Question about HP Compaq d530 SFF PC Desktop

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I need wiring diagram for hp computer motherboard. Mainly the IDE cables. It appears that it is a Phoenix Bios Pentium IV

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  • May 11, 2010

    IDE cables just plug in at both ends, and are keyed so you shouldn't have any problems. What specifically do you need to know or is giving you problems?

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  • 11 Answers

Ya u cand find that kind of features in the www.softpedia.com

Posted on Feb 23, 2009

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BIOS-upgrade not working. Now Bios needs Passw. And a license is gone...


Locate Phoenix BIOS Passwords

The basic input/output system, or BIOS, is a program that acts as a digital liaison, managing communications between peripherals and the operating system.

Because the BIOS is critical to the operation of a PC, some computer manufacturers and workplaces employ a password for security.

If the password is lost or has been reset through electrostatic discharge, it would be impossible to guess without the aid of computer forensics.

Sometimes you can gain access to the BIOS through the keyboard, depending on the computer, but typically the solution is mechanical.

Contact your computer manufacturer.
All computer manufacturers have websites with technical support available.
1
Have your computer model number and serial number ready.
If the manufacturer is unable to help locate a password, standard back-door passwords may help.

2
So-called back-door passwords may help you access the BIOS.
Try using the following back-door passwords to access the BIOS: phoenix, PHOENIX, CMOS, BIOS. BIOS passwords are case sensitive.

3
Contact the motherboard's manufacturer if the back-door passwords failed.
Find the motherboard's website for technical support.
You will need to open the computer case if you do not know the motherboard brand.

4
Electrostatic discharge can reset a BIOS password.
Shutdown and unplug the computer.
Unplug the monitor and all peripherals from the PC, including speakers and USB devices.

Ground yourself by wearing an antistatic wristband clipped to the metal case, or touch something metal before you open the case.
Use the screwdriver to loosen and remove the screws from the case. Look for the motherboard, the largest circuit board inside, attached to one side of the case.

5
Printing on a motherboard can be hard to see without a magnifying glass.
Examine the motherboard for a brand name.

A good place to start searching is near the processor, the large square box on the motherboard. A flashlight and magnifying glass are especially useful for a clear view of the motherboard.
The brand name could be printed anywhere or, sometimes, not at all.

6
The motherboard battery is round and fairly flat.
Locate the CMOS battery while you have the case open.

If contacting the motherboard manufacturer failed, you will have to remove the battery.
The battery is circular, about the size of a dime, but as thick as two to three stacked dimes.

Do not disconnect or remove anything yet.
Removing the CMOS Battery

7
Note the location of any cables that need to be disconnected.
Use the digital camera to take pictures of the motherboard, or sketch the location of cables and connectors.
f any components or cables need to be moved or unplugged to reach the battery, you want to remember their exact location.

8
Leave the battery out for at least 20 minutes.
Remove the CMOS battery carefully so as not to snap or break the clamps.
Leave the battery out for 20 to 25 minutes to allow the capacitors to completely discharge any memory. Avoid touching anything else in the computer.

9
Tighten the case screws when done.
Return the battery to the motherboard, and reconnect any cables that were disconnected in the case. Close the computer case and tighten the screws.

10
Look for the setup message on the monitor.
Turn on the computer and closely watch the monitor for the "Entering Setup" message that appears before Windows starts.

The message will tell you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup.
You may need to reboot a few times to see the message, as it appears on the screen for just a few seconds.

11
Carefully read the settings information on the monitor.
Follow the directions on the monitor for changing the date, boot sequence, and any other settings.

Work slowly and read the screen directions thoroughly.
Be alert and cautious.

Once the settings are saved, the system will start, and the password will have been removed.


http://www.computerhope.com/help/phoenix.htm
Phoenix BIOS help and simulation
Recover Phoenix BIOS
Although most people think the operating system is the core software required for a computer to run, without the computer's BIOS, then the operating system cannot even launch.

