Question about Fahrenheat PHH15002 Oil Filled Baseboard Heater

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Oil baseboard heat v electric baseboard heat.

Redoing insulated, enclosed basement 25' x 26'. will frame and add insulation. laminate flooring. concerned about fire hazard. live in New York (cold winters). what if the basement floods? two young children (1st graders) will be playing down there. oil baseboard estimate (3 walls) came to $1750. thinking about running the oil baseboard on only one wall to save $. does code require a heating mechanism in basement? do I even need heat or could I use a portable electric oil-filled radiator heater? any thoughts?

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Two 8 ft baseboards will heat this basement fine. You should eliminate any sources of flooding before you invest in refinished your basement.

Posted on Mar 16, 2009

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I'm replacing a non-hydronic electric baseboard heating unit with a Fahrenheat hydronic one. My old unit was 240v using 2 conductors plus bare ground wire. The fahrenheat (PLF series) unit's instructions...


Hello. The red and the black are the hot wires. Therefore, connect one of your conductors to the red and the other conductor to the black. Use wirenuts. The bare ground wire should be solidly attached to the new unit's green wire using a wire nut.
Regards, Joe
PS: please rate my answer. Thank you.

Jan 06, 2010 | Fahrenheat Electric Hydronic Baseboard...

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Underfloor Radiant Heating for Your New Sunroom


You want to add a brand new sunroom onto your existing house. The problem is that you are not sure how to heat it. Electric heating with baseboard heaters will spoil the look that you want from your new room. Hot water baseboard is going to present all types of problems getting hooked in to the existing system and piping it. And, if you have hot air heating system then you will have the problem of getting ductwork to the room. There is another way to heat this room easily and efficiently.

Radiant heating has been one of the most comfortable and efficient ways for heating for many years. The problem has been in the past to find a good heating source for small radiant floors that will be affordable, effective and efficient.

This problem has been solved now, with the availability of small new electric combination heater- circulator units. These units use small electric heating elements together with a small circulator pump to give you a all in one heating source and circulator pump.

Now you just have to lay your tubing in the floor of the room you are adding on to your house. Then you run that tubing into your existing basement or other room in your house. The tubing and the electric are attached to the heating unit. Then, wire a thermostat to the unit, and you are now ready to make heat. This really makes heating a new addition room very inexpensive and easy to do.

The greatest thing about using this type of heating system is that most average do-it-yourself types can do this. All that is needed is a basic knowledge of plumbing and electric.
If you are thinking of building that little add-on and are worried about how you will heat it, think about using radiant floor heat and a small electric heater-circulator to do your project.

on Dec 05, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

How do i know what size baseboard heater to use in any given room.


Basically each baseboard should be rated for a particular heat output...Watts...which should have an equivalent to square footage...look in the Specs or askj the Supplier....and that will vary on the Heat loss of each particular room...how big the windows are....how well insulated the room is etc

Oct 16, 2009 | Fahrenheat Electric Convector Baseboard...

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I want to install (bathroom) an electric wall insert fan heater on an outside wall. Will the insulation and plastic vapour barrier be an issue???


Depends on the heater/fixture. All devices of this sort list minimum clearances between sides and combustable materials.

As to will insulation be a problem, depends what you call a problem. Will it need to be removed? Most likely yes if for no other reason then to provide cavity/freespace to install the heater. For a exterior wall application a small baseboard electric heater would be a better solution to the problem or a toekick electric heater under a sink vanity.

Oct 14, 2009 | Dimplex DGWH4031 Heater

1 Answer

I want to install 240v baseboard htrs in a below ground basement.


you must really love your hydro co
those heaters are a huge draw on your bill
why not install radiant heat they are cheep now in compairison
the unit is a central mount run the line in a loop arround basement and conect all the heaters in drop lines off the main line small thermostat valve for each room to control heat
cost is more for unit but savings are greater too they now make a light duty units designed for your porpose
single direct electric heaters are pigs on the hydro bell if you have gas or electric it is cheeper to run a small boiler or heat on demand system

Aug 04, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

3 Answers

How do you reduce an electric bill in a all electric house?


