Question about Asrock 775i65G Motherboard

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Power supply aux power connection burned out

I have a 775i65g motherboard, and the 4 pin aux plug on the power supply that connection to the motherboard get hot and melts, it may take a day or a few hours before it does that, this has happened with three power supplies, can you help me solve this problem, or should I buy a new motherboard?

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If this happened on three supplies, the trouble has to be in the motherboard connector. Probably one of the pins is corroded or very loose and causing a poor connection. The resulting heat is melting those connectors. You would be best off replacing the board since you don't know if other problems may be waiting to occur. A replacement would probably cost around $50 to $60.

Posted on Feb 20, 2009

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Is not Reading My Geforce GTX 260 Card


What do you mean connect wire to graphics card?

A) Computer is to be OFF when connecting a monitor cable.

B) Computer is to be OFF, and unplugged from power; when plugging the power cable from Power Supply, into it.

You are also supposed to be Following Anti-Static Precautions.

What Power Supply are you using?
Manufacturer name, and model number. Post back in a Comment.

Motherboard requires about 150 Watts by itself.

That isn't including what the Processor (CPU) needs, Ram Memory needs, optical drive/s need, computer case fans need; AND what the Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 graphics card needs.

It needs 225 Watts by itself.

(Manufacturers usually state around 500 Watts MINIMUM.
This is in reality based on a COMPLETE computer system, and NOT just the graphics card itself)

What do I base that the GTX 260 needs 225 Watts?
(I see that as the -> Maximum, though )

A PCI Express x16 expansion slot on a motherboard, is only capable of 75 Watts of power.
That is why the additional power cables were brought out.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable that plugs into the GTX 260, is capable of an additional 75 Watts of power.

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 260 requires using TWO 6-pin PCI Express power cables

That means 150 Watts of additional power.
75 Watts + 150 Watts = 225 Watts

http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-260/specifications

"Supplementary Power Connectors -> 6-pin x2"

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

If you are using just one 6-pin PCI Express power cable, '
this = NO.

NOT enough power for the graphics card.

What will happen?

A) The PCI Express x16 slot connector oins, will burn
B) The gold plated contact pins on the bottom of the graphics card, will burn.
C) The connector on the graphics card, that the 6-pin PCI Express power cable plugs into, will burn.
D) The connector on the 6-pin PCI Express power cable will burn.

The graphics card will burn up.
Too little power.

IF, your Power Supply has enough power, and IF there are two 4-pin Peripheral power cables that aren't being used; you can use a 6-pin PCI Express power adapter cable.

Example of 4-pin Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Example of 6-pin PCI Express power adapter cable, was shown in the Playtool link,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

http://www.directron.com/pci03.html

(Connectors are white, and hard to see against white backdrop. You can enlarge all 3 views)

For additional questions please post in a Comment
Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 23, 2013 | Gigabyte GA-M61PME-S2 Motherboard, AM2,...

1 Answer

M3A770DE 4 pin


Due to the 'large expanse' of information you posted I can barely contain myself.

1) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, that plugs into the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

Note that this power cable has TWO Yellow 12 Volt wires.

Back in the day there was no additional power cable needed, for the motherboard.
When the Intel Pentium 4 came out, the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable came out also.

Power for the Processor.

More, and more powerful hardware components for the motherboard, (Processor and graphics card), required more power to the motherboard.

The 6-pin PCI Express power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

This power cable was used to connect directly to a graphics card, and provide power to it.

Note that this power cable has THREE Yellow 12 Volt wires.
It can carry up to 75 Watts of power.

Still wasn't enough power TO the motherboard, and TO the graphics card, with the new hardware component technology being brought out.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

Note that this power cable has FOUR Yellow 12 Volt wires.
Is capable of providing up to 150 Watts.

A PCI Express x16 slot is capable of providing 75 Watts.

Note the shape of the sockets in the connector.
Now compare to an 8-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

DO NOT confuse the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, with the 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
They are NOT the same.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector on the motherboard, is at the top left corner of the Processor socket, and close to the outside edge of the motherboard.

(With motherboard installed in computer case)

You can use the motherboard with just a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

Look at the LOCK on the side of the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable's connector.

With that Lock AWAY from you, or on the opposite side of the connector, a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in on the RIGHT side.

If you have a powerful graphics card installed in your
PCI Express x16 -> slot/S, you had definitely better use a Power Supply that has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

This is a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Misnomered as a 'Molex' power cable.
{ Molex was the first to design and produce this style of power cable CONNECTOR. The name stuck. Kind of like calling an open-end wrench a Crescent wrench }

IF you use an adapter power cable; Use TWO 4-pin standard Peripheral power cables!!
You need those Yellow 12 Volt wires.

What will happen if you do not use two?

1) The PCI Express x16 slot/s will burn.

2) The gold plated contact pins on the PCI Express graphics card, or cards, will burn.

3) If the graphics card, or graphics cards, require a power cable connected to them;
A) The connections on the graphics card for the power cable will burn.

B) The power cable connector will burn.

Other than that the only other 4-pin references on the motherboard, that I can see, is the optical drive's 4-pin audio cable connector on the motherboard, (CD1), and the CPU (Processor) Fan 4-pin connector on the motherboard.

For additional questions, or if the above is not what you seek, post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 08, 2012 | Asrock M3A770DE ATX AM3 AMD770 DDR3...

2 Answers

I have tried running 2 different M4A79 deluxe motherboards with a corsair 650W power supply, phenom I X4 processor, and an nVidia 9800GT video card but neither of them will so much as turn on with...


