Question about Microsoft Office Excel 2003 for PC

1 Answer

Excel functions Enter # in I56 and J56, pull # from array below (G60 thru Q160) with I56 the # on top and J56 the # on the side result will be intersecting row and column with result and function IN M56.

Posted by on

  • bsevinc May 11, 2010

    It seems very confusing what you are saying. What do you mean when pull # and giving an area G60 through Q160. Is it sum of all those cells or average?

×

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.

    Welcome Back:

    Visited the website for 2 consecutive days.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 7 Answers

=INDEX(G60:Q160,J56,I56)

Posted on Apr 23, 2009

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

I NEED MS EXCEL CONVERT FORMULA FOR NUMBER TO CURRENCY


Here is a very popular bit of code from Microsoft that will convert any currency amount in a cell to English words. All code and text from below here is the work of Microsoft.

Summary
This article shows you how to create a sample, user-defined function named ConvertCurrencyToEnglish() to convert a numeric value to an English word representation. For example, the function will return the following words for the number 1234.56: One Thousand Two Hundred Thirty Four Dollars And Fifty Six Cents

The Function Wizard can also be used to enter a custom function in a worksheet. To use the Function Wizard, follow these steps:

1. Click the Function Wizard button, and select User Defined under Function Category.
2. Select ConvertCurrencyToEnglish, and enter your number or cell reference.
3. Click Finish

To Create the Sample Functions

1. Insert a module sheet into a workbook. To do this in Microsoft Excel 97 or Microsoft Excel 98, point to Macro on the Tools menu, and then click Visual Basic Editor. In the Visual Basic Editor, click Module on the Insert menu. In Microsoft Excel 5.0 or 7.0, point to Macro on the Insert menu and click Module.

2. Type the following code into the module sheet.
Function ConvertCurrencyToEnglish (ByVal MyNumber)

Dim Temp

Dim Dollars, Cents

Dim DecimalPlace, Count



ReDim Place(9) As String

Place(2) = " Thousand "

Place(3) = " Million "

Place(4) = " Billion "

Place(5) = " Trillion "



' Convert MyNumber to a string, trimming extra spaces.

MyNumber = Trim(Str(MyNumber))



' Find decimal place.

DecimalPlace = InStr(MyNumber, ".")



' If we find decimal place...

If DecimalPlace > 0 Then

' Convert cents

Temp = Left(Mid(MyNumber, DecimalPlace + 1) & "00", 2)

Cents = ConvertTens(Temp)



' Strip off cents from remainder to convert.

MyNumber = Trim(Left(MyNumber, DecimalPlace - 1))

End If



Count = 1

Do While MyNumber <> ""

' Convert last 3 digits of MyNumber to English dollars.

Temp = ConvertHundreds(Right(MyNumber, 3))

If Temp <> "" Then Dollars = Temp & Place(Count) & Dollars

If Len(MyNumber) > 3 Then

' Remove last 3 converted digits from MyNumber.

MyNumber = Left(MyNumber, Len(MyNumber) - 3)

Else

MyNumber = ""

End If

Count = Count + 1

Loop



' Clean up dollars.

Select Case Dollars

Case ""

Dollars = "No Dollars"

Case "One"

Dollars = "One Dollar"

Case Else

Dollars = Dollars & " Dollars"

End Select



' Clean up cents.

Select Case Cents

Case ""

Cents = " And No Cents"

Case "One"

Cents = " And One Cent"

Case Else

Cents = " And " & Cents & " Cents"

End Select



ConvertCurrencyToEnglish = Dollars & Cents

End Function







Private Function ConvertHundreds (ByVal MyNumber)

Dim Result As String



' Exit if there is nothing to convert.

If Val(MyNumber) = 0 Then Exit Function



' Append leading zeros to number.

MyNumber = Right("000" & MyNumber, 3)



' Do we have a hundreds place digit to convert?

If Left(MyNumber, 1) <> "0" Then

Result = ConvertDigit(Left(MyNumber, 1)) & " Hundred "

End If



' Do we have a tens place digit to convert?

If Mid(MyNumber, 2, 1) <> "0" Then

Result = Result & ConvertTens(Mid(MyNumber, 2))

Else

' If not, then convert the ones place digit.

Result = Result & ConvertDigit(Mid(MyNumber, 3))

End If



ConvertHundreds = Trim(Result)

End Function







Private Function ConvertTens (ByVal MyTens)

Dim Result As String



' Is value between 10 and 19?

