Question about Goodman CLQ36AR49 Air Conditioner

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Missing insulaton on the suction line.

With insulation missing on the suction line could liquid refrigerant get back to the compressor and cause damage?

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You would not get liquid refrigerant back to the compressor because of missing insulation. Please let me know if you need any further assistance.

Posted on Feb 19, 2009

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A copper thin tube from the unit is very hot. Is it normal?


Yes, well somewhat normal. The refrigerant leaves the compressor at high temperature and flows through the condenser coil where it cools about 20 degrees warmer than the outside air flowing through the condenser. Many small air conditioner units use a small copper tube (capillary tube) of a specific diameter and length for that system to cause a decrease in refrigerant pressure between the condenser and the evaporator. The refrigerant leaves the compressor as a gas at high pressure, cools in the condenser and changes into a liquid. The liquid flows through the cap tube and cools more as the pressure decreases and gets closer to the evaporator. The refrigerant boils and evaporates under the low pressure of the evaporator and turns back into a gas. That gas is pulled back to the compressor.
If the condenser is not cooling the refrigerant enough, the tube can become extra hot. Efficiency is reduced. Actual temperatures throughout the system depend on the type refrigerant used, suction and discharge pressure at the compressor, outside and inside temperature. Tables, charts and graphs for various pressure-temperature relationships can be found in refrigeration books and chemical web sites.

Mar 17, 2015 | Carrier FB4ANF060 HVAC Electric Unit & AC...

1 Answer

Conair mini split heat pump isn't cooling but has cold suction line but warm liquid line and is not freezing up the evaporator. Thinking a sucking reversing valve?? What could cause that? Both evapor


Make sure that your refrigerant charge is good first. Reversing valve has 4 pipes coming off of it. The one alone is discharge and centre of 3 is suction always. The two sides are the reversing pipes. One side should be same temp as discharge and other same temp (+-5F) as suction. If not then you have bypassing refrigerant in valve. Bad.

Jul 13, 2013 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

All the coils on the unit outside froze up


Hello, if the inside fan was not running then the evaporator coil cannot absorb enough heat to vaporize the refrigerant, and the suction line will freeze including the compressor. Liquid refrigerat instead of vapor passes thru the suction line into the compressor. Lack of airflow or a low refrigerant charge is what will cause the line to freeze. In your case it was no airflow

Jun 14, 2012 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

The air conditioner comes on but the motor fan dose not turn. I did rap new insulation around the copper pipe including the small pipe. I have just remove the small pipe from the insulation and now...


Hello, the smaller pipe is your liquid line, this line should never be insulated. The bigger pipe is your suction line and it should always be insulated to prevent condensation and so the refrigerant does not absorb too much heat going to the compressor. However, that should not affect the fan not coming on. It sounds like maybe a wire came loose somwhere going into the ac as you were wrapping the insulation.

May 08, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My whirlpool acq128xp0 runs great one day, then barely starts the second day, It doesnt have the air volume or cooling it use too. Just started this year. Mike


Mike, when you stated it barely starts, to what are you referring? The compressor (condenser) section has an issue when starting or the indoor fan is hard to start?

If the fan does run, and the condenser unit outside is operating and you are getting lower than usual air flow (compared to previously), you may have a dirty filter, or you may have other obstructions at the evap coil inside the furnace or air handler. It could also be the unit is freezing up and ice on the evap coil is cutting down the air flow. Chances are if the coil is freezing over, you will have two issue that cause this:

Air flow issues (dirty coil, clogged air filter, or other obstructions across the evap coil, such as a plastic bag or pet hair, dust, ect.) which will also cause the coil to freeze over.

The other issue that would cause the low air flow is ice that is a result of low refrigerant.

If the system ran fine in the past, I will rule out it may be inproperly sized. Have you recently had a fan motor replaced on the indoor unit. If so, and they under sized the fan motor, then it could be the fan is not drawing, or blowing enough air across the evaporator coil and this will cause it to freeze over.

Look for ice on the suction line (piping) which is the bigger of the two lines coming from the outside unit (condensing unit). It is also the line that has the insulation covering it. If it has ice on it, then freezing is occuring on the evaporator. If so, then airflow issues, or refrigerant levels are usually the main culprits.

The two lines (suction and liquid) running between your indoor and outdoor unit should feel the following way to the touch of your hand:

Suction should be cold and possibly sweating if exposed (in places where no insulation is present).

Liquid line (smaller line) should be warm to the touch, but not too hot, or too cool. Should feel close to the outside ambient temperature if felt by hand.