It sounds like the ATX power supply is not getting turned on by the motherboard.
In order for this to happen, pin 14 (PS_ON*) of the 20-pin ATX power plug from the power supply must be pulled to ground. You can test this by plugging the power supply in to AC power without it plugged in to the motherboard.

Using a paper clip, short pin 14 (PS_ON*) to pin 15 (ground) and the power supply should turn ON.

Looking at the front of the 20-pin plug, with the latch on the top, pin 14 is the 4th from the left
__
_________________' '________________
' 11 ' 12 ' 13 ' 14 ' 15 ' 16 ' 17 ' 18 ' 19 ' 20 '
'--------------------------------------------------------------'
' 1 ' 2 ' 3 ' 4 ' 5 ' 6 ' 7 ' 8 ' 9 ' 10 '
---------------------------------------------------------------
Front of 20-pin ATX Power Connector

If you can turn on the power supply by shorting pin 14 to ground, but it doesn't happen when plugged into the motherboard, there is most likely a jumper setting on the motherboard which has not been configured correctly.

I hope this helps!

Mar 13, 2011 | ASUS M4A79 Deluxe Motherboard

2 Answers

I've got a new Gigabyte Ga-M68Mt-D3 mobo paired with a cooler master 460 watt power supple. Cpu is Amd phenom II 3.2 ghz with 4 gig of DDR3 ram. I powered up the supply attached to my ATX power supply...


Most motherboards now have a 24-pin power supply connector. If you haven't already found a diagram showing the pinouts of the 20- and 24-pin power plugs, here's one borrowed from a handy site:

pgh_pa_guy_1.jpg

The two plugs are essentially the same, but the 24-pin version duplicates some voltages on the extra pins. The extra pins in the larger connector were meant to provide extra current paths for voltages that see heavy loads from newer processors and motherboard circuitry. Depending on how a motherboard is designed, it might work with a 20-pin plug connected (leaving pins 11, 12, 23 and 24 empty). But typically if the board has a 24-pin connector it needs the 24-pin power supply plug.

Most power supplies have a 20-pin plug with a separate 4-pin section that fastens to it for connection to a 24-pin mobo connector. It typically has one side designed to slide onto the end of the 20-pin plug, essentially turning it into the 24-pin version. This added plug does not have a retaining clamp on its side, so you can tell it from the the 4-pin CPU power plug. The wire colors are also different. For reference, here is the processor power plug, from the same website:

pgh_pa_guy_2.jpg
New motherboard specs call for the separate processor power connector for the same reason the extra pins were added to the power supply connector: to handle the high currents needed by increasingly faster CPUs.

When the motherboard has these connectors, you need to use them all to get everything working. Hope this helps. Thanks to smspowersupply.com for the diagrams, and thank you for using Fixya.

moz-screenshot-1.png

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1 Answer

CPU overvolted and burn using 8pin eps12v cable on crosshair


no i dnt think so some time due to manufacturing defects this happens the new one wont burn unless and untill u over volt it.

Jan 31, 2010 | ASUS CROSSHAIR Motherboard

1 Answer

My DFI 848P-AL 12V 4 port power connector burn


you can find that in a non working power supply, cut the damage terminal and replace that from non working. be sure for the color code of wires to be replace.

Feb 09, 2009 | DFI 848P-AL Motherboard

1 Answer

Two sets of power leads to motherboard from pwr pk, 1 x 20 pin and a 4 pin, when the 4 pin isn't attached to the 8s651mp-rz motherboard the fans spin, the mother board light comes on, but then does...


The 4 pin connector is required as it provides the power for the CPU to run. if nothing is happening with the 4 pin connector plugged in then there is a problem. You need to make sure that you Power Supply can supply enough power for what you are connecting to it (400W would be the bare minimum with no high end video card, 500W would be recommended). You also need to make sure that the Power Supply is connected properly because some Power Supplies from pre-built systems from companies like Dell are wired differently than the standard power supplies. The only other likely problem is that there is a short on the motherboard either from the mounting of the motherboard in the case or from something on the motherboard being bad. Make sure there is no metal touching the motherboard except at the holes used for mounting.

Jan 02, 2009 | Gigabyte 8S651MP-RZ (GA-8S651MP-RZ)...

1 Answer

ATX Power Supply Question


Most new power supplies have a twenty pin Molex connector and a 4 pin Molex connector. If you look closely at the connectors you will see that they go together a certain way. It can be very hard to tell. Take a close look at the shapes of each terminal. Match them up exactly.

Nov 28, 2008 | Gateway Motherboards

1 Answer

Wont power up ecs motherboard


Your 4-pin power connector supplies voltage to your CPU through some series of MOSFET transistors. First try to disconnect your CPU from the socket and power up your motherboard. Your CPU might be toasted. MOSFET transistors might be bad. Also look at your big caps around the CPU. If they have bubbled tops, you need to replace them.

Good luck
NetSalem

Jul 17, 2008 | Intel Motherboard

2 Answers

Abit IP95 Mobo fails to power up.


Ok, try connecting just one thing at a time - start of with just your board and the power supply... still smell burning? There's probably an issue with the power supply - no fans & leds would indicate this too (can you hear anything when you power up?)

What cooling have you been using - weird quetion, but is there any chance there could be moisture on the board? (either from water cooling or from condensation in the room)

Feb 09, 2008 | Ziotek ATX Motherboard Standoff, 12 Pk...

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