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NOISE IN PIPES-HOT WATER HEAT

ALL OF A SUDDEN OUR OIL FUNACE HEATING SYSTEM IS MAKING A LOT OF GURLING NOISES THRU THE PIPES IN THE WALLS AND UNDER THE FLOOR--IS THIS AIR TRAPPED IN THE SYSTEM-AND IF SO HOW DO I GET IT OUT

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You have to bleed the system

Posted on Feb 15, 2009


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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Glow worm 45-60 standing boiler making banging noises when in operation


The noise you refer to is called Kettling, it is caused by the hot water in your boiler not being able to leave the boiler quick enough, if the problem developed quickly and your system is a "fully pumped " system this would generally point to your pump either has failed or is on its way out, i.e . your radiators would not heat up as the hot water is stuck in the boiler hence the banging......( if you know where the pump is you can generally feel if it is running by a small vibration ) if you have gravity hot water and pumped heating circuit then I would assume that it is noisy when just doing HW, and the banging is a problem that has gradually got worse it can indicate that the boiler is scaling up (are you in a hard water area). if this is correct there are various additives that can be put in the system to help quieten it down, I suggest you really need a heating engineer to diagnose fully.

Feb 07, 2014 | Water Heaters

Tip

Hot Water Steam Efficiency Plus Comfort


Steam heat is a great warm, wonderful, and absolutely fabulous way to heat your house. Steam heat is almost always created from water in a boiler fueled by gas, oil or electricity. It then passes through pipes and radiators or convectors to heat your home. A steam heating system uses steam that is generated from a boiler. When the water boils, the steam rises through the pipes and into the radiators to heat them. The hot radiators then heat your home.

Steam is a great heat distribution medium because it moves easily through your system and it has an extremely high heat-holding capacity. The heat-holding capacity of steam is much greater than that of water. Steam heating systems often operate at very low pressures and usually under 220°F. Steam heat is usually distributed by either one or two pipe systems. In a case of a one-pipe steam heating system, a single main serves the dual purpose of supplying steam to the heat exchanger and allowing condensate to run back from the radiators also. A two-pipe system has two connections from each heat exchanger or radiator. In this system, steam and condensate flow in separate piping from each other. With a steam system all pipes must be well insulated and you must use pipe insulation rated for steam piping. If the insulation is removed the system will no longer work as designed. Noise and all sorts of problems will come from uninsulated piping.

When you have radiators on upper floors or radiators that are further from the boiler they should be adjusted to release more air to compensate for the increased air volume in the piping due to the distance from the boiler. If you have a valve that is clogged with mineral deposits or stuck shut, no air will be able to get out of the piping. Because of this no steam can enter the radiator, so it doesn't heat up. This will block the movement of steam into the radiator, or cause a very noisy hammering as pressurized steam tries to get through this water "dam".

Steam radiators need to have a valve that allows air to escape at a controlled rate so that the radiator can heat up. Steam heating systems will also lose a little bit of water all the time, so there has to be water makeup so that you do not run your boiler dry. Steam heating systems without an automatic water feeder are not safe. You will risk serious boiler damage should boiler water be lost. If the boiler runs dry it could also explode if water is placed into it while it is hot. There should always be a low water cutoff installed on every steam system. Therefore on a steam boiler the automatic water feeder serves as a safety device also.

It is very important that you find someone that is very familiar with steam heating systems when repairing or installing steam heating. Incorrectly designed, installed, steam systems and condensate piping is a huge problem in today's buildings and facilities. There are not many qualified to design and install properly operating steam heating systems. Incorrect steam piping will always cause costly premature failure of steam equipment such as steam coils, heat exchangers, and control valves. Not to mention the higher cost of operating a system that is not working efficiently.
http://www.fixya.com/support/r3904286-steam_system_steam_radiator_air

http://www.fixya.com/support/r4008078-differences_between_steam_hot_water

on Dec 29, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I have a lot of noise coming from the pipes i have bleed the air valves from the registers and still have the noise


you can not bleed air from a air con system like you can a radiator in your home its against the law the system will need to have the gas removed checked for leaks put on a vacum then recharged bleeding will not work

Jan 21, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My computer is becoming really hot and noisy. After turning on the computer, everything is good (no noise). Once around 15 minutes passes by or I open up a lot of programs together, my computer starts...


Sounds like the fan is wearing out, as it heats up the fan needs to spin faster and if the bearings are wearing out it will start getting louder and it will also get hotter because the fan cannot keep up the heat being produced. You can replace the fan, most computer shops will carry replacements, also get a can of compressed air and give the inside of the computer a good cleaning. This will help keep things cooler as well. Also make sure that the air vents on the outside of the case are clear as well.

Jan 07, 2010 | Vantec Fan Vibration Dampener Noise...

