Question about Coby DVD-958 Theater System

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Does this system have traditional speaker wire connections

For example, I already have speaker wiring in my walls for the surround speakers. Will the speakers on this system work with that existing wire?

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Yes.

Connect the appropriate wire(s) from the DVD-958 speaker connection(s) on the back of the unit to the wall connection(s). You should match the impediance of the speaker to the unit.

Posted on Feb 28, 2009

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My panasonic says f61 when i switch it on wat do i do


An F61 error occurs on a Panasonic home theater system when the speaker cable wire connections are wrong. This situation is likely to happen if you just purchased your unit or moved the system and try to reconnect the speakers again. Polarity is key in a successful setup. The positive and negative ends of the cable wires must match the input of the main unit. Retrace your speaker wire connections to clear error F61.
Step 1 Attach the speaker labels to the speaker wires for easier identification, if they're not already labeled. At minimum, labels for front left (L), front right (R) and center speakers should be included in the packaging contents that came with your system.
Step 2 Verify that the white ends of each speaker cable are connected to the corresponding "+" positive inputs for each speaker.
Step 3 Verify that the blue ends of each speaker cable are connected to the corresponding "-" negative inputs for each speaker.
Step 4 Push the plastic ends of the speaker wires on each speaker to verify that each is locked into place.
Step 5 Connect the remaining end of the "Front (L)" speaker wire to the white terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 6 Connect the remaining end of the "Front (R)" speaker wire to the red terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 7 Connect the remaining end of the "Center" speaker wire to the green terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 8 Connect the remaining end of the "Subwoofer" wire to the purple terminal/connector on the main unit.
Step 9 Connect the remaining ends of the "Surround (R)" and "Surround (L)" speakers to the wireless system.

Sep 11, 2016 | Panasonic Audio Players & Recorders

Tip

How to set up a seven-speaker home theater system


Set up a home theater

How to connect your speakers

In order to deliver surround sound, home theater systems require 5, 6, or even 7 speakers--and that's not even counting the subwoofer. Connecting all those speakers together can be quite a challenge, so here's a quick overview of the basics.

If you don't have an all-in-one, home-theater-in-a-box system, you'll probably need to supply your own speaker cables. There are several different types available--they vary in terms of wire size (or gauges) and termination types. Make sure you pick cable that's a good match for your speakers and receiver. And make sure they're long enough; the rear-channel cables in particular will be stretching all the way around the room.

Once you've selected your system and have all your speakers ready to set up, begin by placing each speaker at or near its intended location. Then, attach the cables to them one by one. After securely fastening one end of the cable to the speaker, connect the other end to the appropriate speaker output on the back of the A/V receiver. Be sure to connect the cable to the correctly labeled output.

For instance, the front-right speaker wire needs to go to the terminal labeled front-right. Also, make sure that each speaker connection is in phase, meaning negative to negative and positive to positive. Otherwise, your system's sound will sound out of whack. Repeat the process for every speaker in your system. Note that the subwoofer uses a coaxial-style RCA cable instead of standard speaker wire.

Once all the wires are connected, you should test the system with several DVDs and CDs, to ensure that everything is in working order.

For our first example, we used an elaborate 7.1-channel system, so it may have 1, 2, or several more speakers than your system. Some systems even employ wireless rear speakers, or virtual surround-surround modes that simulate multichannel experience from 3, 2, or even 1 speaker. And some listeners still prefer good old stereo sound from 2 speakers. No matter what type of speaker setup you prefer, however, the wiring basics remain the same.

How to position surround-sound speakers and a subwoofer
To get the best performance from a surround-sound speaker system, you must install each speaker in the correct location. There are three basic types of surround-sound speaker systems.

  • The 5.1-channel system has five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.

  • 6.1-channel systems have six satellites and a subwoofer.

  • And 7.1-channel systems have seven satellites and a subwoofer.

Start by placing the center speaker either directly above or directly below your TV. The center speaker can be perched atop a direct-view TV or mounted on the wall. Aim the center speaker at ear level.

In most cases, the front-left and front-right speakers can be wall mounted or placed on stands. However, if your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, they should not be wall mounted. Space your front-left and front-right speakers the same distance apart as the distance between your center speaker and your listening position. Position the front-left and front-right speakers no more than two feet above or below the front-center speaker. The tweeters in the front-left and front-right speakers should be roughly at ear level relative to your seating position.

Ideally, the surround-left and surround-right speakers should be mounted on the side walls of your room, slightly behind or parallel to your listening position. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports, place them on stands instead. If installing the speakers on the side walls isn't practical, you can mount them on the room's rear wall or place them on stands behind your listening position. The surround speakers can be installed up to two feet above the front speakers.