When a BIOS installation encounters a problem, it can cause components of the computer not to function correctly or it can cause the computer itself not to function at all.

It is possible to recover the BIOS of a computer, if you know what sort of BIOS the computer's motherboard uses.

The recovery process should take approximately 5 to 10 minutes, during which your computer will seem mostly unresponsive.

Download a crisis recovery program designed specifically to restore damaged or otherwise non-functioning copies of Phoenix BIOS.

Read the instructions for using the recovery program to make sure that no specific changes or configurations need to be done to it before it is used.


Place the Phoenix BIOS recovery program and its files onto a blank disc or a USB drive according to the program's instructions (this usually simply consists of extracting the files from an archive.)
Once the program and its files are in place, insert the disc into the computer's drive or plug the USB drive into an available USB port.

Hold down both the Windows key and the "B" key on your keyboard and press the power button on the computer.

(On some laptop computers, you will need to press the "Fn-B" keys instead.)

Wait for the disc drive light or the USB drive access light to start flickering to show that the computer is accessing the Phoenix BIOS recovery program, and then release the keys.

Wait patiently while the Phoenix BIOS recovery program overwrites the damaged sections of the motherboard's current BIOS installation.

Depending on the computer and the recovery program used, the computer may or may not reboot once BIOS recovery is complete.

If the computer does not reboot on its own, wait at least 10 minutes before manually restarting the computer to make sure that you do not interrupt BIOS recovery.

Eject the disc or remove the USB drive before rebooting to prevent accidentally reloading the recovery program.

Reboot the computer and watch to make sure the Phoenix BIOS screen appears as normal. Once the BIOS loads properly, your operating system should launch as normal.


http://www.theeldergeek.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=21209

http://www.rechner.org/b1800.html

Jan 05, 2014 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Bios passwords


Locate Phoenix BIOS Passwords

The basic input/output system, or BIOS, is a program that acts as a digital liaison, managing communications between peripherals and the operating system.

Because the BIOS is critical to the operation of a PC, some computer manufacturers and workplaces employ a password for security.

If the password is lost or has been reset through electrostatic discharge, it would be impossible to guess without the aid of computer forensics.

Sometimes you can gain access to the BIOS through the keyboard, depending on the computer, but typically the solution is mechanical.

Contact your computer manufacturer.
All computer manufacturers have websites with technical support available.
1
Have your computer model number and serial number ready.
If the manufacturer is unable to help locate a password, standard back-door passwords may help.

2

So-called back-door passwords may help you access the BIOS. Try using the following back-door passwords to access the BIOS: phoenix, PHOENIX, CMOS, BIOS. BIOS passwords are case sensitive.

3 Contact the motherboard's manufacturer if the back-door passwords failed.
Find the motherboard's website for technical support.
You will need to open the computer case if you do not know the motherboard brand.
4
Electrostatic discharge can reset a BIOS password.
Shutdown and unplug the computer.
Unplug the monitor and all peripherals from the PC, including speakers and USB devices.

Ground yourself by wearing an antistatic wristband clipped to the metal case, or touch something metal before you open the case.
Use the screwdriver to loosen and remove the screws from the case. Look for the motherboard, the largest circuit board inside, attached to one side of the case.
5

Printing on a motherboard can be hard to see without a magnifying glass. Examine the motherboard for a brand name.

A good place to start searching is near the processor, the large square box on the motherboard. A flashlight and magnifying glass are especially useful for a clear view of the motherboard.
The brand name could be printed anywhere or, sometimes, not at all.
6
The motherboard battery is round and fairly flat. Locate the CMOS battery while you have the case open.

If contacting the motherboard manufacturer failed, you will have to remove the battery.
The battery is circular, about the size of a dime, but as thick as two to three stacked dimes.