1 Answer

4 problems: I am the homes second owner - I


Hi, let me try and help you locate this filter. They put them on the return side of the system. Depending on the size of you're home, you may have up to 3 or more.Normally, they put them in the ceiling to clean the air as it is drawn back to the blower fan motor.Check through out home to see if they are in the ceiling. If not, go to the unit upstairs.If the blower motor is an up flow with motor above, you should be able to see the filter above the motor.If it is a down flow, the filter should be laying below the blower motor.To sum this up, which ever way this motor is blowing the air would be the supply air flow, and the filter will or should be before the air heading out.It should have an arrow showing the direction of the supply air on the blower housing.The return is the air coming back to the heater, where the filter should be located to catch the dirt and start the cycle again.It could have a grill in the wall next to the furnace, or on the face of the furnace it self.Some will be marked on the furnace and will say return filter excess.It could be that the owner before you removed it, and never installed a new one?There will be some way, grill, in furnace for the air to go back to the blower section. Use a good light to look inside.This loud squealing, sounds as though you have a belt drive blower motor that is worn out.They are on split systems, the older ones.That would be the squeal you hear, go to the furnace upstairs, and by removing panels, you will find the belt and more then likely, the filter section.The belt will have a number on it like, 4L330, 4L460, or even A-37 ect.Easy to remove and replace.A direct drive motor has no belt.It also sounds as though this home has a zone control, using hot water that circulates by the use of a water pump in line somewhere in the system so when it calls for heat, this pump starts sending hot water through out different heating zones in this home, more like a commercial system would have.Gas would heat this water, and flow through pipes to VAV boxes in the ceiling, or maybe your supply vents are on the floor, I don't no this. As for the 9 degree difference in the upstairs and down, could be many causes, as the way this heating system is designed, and what type thermostat controls this unit. It will always be warmer upstairs, as you know heat rises, but you can check the way that the duct work has been installed, and see if indeed this is a hot water zone controlled system.You could have dampers in the duct work controlling the amount of air to different parts of the home that may be shut of causing this much of a differential.Take care of the belt, which you can buy at most hardware stores, keep searching for the filter or filters as they are somewhere on the return side, you may hear or feel the air being sucked back to the unit, that is the return side.Find out by looking for a boiler hot water supply if you have a basement, attic and so on.You will be able to solve a lot of these problems by getting familiar with the way this system is set up. I would like to hear back from you on this.Sincerely,
Shastalaker7

Dec 12, 2009 | Fedders Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

We had to replace our hot water tank, we did this


try opening the bleeders on your radiators,one at a time starting at the one closest to the pump until all air has been expelled then close bleeder and move on to the radiator next furthest from the pump and so on.if hot water doesn't come out from the first radiator within a short time, or if you cannot hear air being forced out thru bleeder you prolly have a defective pump; have it checked/replaced by a reputable pro..my guess is that the "buzzing noise" is because the pump is defective and the electricity has no place to go.an easy preliminary check for this is to feel the pump motor while buzzing to see if it is hot, if ti is it prolly is bad

Nov 14, 2009 | Plumbing

1 Answer

Water pipes making noise trying to locate


Good luck! If it is "water hammer" and you already have water hammer arrestors (dead end sections of pipe) the the arrestors MUST be water logged - when you drained the system how long did you leave it open after empty? Sometimes it can take a little while for the arrestors to drain after reaching "empty". The proper solution is to get the arrestors working or add more - not trying to find the noise and dampening or muffling it (the arrestors do more than stop banging!)

May 03, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

4 Answers

Rinnai R53 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters


It sounds like the Rinnai units are working correctly but you've got some plumbing problems.  Any tankless heater has a minimum water flow required to keep the burners going.  If the burners were going with very little water flowing through them to carry the heat away, the heat exchanger could overheat and fail.  The solution is generally to the electronic controls to set the desired temperature and then just use hot water.  Once you start mixing cold water in, you actually reduce the flow of hot water and the burners turn off.  If you are right near the cut off point, the burners will cycle on and off resulting in those very annoying hot-cold-hot-cold showers.  
The fact that you've got those very loud noises indicates some other sort of plumbing problem.  Hooking up two tankless units in series is much more complicated. In heavy draw situations, the second unit is asked to finish heating the water up to temperature when the first unit couldn't quite get it there. Now you're putting hot water into a heater and heating it more.  You have a lot more issues with fluctuating temperatures and pressures within the pipes which could conceivable cause these horrible noises.  Everything's got to be set up right to for things to function properly and it's easy to get something wrong.
From your description, it sounds like a better solution would have been to mount the two heaters in different places. e.g. One in the basement to serve basement and first floor faucets.  The other on the second or third floor to serve those two floors.  Since these units are direct vent (don't use inside air), they can even be mounted in a closed closet as long as the vent can get to the outside.  With this setup you avoid the complexities of a series installation and you also have a much shorter wait time (and therefore less waste) for the fixtures on the upper floors. 

Mar 26, 2008 | Rinnai Desa Vent-Free Infrared Gas Heater:...

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