties to the main router. Over simplified, all the CAT 5 network cables would be connected to the 4 LAN jacks. There would be no connection to the router's WAN jack because the output of the first router provides only private IP addresses used in YOUR location. The internet IP address from your ISP is used only at the first router so that your entire home has the single IP address. The WAN jack is for internet addresses only - and the LAN jacks are for local / private addresses in your home only.

Have a look at the LinkSys web site for help configuring your particular model router, or reply with the model and version here.

I hope this helps & good luck. Please rate my reply - thanks!

Jan 28, 2011 | Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router

1 Answer

Hello wots an router somthing to do withs to internet and how do reinstall it


To understand what a router does, you need to know a little bit about how the Internet works. The Internet, the huge world-wide computer network that we surf the World Wide Web on, uses the TCP/IP networking protocol. Data sent over a TCP/IP network is broken down into chunks called "packets", and in order for these packets to get where they need to go on the Internet, something is needed to route them to their destinations (hence the name router). The many networks that make up the Internet are connected to each other by routers, and the routers determine what packets go where. Routers are level 3 devices on the OSI model, which means that they function at the network layer. The OSI model has 7 levels, and each one represents a function when it comes to data communication between two or more computers on a computer network. To understand what I'm talking about in the next paragraph, you need to know about the OSI model and what layer the router represents.

When the average computer user thinks of a router, they probably think of the kind that you can purchase at your local computer store, as opposed to the big ones that route packets on the Internet. That smaller kind of router allows you to share an Internet connection with multiple computers without having to use a computer that acts as a "gateway". If you have a computer network at home and the center of it is a hub or a switch, you need to use a computer that acts as a gateway ("host" computer), as hubs and switches cannot do what a router does (hubs and switches are two other devices that you can purchase at your local computer store to create a network between two or more computers). A router can "intelligently" route TCP/IP packets to IP addresses (unique identifiers on a TCP/IP network) at layer 3, while a hub is just a dumb layer 1 device that sends out packets to all of the computers attached to it, regardless of who sent them out and who they're intended for. A switch is a layer 2 device that routes Ethernet frames by MAC address; Ethernet is a networking standard that home networks are based on, a frame is the Ethernet equivalent of a TCP/IP packet (chunk of data), and a MAC address is a computer's unique identifier at layer 2 (datalink) on an Ethernet network. Although a switch is "smarter" than a hub, it still can't do what a router does. The functions that a router performs are necessary for communication between the computers on your network and computers on other networks on the Internet at the network layer (TCP/IP). Probably the most important thing that a router does is perform NAT, which stands for Network Address Translation. NAT is a technology that allows computers on a network behind an Internet connection to communicate with computers outside the network; to the rest of the Internet the network is a single IP address (the one your ISP gave you), and NAT allows for incoming and outgoing connections between the computers on the network who have their own "internal" IP addresses and the computers outside the network who see only the ISP-assigned IP address. A "gateway" computer using Internet connection sharing software like the kind that Windows comes with performs the same functions as a hardware router, but there are some disadvantages that come with using that setup, like how all of the computers on the network lose Internet access if the gateway computer is offline. If you want to share an Internet connection between two or more computers in your home, a hardware router is the best thing to get for it.

Dec 04, 2009 | Belkin Wireless G Plus MIMO (F5D9230-4)...

1 Answer

I dont know crouter configuration


Dear sir, Here's How:
  1. Choose a convenient location to begin installing your router such as an open floor space or table. This does not need to be the permanent location of the device. Particularly for wireless routers, you may find it necessary to re-position the unit after installing it as the cables / signals may not reach all areas needed. At the beginning, its better to choose a location where it's easiest to work with the router and worry about final placement later.

  2. Plug in the router's electrical power source, then turn on the router by pushing the power button.

  3. (Optional) Connect your Internet modem to the router. Most network modems connect via an Ethernet cable but USB connections are becoming increasingly common. The cable plugs into the router jack named "WAN" or "uplink" or "Internet." After connecting the cable, be sure to power cycle (turn off and turn back on) the modem to ensure the router recognizes it.

  4. Connect one computer to the router. Even if the router is a wireless model, connect this first computer to the router via a network cable. Using a cable during router installation ensures the maximum reliability of the equipment. Once a wireless router installation is complete, the computer can be changed over to a wireless connection if desired.

  5. Open the router's administration tool. From the computer connected to the router, first open your Web browser. Then enter the router's address for network administration in the Web address field and hit return to reach the router's home page.

    Many routers are reached by either the Web address "http://192.168.1.1" or "http://192.168.0.1" Consult your router's documentation to determine the exact address for your model. Note that you do not need a working Internet connection for this step.

  6. Log in to the router. The router's home page will ask you for a username and password. Both are provided in the router's documentation. You should change the router's password for security reasons, but do this after the installation is complete to avoid unnecessary complications during the basic setup.

  7. If you want your router to connect to the Internet, you must enter Internet connection information into that section of the router's configuration (exact location varies). If using DSL Internet, you may need to enter the PPPoE username and password. Likewise, if you have been issued a static IP address by your provider (you would need to have requested it), the static IP fields (including network mask and gateway) given to you by the provider must also must be set in the router.

  8. If you were using a primary computer or an older network router to connect to the Internet, your provider may require you to update the MAC address of the router with the MAC address of the device you were using previously. Read How to Change a MAC Address for a detailed description of this process.

  9. If this is a wireless router, change the network name (often called SSID). While the router comes to you with a network name set at the factory, you will never want to use this name on your network. Read How to Change the Router SSID for detailed instructions.

  10. Verify the network connection is working between your one computer and the router. To do this, you must confirmed that the computer has received IP address information from the router. See How to Find IP Addresses for a description of this process.

  11. (If applicable) Verify your one computer can connect to the Internet properly. Open your Web browser and visit a few Internet sites such as http://compnetworking.about.com/.

  12. Connect additional computers to the router as needed. If connecting wirelessly, ensure the network name (SSID) of each is computer matches that of the router.

  13. Finally, configure additional network security features as desired to guard your systems against Internet attackers. These WiFi Home Network Security Tips offer a good checklist to follow.
Tips:
  1. When connecting devices with network cables, be sure each end of the cable connects tightly. Loose cables are one of the most common sources of network setup problems.
What You Need:
  • A network router (wireless or wired)
  • Network adapters installed on all devices to be connected to the router
  • A working Internet modem (optional)
  • A Web browser installed at least one computer in the network

regards
murali

Aug 27, 2009 | Macsense XRouter Pro MIH-130A (MIH-130A/6)

1 Answer

Please Help! My IP is driving me crazy!


modem only transmits signal.

router talks to your provider and gets IP address from them, depending on your subscription, you may have a static or dynamic IP.

your computer gets internal (home network) IP from the router, you don't have to worry about that since it is the router's IP address that is seen on the internet (router splits / shares a single internet connection in home networks).

about wireless connection from computers/wi-fi gadgets to the router, must configure the router with the ff:

wireless network name (aka SSID)
security type (WPA/WEP) and password/passphrase/security key
channel (1-12)

the above info must be then set to the connecting computers/gadgets

about wired connection: a working ethernet cable (looks like a phone cord but fatter) and a working computer/gadget ethernet port.


Wii will work - check Wii's website for connectivity options / instructions.

Dec 18, 2008 | NetGear WGR614 Router

1 Answer

Weak connection on one computer in network


set the wireless channel for you router to the maximum level and save the changes

Nov 13, 2008 | Linksys Wireless-G WRT54G Router

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