Do not disconnect or remove anything yet. Removing the CMOS Battery

7
Note the location of any cables that need to be disconnected. Use the digital camera to take pictures of the motherboard, or sketch the location of cables and connectors.
f any components or cables need to be moved or unplugged to reach the battery, you want to remember their exact location.
8
Leave the battery out for at least 20 minutes. Remove the CMOS battery carefully so as not to snap or break the clamps.
Leave the battery out for 20 to 25 minutes to allow the capacitors to completely discharge any memory. Avoid touching anything else in the computer.
9
Tighten the case screws when done. Return the battery to the motherboard, and reconnect any cables that were disconnected in the case. Close the computer case and tighten the screws.
10
Look for the setup message on the monitor. Turn on the computer and closely watch the monitor for the "Entering Setup" message that appears before Windows starts.

The message will tell you which key to press to enter the BIOS setup.
You may need to reboot a few times to see the message, as it appears on the screen for just a few seconds.
11
Carefully read the settings information on the monitor. Follow the directions on the monitor for changing the date, boot sequence, and any other settings.

Work slowly and read the screen directions thoroughly.
Be alert and cautious.

Once the settings are saved, the system will start, and the password will have been removed.
http://www.computerhope.com/help/phoenix.htm
Phoenix BIOS help and simulation


Reset a Phoenix BIOS Password


The Phoenix BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) is a simple program that resides on the CMOS ROM (Read Only Memory) chip on a computer system's motherboard.

There are a couple of major BIOS manufacturers, including Phoenix. Each BIOS contains a set of initial parameters that can be set using a simple text interface.

A security feature is built into the program that allows the computer user to set a password for the BIOS.

When activated, the computer will not complete the booting up process until the password is entered. If the password is unknown, then it must be reset in order to gain access to the computer.
WARNING: Before you start troubleshooting remember that you are dealing with electricity that can KILL.
http://www.kitchentablecomputers.com/static.php - rules

·
Turn off the computer and unplug all cables from the back of the case, labeling each one if it isn't color coded. This must include the power cable, which should also be unplugged from the wall or power strip.
·2

Open the computer case by removing the screws on the back that hold the side panel on the frame.
Some systems will use thumb screws and no tools will be required.
However, most computer systems will require the use of a Phillips head screwdriver.
·3

Locate the CMOS battery.
It will be located near the CMOS chip and looks like a large watch battery (see the link below).
http://www.dewassoc.com/support/bios/bios_password.htm

Check to see if there is a three-pin jumper switch near the CMOS battery as well.

It is only present on some motherboards and will be used in step 4 if it is there.
·4

Remove the CMOS battery.
Leave the battery out for 30 minutes to allow any residual electricity in the CMOS ROM to discharge.

This will effectively reset all settings in the CMOS to default values and clear the password.

If the three-pin jumper is present, leave the CMOS battery in place.
Move the jumper on the pins from the side it is on to the opposite pins.

Then attach the power cord and reboot the system.

It will not boot up but actually clear the CMOS settings.

Remove the power cord and move the jumper back to its original pins. ·5

Re-attach the computer system cover and replace the screws holding it in place.


Re-attach all of the cables to the back of the computer and reboot.
Your Phoenix BIOS password is now reset and you will be able to boot into your operating system.

You may need to re-enter the CMOS settings if it doesn't recognize all of your components such as expanded memory or DVD drives, etc.

Dec 29, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My pentium IV computer ''writes media cable


your cd / dvd player doesnt work, perhaps open the computer and look if all cables seems to be in place.

Mar 23, 2012 | NEC Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Beep from the system unit


1) Please make sure that the HDD IDE cable is plugged in properly on both ends. It is a 40 pin female cord which should be seated on IDE channel 1 on the motherboard.
2) Make sure that all the CD/DVD drives are on IDE 2 or on SATA
3) Make sure taht the Jumper setting on the back of the HDD is set to MASTER
4) Login to bios and make see if you can find the HDD from the IDE drives menu. I am sure you will. From Boot menu select the NATIVE mode that will activate both the SATA and the IDE channels. Select HDD as second boot device.