The biggest wasters of electrical energy are Heat and A/c, water heaters,dryers and ranges. The more you insulate the less you have to cool or heat. If you live in a warm climate, consider installing an attic fan that runs on a thermostat or timer. During the summer allow it to run, during winter turn it off. Ceiling fans in rooms that are occupied create the illusion of being cooler, allowing the thermostat to be turned up.I'm not sure of the exact numbers but any thermostat setting on your a/c below 78 is more inefficient so try kicking the a/c up and the heat down. I'm a Florida boy so I can't tell you much about baseboard heaters. I know that anything that heats things up cost a lot in energy.

Consider installing a hot water heater timer. Commonly called a "Little Grey Box". Whenever your water heater is not actually being used it is still heating the water. A big waster. Once installed set the timer to cycle the water heater off during times when you commonly don't use it. Overnight,when your at work etc....

Somewhat antiquated, but a clothesline always uses 100% less energy than a clothes dryer. :) Short of this, try to fill the dryer all the way and make sure your dryer vent and lint trap are clear.

Microwaves draw 1/3 the energy of a range and run for 1/10 of the time. Microwave as many things as you can. In our house we have started microwaving canned veggies and boxed side dishes and such.

These are the big ones I've done at my house. A lot of the other things seemed to be more work than they are worth. Some actually end up costing you more if you don't own the house for decades.

There are many sites you can visit such as your local power company and possibly your local government pages.

Good luck. I'm in the same boat with the high power bill.

Mar 24, 2009 | Fahrenheat F2543 Baseboard Heater

3 Answers

Need to calculate heat loss in a building for hydronic heat


In Ontario, we use a sanctioned set of calculations that takes into account the exposed area of each wall, roof and floor, factors in orientation of each surface and makes a parallel set of calculations for the windows and door openings.  In Ontario, the institute managing this process is HRAI and installers/designers should carry an HRAI card showing that they have passed the (non-trivial) exams.  I'm quite sure the HRAI process is based on similar ASHRAE-prescribed processes and other jurisdictions may refer directly back to ASHRAE or to some other local authority which in turn bases its process on ASHRAE, much as HRAI does.
In your case, there are two sets of calculations required.  One is, as you point out, the HL (and HG for summer) calculations (HL = heat loss; HG = heat gain).  The second set is to calculate the layout and BTU-delivery capability of your radiant system and identify those areas (lots of glass, typically) which will need supplementary heat, such as higher-temperature radiators like the models of Runtal.
I'm authorized only to do the first set of calculations in Ontario.  There are usually independent guys who work free-lance for heating contractors and who might be able to help you out.

Mar 18, 2009 | QMark HBB1004 Hydronic Baseboard Heater -...

1 Answer

Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater Under Electrical Recepticle


Hello,
I believe you interpretation of the code is a bit skewed in that the fundamental concern is to not route power cords over a heat source which might cause the insulation on that wire to exceed its rated operating temp and fail. The heaters themselves have shrowds over them so there are no exposed surfaces hot enough to melt wire insulation and when you think about it ..2000 watts disipated over a long baseboard section is not that hot. If I were you, I would go ahead and install them and not worry about the warning.. The warning also removes any liability from the heater manufacturer in the event something happens.. Common sense would dictate that you wouldn't intentionally drape power cords all over the heaters... Just use common sense and not worry about it..
Regards,
Rick

Dec 01, 2008 | Marley Electric Hydronic Baseboard Heater,...

1 Answer

Baseboard heaters


measure each room you want to heat. multiply the length x width, this will give you the square footage of the room to be heated, multiply that by 10 and that is the number of watts needed to heat the room using 220/240v baseboards.

Sep 11, 2008 | Fahrenheat PHH15002 Oil Filled Baseboard...

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