Look these issues over and let me know.

Scott

Sep 04, 2010 | Whirlpool Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Have a model 38TRA018330 condenser keep losing compressors. Run is 223ft with 1/2 suction line and 1/2 liquid line. Can you help? I know the compressor is only rated at 200ft and i can shorten the run will...


Too long of a lineset for sure. You can put a suction line trap in and add 1.5 ounces more oil to new compressor. This should keep compressor better lubricated.

Mar 29, 2010 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

When i was fixed a problem in central ac trane i found decreased in freon r22 and the suctione line was freezed, i charged the ac with froen gas r 22 then i found that the suctione line changed and begin...


You are still low on freon. Charging AC by superheat and subcool
First charging a unit by superheat, this is only for Acs with an orifice or capillary tube.
Optimum superheat is 12° to 15° at the compressor or suction line outside the unit.
Hook up your gages and put a thermometer on suction line (large line), start the AC. Measure the temperature of the suction line and read the pressure on your gages. Theres a temperature scale on your gages for R-22 or R-410A the needle will show you the pressure on the outer scale and if you follow it down to the R-22 or R-410a inner scale that is the saturation temperature for that refrigerant, (you can also use a temperature pressure chart), now read the thermometer, let’s say the suction temperature( the thermometer) is 67° and the saturation temperature (the gages or temp. press. Chart), is 55°, subtract the saturation temperature from the suction temperature, 67°- 55° = 12° superheat.
Charging by Subcooling, this is for Acs with a thermostatic expansion valve, it’s common to see a sight glass on the liquid line (on these units with a sight glass just clear it, when, indoor room is at approximate set point of the thermostat). Optimum sub cooling is 12° to 15° at the outdoor unit.
Hook up your gages and put a thermometer on liquid line (small line), start the AC. Measure the temperature of the liquid line and read the pressure on your gages. Theres a temperature scale on your gages for R-22 or R-410A the needle will show you the pressure on the outer scale and if you follow it down to the R-22 or R-410a inner scale that is the saturation temperature for that refrigerant,(you can also use a temperature pressure chart), now read the thermometer, let’s say the liquid temperature( the thermometer) is 100° and the saturation temperature (the gages or temp. press. Chart), is 114°, subtract the liquid temperature from the saturation temperature, 114°- 100° = 14° subcool.

Oct 05, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Split Air Conditioning problem


are you sure it is the liquid line and not the suction line? The small line or the big line. should not have frost on the small line or liquid line. Frost normal on the insulated big line.

Aug 09, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Model GSC130481AG, S# 0808548576 The common wire to the compressor rubbed through the wire insulation and melted a hole in the discharge line from the compressor. Upon loosing all of the refrigerant the...


You have a restriction in the system. Probably in the TXV or orifice in the A/H.
The burn out sent trash/fragments through the system. I would open the sytem and blow nitrogen through, then pull a deep vacuum.
You may need to install a low side filter/drier. When you open the system change out the high side drier again for sure.

Jun 26, 2009 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

3 Compressor in 6 years. Is this normal? As a consummer iam left with no warranty and support...


Multi-Compressor Failures
1st time a compressor fails the service tech is suppose to determine the cause of the
Failure and fix it. Is it no oil return or oil being washed out of compressor do to low sump superheat,
liquid slugging do to thermostatic expansion valve or orifice flooding compressor,starving
for refrigerant do to thermostatic expansion valve or orifice not supplying enough refrigerant to keep the compressor cool, or is the reversing valve shifting properly or electrical,such as bad defrost board, capacitor,relay or electric component or connection, etc.
With multi-compressor failures until you determine the cause and fix it you will keep having this problem
And when a heat pump compressor fails if it’s a burn out, such as electric short or long running at high temperatures and pressures or low on refrigerant level not enough cooling back to the compressor, Causing the refrigerant to break down and create an acid. You need to check the oil in the bad compressor to see if there’s acid in it, then replace the compressor, reversing valve, accumulator (the oil and contaminents will accumulate here and you can‘t get it out), thermostatic expansion valve or orifice, liquid drier, suction line filter drier (if it’s on the lineset outside of the unit then you need to put it inside the unit as close to the compressor as possible).
And after running the system for a couple of days, then the liquid drier and suction filter should be replaced again, depending on how bad the burnt out was or if there‘s acid still in the system you might need to replace them again.
It’s hard to say who would be responsible but there’s something other than the compressor causing the problem and you need to find out what it is.

Apr 20, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

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