Question about Dive Rite Brass Pressure Gauge - Gauges - Gauges - Analog - Diving Ge

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My diving gauge is stuck at 50 Bar even when I disconnect it from the air tank. When I reconnect it to the air tank the gauge stays at 50 bar yet I know I have 230 bar in the tank. Any ideas why?

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Need new gauge,

Posted on Feb 19, 2009

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During the last 2 dives after dropping below 12 or 11 hundred pound of pressure in the tank at 45 to 60 ft in depth my computer will start blinking all numbers and will register 5000 or 4600 lbs of...


Hi Mike, never heard of that specific problem, maybe the pressure sensor is faulty. I would strongly recommend that you do not dive with this computer set up until you get it serviced/repaired as it may not be recording data correctly and will not be calculating your correct nitrogen build up.

Oct 17, 2010 | Oceanic Datamax Pro Plus 2 Battery Kit -...

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The Rapid Diver System



Lightweight Scuba System Goes From Tactical to Practical

RAPID DIVER™ is a lightweight, all-inclusive scuba system that mates a tank, regulator and buoyancy module to a uniform-fit, load-bearing harness. It was created in response to public safety and military needs for a universal fit, compact, versatile and easily deployed scuba system.

Mission requirements called for a system that is universal fit, could be stored in a small space, donned and activated quickly, and worn in situations such as helicopter and boat operations in which conventional scuba gear would prove too cumbersome and restrictive. Comfort was also of great importance, as some operations would require the user to wear the gear for extended periods of time while engaged in complex, task-loaded missions. With an overall weight of just 25 pounds, the Rapid Diver stores in a compact hand-carried pouch, and readies for use in less than a minute. It provides sufficient air duration for the average dive a 20 to 25 minutes at moderate depths. The Rapid Diver can go from duffel to dive in 15 seconds.

Though designed for professional use, many of the Rapid Diver's performance characteristics make it equally suited to a range of civilian applications. It is the preferred system for shore diving, due to its user-friendly design, universal fit capability and ease of transporting and storage. Persons who are unable to wear heavy conventional scuba gear, or who simply feel uncomfortable with the associated bulk and weight, appreciate the light overall weight and wearer comfort of Rapid Diver. In addition to a low overall weight, the Rapid Diver features a unique load-bearing harness that distributes the weight of the tank evenly over the diver's torso, making it well suited for difficult shore entries and is also beneficial for long walks to the water or water entry from ladders or small boats. Rapid Diver's small size allows it to be stowed aboard a boat, where it can be deployed for underwater boat maintenance, anchor checks, and fast response to emergencies such as a fouled prop or suspected hull damage.


Also unique to the Rapid Diver system is the ability to configure the rig for a wide variety of mission profiles. In it's simplest form, the Rapid Diver can be configured to become a PFD by removing the tank and life support system, beneficial in most boat operations (Tactical Swimmers Vest TSV). For extended dive profiles, the Rapid Diver can be configured with standard sized tanks (80 cu ft) mounted on the innovative back pad. If mission requirements call for an even longer diving profile, the Rapid Diver can be used in conjunction with surface supplied air or in a traditional side mount configuration. Other custom-configurable gas management options allow the user to configure the rig with a redundant air supply, and to use full-face scuba masks in conjunction with a gas switching block. To extend duration and stealth, a rebreather module which clips onto the existing Rapid Diver Tactical is in the works and will be made available for military applications.

Rapid Diver is a premium product and was created by dive equipment developer and long time diver, Christopher De Felice. The Rapid Diver is manufactured in the United States, constructed using materials selected for extreme durability and wear resistance.

For the latest information about the Rapid Diver system come and join us at the Official Rapid Diver Forum:
rapiddiver.board-directory.com
www.RapidDiver.com

on Jul 08, 2009 | Zeagle Rapid Diver System - Buoyancy...

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I have an oceanic console with compass,computer , and air pressure. Now I am getting air leaking out by the compass hole. Can the pressure seal be replaced? Thanks for any help. Donald


It's probably the pressure gauge.. before you replace it, put it in some water to see where the leak is actually coming from. If it's coming from inside the gauge housing, it's time to replace it. If it's from where the hose is connected, there's a little spindle inside the connector between the gauge and the high pressure hose. Those frequently get corroded and start leaking. It's a cheap little metal tube with an O-ring on each end - those get brittle, crack and leak... the spindle is a cheap part at your local dive shop.

Apr 27, 2009 | Oceanic "Veo 100" Dive Computer Triple...

1 Answer

Airbubbles in Mares compass


It is Completely normal... i have had 8 computers (all by Mares, or Aries) and all Dive compasses that i have seen have had a bubble.

Apr 20, 2009 | mares Nemo Air Compass Assembly -...

2 Answers

Empty air pressure gauge


mineral oil any thing else will build up residue

Mar 18, 2009 | Dive Rite Brass Pressure Gauge - Gauges -...

3 Answers

Why do scuba diving pressure gauges reach 5000 psi if a tank may only be filled to a max of around 3200?


Scuba tanks can be filled well past 3200psi. When they do a hydrostatic test it is well beyond any pressure that any dive shop will fill a tank to. The highest I've seen the pressure get in my tank is 4000 and that is when the filler at the dive shop forgot about it.

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Scuba Gauges what do I need them for?


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity and length of decompression stops and to calculate residual nitrogen for repetitive dives. The time of a dive is easily tracked using a scuba diving watch and the depth is tracked using a depth gauge. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

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