Also, 6.1 surround systems have a back-center speaker. You'll typically mount this on the rear wall of your room, centered behind your seating position. Position the back-center speaker no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speaker has a rear-panel bass port or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the back center speaker on a stand instead. The back-center speaker should be installed at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

Instead of a single back speaker, 7.1 surround systems use a back-left and a back-right speaker. These, too, are typically mounted on the rear wall of your room. Position the back-left and back-right speakers so that each is approximately aligned with the left and right edges of your listening position. Place the back-left and back-right speakers no more than six feet behind the surround-left and surround-right speakers. If your speakers have rear-panel bass ports,or if the rear wall is too far behind your seating position, place the speakers on stands instead. Install the back-left and back-right speakers at the same height as the surround-left and surround-right speakers.

A subwoofer is the last component of a 5, 6, or 7.1 system. Because bass frequencies are nondirectional, you can place the subwoofer in various locations. You may get the best performance by installing the subwoofer in the front of the room, approximately six inches from the wall. If you want more bass, try placing the sub near a corner in the front of the room.

Connect your DVD player to your A/V receiver--digitally
To hear a movie's soundtrack in surround sound, you must first connect your DVD player to an A/V surround-sound receiver. You'll need to make what is called a multi-channel-compatible connection.

The easiest way to do this is to use a cable that carries a digital signal. There are two digital options: optical and coaxial.

An optical digital connection, also called TosLink, uses pulses of light to deliver a digital signal. According to some experts, one advantage of optical digital connections is that optical cables don't pick up noise, while lower-quality coaxial cables can. Many, but not all, DVD players have an optical output. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple optical inputs. Plug one end of the optical cable into the DVDs player's optical-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's optical input.

Finally, you need to tell your receiver to use the optical connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. This is called assigning the input. Information about this simple process can be found in your A/V receiver's manual.

A second option is a coaxial digital connection. This type of connection is also used for cable TV, but the connectors are different. This type of coaxial cable has an RCA connector. Coaxial cables are less expensive than optical ones. In fact, you can use any old RCA cable to make a coaxial digital connection, and you won't lose any audio quality.

Most, but not all, DVD players, have a coaxial output. Some have coaxial and optical outputs, so you get a choice. Audiophiles argue over which connection is better, but it's very hard to hear the difference. Most A/V receivers have at least one and usually multiple coaxial inputs. Plug one end of the coaxial cable into the DVD player's coaxial-out jack. Plug the other end into the receiver's coaxial input.

Finally, tell your receiver to use the coaxial connection whenever you switch to the DVD input. Again, your A/V receiver's manual will have instructions for assigning an input.

on Aug 13, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

Tip

How to set up a six speaker home theater surround sound system


This walk through is for a six speaker setup but can be used for any type. First you will have a sub., a center speaker, a surround L and R, and a front L and R. Most likely your speaker wire (silvery wire) will have a colored tip at end. This tip will show where the wire fits into the bluray or DVD player and what speaker it goes to. I am going to use the Surround Right or S.R. as an example because most the speakers are very similar to set up. The S.R. is (at least for me) a smaller black speaker with a gray sticker on the back indicating what wire should be use for it. The S.R. should be hung behind the main seat (Sofa, Chair, Etc.) and to your right side. and the wire should be ran around the ceiling to the DVD or Bluray player (its good to hide it behind wall edging or pictures) and then fit the colored piece at the end of the cord into the correct colored slot at the back of the player. If necessary use a staple gun to attach the wire to the the back of the wall edging (make sure the staples are not visible because I guarantee you won't want it there forever. Also, make sure to not tear or puncture the wire with the staple. Repeat this step for all the other speakers. Your setup should look some thing like this


Left Front Sp.////////// Center Sp. /////////// Right Front Sp.
//////////////////////sub. (directly below)////////////////

...................................Sofa.........................................

Left Surround ////////////////////////////////////// Right Surround

on Dec 04, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How to connect my JVC Audio/video control receiver digital surround sound system


Hi,
Need to know how to set up a surround sound system? It's fairly easy, with the right equipment. Surround sound gives you that "theater" feel in your own home.
For more information on optimizing the sound of your chosen system visit:
http://www.ehow.com/how_3393_set-surround-sound.html.
To set up a surround sound system go to:
http://forum.ecoustics.com/bbs/messages/34579/219978.html.

Additionally,Some people prefers a wire diagram to connect their surround sound system. The basic concept to connect any audio system is to follow the path of sound from its origin to its final output stage, either headphones or speakers. There are other basic premises to follow, such as the impedance of the speakers and the output of the amplifier, but the concept is to start with an input and terminate each input to an output somewhere on the amplifier unit.
A wire diagram shows a picture that represents where each of these wires would go in considerably little detail. One example would be that a television set starts with a signal from somewhere, broadcast or cable, and comes out of that antenna and goes into the surround sound amplifier. The sound is processed in some way and the video is output to the television set and the audio is output to the speakers or headphones. Although complicated in textual from, most find that a wire diagram is much easier to follow.
For an example of a wire diagram for a surround sound system visit ..

http://www.crutchfield.com/.