If Val(Left(MyTens, 1)) = 1 Then

Select Case Val(MyTens)

Case 10: Result = "Ten"

Case 11: Result = "Eleven"

Case 12: Result = "Twelve"

Case 13: Result = "Thirteen"

Case 14: Result = "Fourteen"

Case 15: Result = "Fifteen"

Case 16: Result = "Sixteen"

Case 17: Result = "Seventeen"

Case 18: Result = "Eighteen"

Case 19: Result = "Nineteen"

Case Else

End Select

Else

' .. otherwise it's between 20 and 99.

Select Case Val(Left(MyTens, 1))

Case 2: Result = "Twenty "

Case 3: Result = "Thirty "

Case 4: Result = "Forty "

Case 5: Result = "Fifty "

Case 6: Result = "Sixty "

Case 7: Result = "Seventy "

Case 8: Result = "Eighty "

Case 9: Result = "Ninety "

Case Else

End Select



' Convert ones place digit.

Result = Result & ConvertDigit(Right(MyTens, 1))

End If



ConvertTens = Result

End Function







Private Function ConvertDigit (ByVal MyDigit)

Select Case Val(MyDigit)

Case 1: ConvertDigit = "One"

Case 2: ConvertDigit = "Two"

Case 3: ConvertDigit = "Three"

Case 4: ConvertDigit = "Four"

Case 5: ConvertDigit = "Five"

Case 6: ConvertDigit = "Six"

Case 7: ConvertDigit = "Seven"

Case 8: ConvertDigit = "Eight"

Case 9: ConvertDigit = "Nine"

Case Else: ConvertDigit = ""

End Select

End Function

Apr 15, 2010 | Broderbund Learn MS Windows XP and Excel...

1 Answer

My MS Excel vlookup function ASCII type table contains both upper case and lower case letters, characters like ( and % or *, and numbers. It seems to return the numerical equivalent of upper case letters...


Correct a #N/A error blueup_clv.gifShow All bluedrop_clv.gifHide All This error occurs when a value is not available to a function or formula.
  1. Optionally, click the cell that displays the error, click the button that appears ooui1_za06043871.gif, and then click Show Calculation Steps if it appears.
  2. Review the following possible causes and solutions. blueup_clv.gifMissing data, and #N/A or NA() has been entered in its place
    Replace #N/A with new data.
    Note You can enter #N/A in those cells where data is not yet available. Formulas that refer to those cells will then return #N/A instead of attempting to calculate a value.
    blueup_clv.gifGiving an inappropriate value for the lookup_value argument in the HLOOKUP, LOOKUP, MATCH, or VLOOKUP worksheet function
    Make sure that the lookup_value argument (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) is the correct type of value — for example, a value or a cell reference, but not a range reference. blueup_clv.gifUsing the VLOOKUP, HLOOKUP, or MATCH worksheet function to locate a value in an unsorted table
    By default, functions that look up information in tables must be sorted in ascending order. However, the VLOOKUP and HLOOKUP worksheet functions contain a range_lookup argument (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) that instructs the function to find an exact match even if the table is not sorted. To find an exact match, set the range_lookup argument to FALSE. The MATCH worksheet function contains a match_type argument that specifies the order the list must be sorted in to find a match. If the function cannot find a match, try changing the match_type argument. To find an exact match, set the match_type argument to 0.
    blueup_clv.gifUsing an argument in an array formula that is not the same number of rows or columns as the range that contains the array formula
    If the array formula (array formula: A formula that performs multiple calculations on one or more sets of values, and then returns either a single result or multiple results. Array formulas are enclosed between braces { } and are entered by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.) has been entered into multiple cells, make sure that the ranges referenced by the formula have the same number of rows and columns, or enter the array formula into fewer cells. For example, if the array formula has been entered into a range 15 rows high (C1:C15) and the formula refers to a range 10 rows high (A1:A10), the range C11:C15 will display #N/A. To correct this error, enter the formula into a smaller range (for example, C1:C10), or change the range to which the formula refers to the same number of rows (for example, A1:A15).
    blueup_clv.gifOmitting one or more required arguments from a built-in or custom worksheet function
    Enter all arguments (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) in the function.
    blueup_clv.gifUsing a custom worksheet function that is not available
    Make sure that the workbook that contains the worksheet function is open and the function is working properly.
    blueup_clv.gifRunning a macro that enters a function that returns #N/A
    Make sure that the arguments (argument: The values that a function uses to perform operations or calculations. The type of argument a function uses is specific to the function. Common arguments that are used within functions include numbers, text, cell references, and names.) in the function are correct and in the correct position.