Feb 01, 2012 | Intel Pentium 3 , 450 MHz Pentium III...

1 Answer

My pc400 will not detect hard drive while in clean window install mode. All primary and secondary are set to auto detect. Boot sequence set to cd while installing from cd rom


Hello,
You can change the pata cable ,if you have a spare.or fit the cable again.

Follow the link.set for boot priority.
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/articles/bios/

Phoenix BIOS setup and help
BIOS - The setup program used in desktop and laptop computers/PCs - Page 1 of 2

Or you can setup bios "load fail save default"na d pers F10>hit

Hope this helps.
There is an rate option "Was this helpful?" Yes or No.
If you are helped you can rate ,that is your choice.

Jan 17, 2011 | Intel PENTIUM-4 865GV CHIP MOTHER BOARD...

1 Answer

I formatted my secondary Hard drive and now it disappeared from "My Computer" and from "Disk -Management" . -But it still shows in the "Bios" and "Device Management" . I don't have access to it, what...


replace all the leads that attach to your hard drive including electrical extensions + IDE,SATA and the ones that attach from your motherboard to hard drive
hope this helps

Sep 20, 2010 | Western Digital Caviar WD600JB Special...

2 Answers

In need of a pci/pnp 586 manual. anyone got?


BIOS INFORMATION :
BIOS MANUFACTURER : PHOENIX BIOS V.4.05 R 1.0 - (C) 1985/1995
BIOS ID : UNKNOWN
BIOS DATE : 11/23/95
BIOS ROM SIZE : UNKNOWN
CHIPSET : ALi M1511 REV.4
SUPER I/O CHIP : SMC 665GT REV.2 FOUND AT PORT 3FOH

CASE LABEL :
COMPUDYNE - PENTIUM PROCESSOR
P/N: 91.AA884.003
S/N: 1900001233

INSIDE THE CASE :
3 ISA SLOTS
3 PCI SLOTS
4 EDO MEMORY SLOTS
1 ALi CHISET - M1513 A1 - 9542 TS2 - AC7129SB
1 ALi CHISET - M1511 A1 - 9538 TS5 - B40958SB
2 ALi CHISET - M1512 A1 - 9537 TS2 - B40954SA
SOUND ONBOARD - CRYSTAL - CS4232 KQ EP - 33 PIN CN11 WAVE TABLE - 07 PIN CN12 AUDIO MIDI
PHOENIX MULTIKEY - PHOENIX 1987-1993 ER129
PHOENIX MB - 586 PCI PNP - PHOENIX TECNOLOGIES - A448416
INTEL PENTIUM PROCESSOR 133

NUMBERS IN WHITE INK ON THE BOARD TOP SURFACE :
95115-1
V50S MB
and
48.57001.011
MADE IN TAIWAN R.O.C.

Aug 29, 2009 | Intel Motherboard

2 Answers

I need a bios upgrade. I have a PT800DBP Motherboard Motherboard: CPU Type Intel Pentium 4A, 2833 MHz (7 x 405) Motherboard Name Unknown Motherboard Chipset VIA VT8763 Apollo PT800 System Memory 512 MB...


boot the pc from cold, note the long identifier number - it contains a 2 character identifier for the board manufacturer. For more info go to the Award bios website, it has a better explanation of this. From there you will be able to either download new BIOS from there, or the website of the vendor/manufacturer.

May 02, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Adding ide drive to a sata boot p4p800x xp Problem - ASUS P4P800-X Pentium Motherboard the system would not find ANY boot device


GaRoMo, 2 things. One change the pin on the IDE to a slave. Two open your bios. Asus board press the delete key every two sceonds untill the bios main menu opends. Go to BOOT section & make sure you have the SATA drive to boot. Your IDE should not be listed. Thats it.

Mike

Apr 25, 2008 | ASUS P4P800-X Pentium Motherboard

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