Take care and please Remember to rate/vote and give me 4 Thumbs Up
for Helping out the Community :)

Hope this helps!

Jun 23, 2011 | JVC Televison & Video

1 Answer

I have no idea how to connect these speakers all I have is the wires for the 5 speakers and a power cord for the sub any help please?


You have not mentioned -- connect it to what ???. Assuming that its an AV receiver. Start by connecting the front three speakers to the the amplifiers speaker sockets labeled Left front / Center / Right Front. These are connected using three short wires. Then connect the two surround speakers using the pair of long speaker cables. You will need a RCA to RCA cable to connect the subwoofer to the Receivers subwoofer preamp out.The subwoofer also requires an A/C wall socket to power it.

Mar 08, 2011 | Cerwin Vega AVS-5.1 System

1 Answer

When I hook up the rear speakers to my in-wall speakers, I can't get any sound. I have speaker button 1 and 2 selected.


Hi:
you need to clear that you connect wall speakers for font,center or rear (surround) speakers?
Seem you connect for Front speaker.
Rear (surround) speaker will have "rear" mark on the back of your reveiver.
In general you need to select both buttons 1 & 2 then check your speaker wires connect into "output1" or "output 2" hint: each output will have 1 for left and 1 for right speaker. Each Left or right speaker will have 2 connection 1 red color (+) and 1 white color (-). Try to match these colors code for your speakers connection.

Feb 25, 2011 | JVC RX-884V Receiver

1 Answer

The sound only comes out of 2 speakers - (shows only 2 speakers on display). When the display shows all 5 speakers, we dont get any sound at all. Can you help


Aside from connecting the black wires and the red wires in their correct places, if you have a blown speaker in the center or surround, it will cause the others not to work.
Here are something things to look for:
1 not every wire is suitable. Most wires are ok, but have natural resistance that prevents some of the signal from reaching the speaker. (impedance, measured in OHMS.)
2. Most of the newer systems have rca or banana connectors to insure clean interfaces.
The reviews I read on this product do not inspire me to go out and buy one, so if you can still choose something else consider it sooner rather than later.
3 the amplifier for the surround sound speakers may already be damage
Try every speaker on the output that works. That way you can tell if the speakers are the problem or if it is the amplifier.
Good luck.

Sep 26, 2010 | Panasonic SC-HT900 System

1 Answer

Just purchased SBHS100AE-K rear speakers to connect to my SC-BT100. I want to connect them wired rather than purchase the wireless transmitter, but I can't figure out how to connect the wired rear speakers...


This unit is not as flexible as traditional receivers are as far as speakers are concerned. Speakers are labeled and *must* be connected to the correct speaker terminals.

Upon reading the manual - it is quite apparent that the only provisions for rear surround speaker connections is <i>only</i> via the optional wireless transmitter / receiver hardware. The optional digital transmitter is connected via a proprietary plug on the rear of the SC-BT100. The optional receiver amplifies the received signal and passes it to the connected surround speakers. I would bet that there are no provisions for amplifying a surround L and R speaker channel inside the SC-BT100, and that it only provides a low level (like a "tape out") or un-amplified signal to the transmitter plug. Even if you were to manage to get the surround speaker connections made up there - you would not be able to hear anything from them - as there is no amplifier. The amplifier is contained in the wireless receiver, and is largely why it requires a connection to house current.

Unfortunately, I doubt you'll find a way to listen the surround channel audio from the SC-BT100 without the optional transmitter / receiver and the integrated amplifier.

You can review the manual like I did here:
http://service.us.panasonic.com/OPERMANPDF/SCBT100.PDF

I hope this answered your question.

Jun 11, 2010 | Panasonic SC-BT100 Theater System

1 Answer

Connection between harmon receiver and A-bus in wall speakers...


There is a CAT5/RJ45 A-Bus interface on the back of the HK AVR 435. That needs to connect to your A-BUS "hub". HK has two hub products: ABH-4000 and ABH-4 (older). Then CAT5 cable can be run from this hub to Wall-installed room-specific controls. HK has the AB-2 product, but any ABus compatible wall control will work. From the wall control, you wire regular audio cable to the speakers. So, some of the questions/issues to solve are: where do the existing wires go that are connected to the in-wall speakers? Typically that location is where to place your in-wall volume and source controls. Then the CAT5 gets wired from those controls back to the hub. And all that's required is a single CAT5 from the AVR to the Hub.

Apr 04, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Rear speakers


THE 4 WIRES SHOULD BE FROM THE REAR SPEAKERS THEY GET WIRED INTO THE SURROUND SPEAKER OUT POSTS ON YOUR AMP (MAKE SURE YOU DO NOT GO INTO SURROUND BACK THIS IS FOR 6.1 AND 7.1 SYSTEMS).WHAT ARE THE WALL UNITS? NEED MORE INFO TO TRY TO HELP.

HOPE THIS HELPED A BIT.

CABLE GUY

Feb 13, 2008 | Onkyo TX-SR605 Receiver

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