Oct 31, 2008 | Computers & Internet

Tip

HOW TO COUNT THE OCCURRENCES OF A TEXT STRING


In the cell that you want the result to appear in, enter the appropriate formula from the following examples.
How to Count the Occurrences of a Number
Use this formula
=SUM(IF(range=number,1,0))
where range is the range that you want to search, and number is the number that you want to count.
NOTE: This formula must be entered as an array formula. To enter an array formula, press CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.
How to Count the Occurrences of a Text String
Method 1
Use this formula
=SUM(IF(range="text",1,0))
where range is the range that you want to search, and text is the text that you want to find (the text must be enclosed in quotation marks).
NOTE: The above formula must be entered as an array formula. To enter an array formula, press CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.
Method 2
Use the COUNTIF() function to count the occurrences of a text string. For example, use the formula
=COUNTIF(range,"text")
where range is the range of cells that you are evaluating, and text is the text string that you want to count instances of (note that text must be enclosed in quotation marks).
NOTE: This formula must be entered as an array formula. To enter an array formula, press CTRL+SHIFT+ENTER.
Wildcard characters can be used within the COUNTIF function.
The asterisk character (*) represents more than one character. For example, to count all the cells in the range a1:a10 that contain an "x," you can use the following formula:
=COUNTIF(a1:a10,"*x*")
The question mark character (?) can also be used to represent one wildcard character -- for example, to count all cells in the range whose second character is the letter, such as "ax" or "bx."
=COUNTIF(a1:a10,"?x*")

on Nov 11, 2013 | Microsoft Excel Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Convert numbers to text in excell


  1. Start Microsoft Excel.
  2. Press ALT+F11 to start the Visual Basic Editor.
  3. On the Insert menu, click Module.
  4. Type the following code into the module sheet. Option Explicit 'Main Function Function SpellNumber(ByVal MyNumber) Dim Dollars, Cents, Temp Dim DecimalPlace, Count ReDim Place(9) As String Place(2) = " Thousand " Place(3) = " Million " Place(4) = " Billion " Place(5) = " Trillion " ' String representation of amount. MyNumber = Trim(Str(MyNumber)) ' Position of decimal place 0 if none. DecimalPlace = InStr(MyNumber, ".") ' Convert cents and set MyNumber to dollar amount. If DecimalPlace > 0 Then Cents = GetTens(Left(Mid(MyNumber, DecimalPlace + 1) & _ "00", 2)) MyNumber = Trim(Left(MyNumber, DecimalPlace - 1)) End If Count = 1 Do While MyNumber <> "" Temp = GetHundreds(Right(MyNumber, 3)) If Temp <> "" Then Dollars = Temp & Place(Count) & Dollars If Len(MyNumber) > 3 Then MyNumber = Left(MyNumber, Len(MyNumber) - 3) Else MyNumber = "" End If Count = Count + 1 Loop Select Case Dollars Case "" Dollars = "No Dollars" Case "One" Dollars = "One Dollar" Case Else Dollars = Dollars & " Dollars" End Select Select Case Cents Case "" Cents = " and No Cents" Case "One" Cents = " and One Cent" Case Else Cents = " and " & Cents & " Cents" End Select SpellNumber = Dollars & Cents End Function ' Converts a number from 100-999 into text Function GetHundreds(ByVal MyNumber) Dim Result As String If Val(MyNumber) = 0 Then Exit Function MyNumber = Right("000" & MyNumber, 3) ' Convert the hundreds place. If Mid(MyNumber, 1, 1) <> "0" Then Result = GetDigit(Mid(MyNumber, 1, 1)) & " Hundred " End If ' Convert the tens and ones place. If Mid(MyNumber, 2, 1) <> "0" Then Result = Result & GetTens(Mid(MyNumber, 2)) Else Result = Result & GetDigit(Mid(MyNumber, 3)) End If GetHundreds = Result End Function ' Converts a number from 10 to 99 into text. Function GetTens(TensText) Dim Result As String Result = "" ' Null out the temporary function value. If Val(Left(TensText, 1)) = 1 Then ' If value between 10-19... Select Case Val(TensText) Case 10: Result = "Ten" Case 11: Result = "Eleven" Case 12: Result = "Twelve" Case 13: Result = "Thirteen" Case 14: Result = "Fourteen" Case 15: Result = "Fifteen" Case 16: Result = "Sixteen" Case 17: Result = "Seventeen" Case 18: Result = "Eighteen" Case 19: Result = "Nineteen" Case Else End Select Else ' If value between 20-99... Select Case Val(Left(TensText, 1)) Case 2: Result = "Twenty " Case 3: Result = "Thirty " Case 4: Result = "Forty " Case 5: Result = "Fifty " Case 6: Result = "Sixty " Case 7: Result = "Seventy " Case 8: Result = "Eighty " Case 9: Result = "Ninety " Case Else End Select Result = Result & GetDigit _ (Right(TensText, 1)) ' Retrieve ones place. End If GetTens = Result End Function ' Converts a number from 1 to 9 into text. Function GetDigit(Digit) Select Case Val(Digit) Case 1: GetDigit = "One" Case 2: GetDigit = "Two" Case 3: GetDigit = "Three" Case 4: GetDigit = "Four" Case 5: GetDigit = "Five" Case 6: GetDigit = "Six" Case 7: GetDigit = "Seven" Case 8: GetDigit = "Eight" Case 9: GetDigit = "Nine" Case Else: GetDigit = "" End Select End Function
uparrow.gifBack to the top How to use the SpellNumber sample function loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); To use the sample functions to change a number to written text, use one of the methods demonstrated in the following examples: uparrow.gifBack to the top Method 1: Direct Entry loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); You can change 32.50 into "Thirty Two Dollars and Fifty Cents" by entering the following formula into a cell: =SpellNumber(32.50) uparrow.gifBack to the top Method 2: Cell reference loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); You can refer to other cells in the workbook. For example, enter the number 32.50 into cell A1, and type the following formula into another cell: =SpellNumber(A1) uparrow.gifBack to the top Method 3: Paste Function or Insert Function loadTOCNode(2, 'moreinformation'); To enter a custom function into a worksheet, you can use Paste Function in Excel 2000, or you can use Insert Function in Excel 2002 and in Excel 2003. Excel 2000 loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); To use Paste Function, follow these steps:
  1. Select the cell that you want.
  2. Click Paste Function on the Standard toolbar.
  3. Under Function category, click User Defined.
  4. Under Function name, click SpellNumber, and then click OK.
  5. Enter the number or cell reference that you want, and then click OK.
Excel 2002 and Excel 2003 loadTOCNode(3, 'moreinformation'); To use Insert Function, follow these steps:
  1. Select the cell that you want.
  2. Click Insert Function on the Standard toolbar.
  3. Under Or select a category, click User Defined.
  4. In the Select a function list, click SpellNumber, and then click OK.
  5. Enter the number or cell reference that you want, and then click OK.

