Question about Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Photo appears saturated green when set on manual setting

When shooting a hockey game yesterday I noticed when setting my custom WB photo was green, if set to an auto setting everything appeared normal, have looked through the menu setup and all appears normal. Color settings at zero etc. Where else can I look to be sure all settings are default? I have to have hit something - frustrating as I prefer using manual settings to auto
Thanks in advance for your help.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Contributor
  • 54 Answers

The image you selected for Custom WB is probably inappropriate - it may be shot somewhere else with different lighting or not enough of the image is white/grey. To do a proper Custom WB, take a picture of a white or grey card in the same lighting conditions as your subject. Go to menu, select Custom WB and choose that image. Then set your WB mode to Custom (if it's not already).

When you move to another site to take other photos, you must change your Custom WB image to another 'current' one. As the sun progresses through the day, your Custom WB will need to change as well. Auto WB will, in most conditions, be able to deal with changing light if you prefer not to keep updating your Custom WB.

Posted on Apr 30, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

When i take pictures they show with a pink color? i reset the camera to factory settings but still same pink pics advise?


This FE-340 Olympus is a great camera. Lots of features and usually great results
  • Indoor pictures with flash set on auto WB (white balance) should not be a problem
  • Indoor pictures without flash requires setting the WB to match the light source in the room (incandescent, florescent etc) Outdoor pictures WB on auto generally not a problem
For more help Include a photo with the metadata of the photo from the image data file

Dec 02, 2015 | Olympus FE-340 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I have a canon 40d digital camera that I am having a hard time taking pictures indoors - they come out bluury and with a yellow tinge - I work mostly in M so I control the light with 1600 ISO - ANy ideas...


Yes you need to change the white balance (WB). If the pix are yellow it is because the white balance is set to daylight and you are shooting under tungsten(orange) and/or fluorescent (bluey green).
Try the WB in auto but sometimes auto doesn't work perfectly, or if shooting under tungsten only change to tungsten etc
If you want to be sure to get the correct balance shoot a white card slightly underexposed and correct it afterwards in whatever photo software you use.
The blurry is caused by too low a shutter speed but if already at 1600 iso you cant go much higher without running into noise problems so use a flash gun on auto.
I hope I have been of help but please do not hesitate to ask if you have any further questions.

I appreciate your vote if you appreciate my reply and remember, even if you don't vote for me a please and thank you goes a long way

Mar 07, 2011 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

1 Answer

I HAVE A GR2 DIGITAL CAMERA. I usually shoot in manual mode and and set white balance manually using a digital callabration target. Yesterday afternoon, after shooting most of theday without problems, my...


I doubt that formatting the card will do anything but, if you choose to do that, download any pics first since formatting will completely erase the card. Have you tried going back to "Auto WB" to see if your camera works properly that way? How about going into the menu and finding "reset" to get back to factory default settings?

Nov 23, 2010 | Ricoh GR Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am a surgeon when I take pictures of muscle or bloody objects the red color seems to melt and the red is overly saturated and all sharpness and definition to the photo is lost usually taken with a...


The Fuji S2 sensor is noted for this red sensitivity. Here's a few different approaches to getting the shot with the S2, all of which require some experimentation.

1. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Underexpose the shot. Progressively change the exposure compensation downward until when checking the histogram, the red channel does not show saturation at the high end. Advantages: this is the simplest approach to getting the picture. Disadvantages: the S2 already had a fairly limited dynamic range, and this will make things worse for the parts of the photo that are not red. For the surgical setting and use of a ringflash, this may not be much of a disadvantage, since a lot of the stuff of interest will be red, and ringflash illumination generally is of lower contrast than directional lighting.

2. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Use a custom white balance. The idea here is to have the camera adjust the red channel sensitivity itself, and leave the blue and green channels alone. To do this, start with several sheets of white paper and a red or pink marker or highlighter. Scribble with the marker across a sheet, then use that to set a custom white balance. Take a test shot of the red stuff that has been problematic, and see whether the histogram for the red channel shows that there is no saturation at the high end. Repeat this with progressively more red or pink on each sheet used to set the custom white balance until you find the custom white balance that takes enough of the edge off the red channel response. Alternative: I just tried out making a gradient across an 8.5x11" sheet of paper going from white to about 30% red saturation. I can set more or less red adjustment in a custom white balance just by pointing the camera at different parts of the page. This seems to work OK for me. Advantage: can allow the full dynamic range of the sensor to be used. Disadvantages: the experimentation period is likely to take a while to get the best results, and the final images are unlikely to look completely natural.

3. Set the "Color" Function option to "B/W". Use a green or cyan filter on the lens to cut the amount that the red color channel contributes to the final image. Advantages: this is fairly simple as an approach. A similar post-processing technique can be applied to the photos that you already have, by nulling out the red channel contribution and desaturating the blue and green channels to produce a grayscale image. Disadvantages: you lose the color information entirely. Since much of what you want information about is colored red anyway, the organs are likely to appear quite dark when only taking the blue and green channel contributions to the image.

Feb 26, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

1 Answer

I have a canon xl1s video camera. I was shooting last night and I noticed that the color's were changing, I think due to a witebalance issue. I had the camera on manual wite balance. This is a new problem....


If it was set to one of the three manual WB settings & the lighting changed [fluorescent tube to incandescent light bulbs, this will happen & all you need to do is either re-WB with the new light, or set it to auto & let the camera figure it out itself.

Oct 14, 2008 | Canon Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Canon 20D strong blue cast to pictures


You probably have the White Balance set to a setting other a
than "Auto White Balance" (AWB). On the top of the camera, above the exterior LCD panel, there is the "AF-WB" button. Turn the camera on--past "on" to the bent line. Press the AF-WB button once. On the left side of the exterior LCD panel there is a vertical, reticular box with the symbol of the selected setting for WB. Normally, the setting should be set to AWB. If it is not, turn the command dial at the back of the camera until "AWB" is showing. Try shooting again-the color should be better.

In the "auto" modes (green box, portrait, landscape, etc) the AWB is automatically set. In the "advanced" modes (P,Tv, etc) the WB is manually set for whatever light source you are using. The command dial may have been accidently turned to different setting. Hope this helps.

Jan 23, 2008 | Canon EOS-20D Body only Digital Camera

2 Answers

Manual white balance


Click the AF-WB button and then with the wheel in the back of the camera select either K or any of the other settings. If set to K then you must go to your Menu (click menu button on back) then go to Color temp. and select your Kelvin tempature. Hope that helps....

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon EOS-10D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Color Problems


I know this contribution might be late, but try to avoid using the auto white balance. Use a tungsten mode and test each of its compensations until you get the desired result. I haven't had a similar problem on the 14n, but my D100 always places a magenta cast on white when shooting auto WB. I learned how to adapt the other WB modes to any situation.

Sep 13, 2005 | Kodak DCS 14n Digital Camera

4 Answers

Flash pictures too blue - optio 750z - help?


Try playing with the exposure compensation lever. Turn it down a few notches when you use flash. I do that all the time to prevent over exposure Or you can set the flash compensation in the setup.

Aug 30, 2005 | Pentax Optio 750Z Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera Logo

99 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon Digital Cameras Experts

Doberman

Level 2 Expert

246 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2598 Answers

halotheracer
halotheracer

Level 2 Expert

68 Answers

Are you a Canon Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...