Apr 01, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

1 Answer

Need an excel formula.


The crude solution is:
=IF(Sheet3!I2="WA",IF(Sheet3!H2="Vancouver","X",IF(Sheet3!H2="Camas","X",IF(Sheet3!H2="Ridgefield","X",IF(Sheet3!H2="Washougal","X",IF(Sheet3!H2="Stevenson","X",IF(Sheet3!H2="Hockinson","X","?City?")))))),"?State?")

Where ?City? appears when the city referenced in H2 is not part of the lookup
and ?State? appears when something other than WA appears in I2.

But there is probably a better way to do this using an array of valid values like the one below:

AL NY TX WA Birmingham Albany Abilene Camas Huntsville Buffalo Galvaston Hockinson Russell New York Houston Ridgefield Stevenson Vancouver Washougal

In the scenario you could stuff the array in another worksheet and use the HLookup function to find the "Sheet3!I2" value in the first row of this array to determine which column to look in, then VLookup "Sheet3!H2" in the column of that array to see if the city referenced exists. Of course this is a much more complex formula, but it would be easily extendible without changing the formula every time.

For mor info, see "Lookup and Reference Functions" in the Excel Help.

Jun 11, 2009 | Microsoft Excel for PC

1 Answer

Slow speed tests


Your HP G60 has an 802.11 b/g card. 802.11g has a maximum rated speed of 54 mbps, like the router. You never get the actual "rated" speed with wireless cards, this would occur only with maximum signal strength, no network protocol overhead, no security, etc. if you were to replace your current card in the Satellite with an 802.11 b/g card, you would get comparable results.

Jan 15, 2009 | Intel PRO/Wireless 2100 MiniPCI 802.11b

1 Answer

Excel


Step1. Start Microsoft Excelmag-glass_10x10.gif and open the file you want to change. Step2. Double-click on the cell where you want the total to appear. Step3. Press the = key on the keyboard. This tells Excel that you are entering a formula into the cell. Step4. Enter the formula, then press Enter. Follow the steps below for an example. Step5. Enter an opening parenthesis character: (. Step6. Enter a cell name. For example: =(E2. Step7. Press the + key. Step8. Enter another cell name and a closing parenthesis character: ). For example: =(E2+E3). Step9. Enter a minus sign and a third cell name. For example: =(E2+E3)-E4. Step10. Press the Enter key to accept the formula. The cell will display the sum of the first two cells minus the third cell. $('.Article .Steps .Image').each(function(i,e){ e = $(e); e.find('img').error(function(){ $(this).unbind(); e.remove(); }); });
Tips & Warnings
  • Formulas are just equations. Instead of adding or subtracting numbers you are adding and subtracting the contents of a cell.
  • Excel includes a number of predefined functions to use as well. You can combine the predefined functions into your own formula. (See "How to Use Provided Excel Formulas.")
I hope it helps!!!

Dec 03, 2008 | Microsoft Office Professional 2007 Full...

2 Answers

Excel will not displaying the results of a trend array formula


Hi Griffnz,

Your "known Y's" or 'values' are in Column B. This is the first array in the Trend formula.

Your "known X's" or 'months' are in Column A. This is the second array in the trend formula.

The trend formula is supposed to give you a projection of what the rest of the values in Column B will be over the next few months (usually continuing cells in Column A). The cells you want these values to show up in represent the third array in the formula.

Thus, your formula should look more like: '=trend(B3:B14,A3:A14,A15:A18)'

However, your formula is leaving out The values in B and adding values from C - -- but there ARE no values in C. Apparently, C is where you want the values to appear. In that case, the C array would be the third array in your formula. This would look more like '=trend(B3:B14,A3:A14,C3:C14)

If this doesn't make sense, let me know.

Sep 30, 2008 | Microsoft Excel for PC

2 Answers

C++ programs


An array is a series of elements of the same type placed in contiguous memory locations that can be individually referenced by adding an index to a unique identifier
Initializing arrays. When declaring a regular array of local scope (within a function, for example), if we do not specify otherwise, its elements will not be initialized to any value by default, so their content will be undetermined until we store some value in them. The elements of global and static arrays, on the other hand, are automatically initialized with their default values, which for all fundamental types this means they are filled with zeros
include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int billy [] = {16, 2, 77, 40, 12071};
int n, result=0;

int main ()
{
for ( n=0 ; n<5 ; n++ )
{
result += billy[n];
}
cout << result;
return 0;
}
multidimensional array pseudo-multidimensional array #define WIDTH 5 #define HEIGHT 3 int jimmy [HEIGHT][WIDTH]; int n,m; int main () { for (n=0;n<HEIGHT;n++) for (m=0;m<WIDTH;m++) { jimmy[n][m]=(n+1)*(m+1); } return 0; } #define WIDTH 5 #define HEIGHT 3 int jimmy [HEIGHT * WIDTH]; int n,m; int main () { for (n=0;n<HEIGHT;n++) for (m=0;m<WIDTH;m++) { jimmy[n*WIDTH+m]=(n+1)*(m+1); } return 0; }
and now for trignometry
#include<iostream>
#include<cmath>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
int factorial(int);
int n = 3, i = 1;
double x, x2, b, PI, r;
char choice;
//r = x * (PI / 180)

cout<<"Please enter an angle value => ";
cin>>x;
cout<<"Is the angle value in Degree or Radian?"<<endl;
cout<<"Type D if its in degree "<<endl;
cout<<"Type R if its in radian "<<endl;
cin>>choice;


if((choice = 'R')||(choice = 'r'))
do{
i++; n = 3; x2 = 0; b = x2;
{
if(i == 1)
x2 = x - (pow(x,n) /factorial(n));
n = n + 2;
};
else
{
x2 = (x2 + ((pow(x,n)) /(factorial(n))) - (pow(x,n+2)) / (factorial(n+2)));
n = n + 4;
}


}while(abs(b - x2) > 0.000001);
else
//convert it to r

r = x * PI /180;

//cout<<"error occured/n";
cout<<"sin(x) = "<<x2<<endl;

return 0;
}

Mar 24, 2008 | ArcMedia JavaScript Source Code 3000 Pro...

1 Answer

Excel formula


Yes, there is a function in MS Excel called "sumproduct" which multiplies the componenets in an array or arrays, then totals the result, eg :

=SUMPRODUCT(D4:D20,B4:B20) ...Job done...Enjoy !

Jan 16, 2008 | Microsoft Excel for PC

Not finding what you are looking for?
Microsoft Office Excel 2003 for PC Logo

Related Topics:

110 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Microsoft Computers & Internet Experts

micky dee

Level 3 Expert

2642 Answers

Les Dickinson
Les Dickinson

Level 3 Expert

18344 Answers

Brian Sullivan
Brian Sullivan

Level 3 Expert

27725 Answers

Are you a Microsoft Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...