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Windows problem I have a program running in dos mode, I already set the config.nt but still there is an error. The error is.. 16 bit MS-DOS Subsystem... H:\ip\MRK1.EXE The NTVDM CPU has encountered an illegal instruction. CS:20d9 IP:c411 OP:fe268907 5e Choose 'Close' to terminate the application. Please i need help for my program to run and work properly. Thanks & Godspeed

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  • Bob
    Bob May 11, 2010

    Watt program do u want 2 run???

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Try this.
Right Click on your DOS program EXE file. Then go to properties and go to Compatibilty TAB. Click in Check Box for Compatibitlity mode and select WINDOWS 95.

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

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How to Run Turbo Pascal Full Screen mode on Windows 7


Now that's a program I've not worked with in a while ;-) I haven't used it since my early high school days in the 1990s. Turbo is a really old application that has been around for ages- unfortunately, being as such, it is only capable of developing 16-bit DOS applications, which has, for better or worse, gone the way of the dinosaur. In the x64-bit versions of Windows Vista and 7, all 16-bit native support has actually gone out the window in favor of 32-bit and 64-bit application development. This is why DosBox was invented- it is a true 16-bit DOS environment (much like command.com and CMD.exe used to be) that is capable of running all the older DOS programs that are no longer compatible with Windows.
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Hope this helps,
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Windows system32 autoexec.nt fail to operate


Win XP SP2: System not suitable for running MS-DOS. ... This file is part of the Windows 16-bit subsystem and usually lives in the system32 folder. ... P.S. If this doesn't work check out the Microsoft web page for additional fixes. ... Computer Tips Daily - Run your Windows PC like a pro! No matter what your skill ...
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Jul 16, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

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Ntvdm cpu encountered illegal operation Hi all! I just installed Maya 2010 from a torrent file and since then I got this famous error message. It's just appeears as three command prompts appearing at the...


If I am reading this right your issue is not the application but where you obtained the application. Maya 2010 is a modern design application and comes in 32 & 64 bit versions. It is not a 16 bit application.

When Windows encounters a legacy application it calls the NTVDM for the legacy application to run in.

The fact that the application is calling the NTVDM is highly suspicious. NTVDM is the NT Virtual Dos Machine, a way for legacy applications to run in NT environments.

NT environments are Windows NT 3.5, NT 4.0, Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP (Home, Pro & Media Center Ed), Vista (all versions) and Windows 7.

Old (legacy) applications written for 16 bit date back to Windows 3.1 and include Windows 95, 98 and Millennium Edition.

I would obtain a copy of Maya 2010 from a reputable outlet instead of Bit Torrent as "warez" frequently contain malicious items that will infect and ruin your machine.

Feb 05, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

I recently had a HD crash and have replaced it with another HD using the same Windows XP OS. While trying to reload programs that were on the old HD to the replacement, some of the programs get this error...


I always receive a "C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT" error message.

“C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32\AUTOEXEC.NT. The system file is not suitable for running MS-
DOS and Microsoft Windows applications. Choose ‘Close’ to terminate the application.”

This error message is not caused by the installation CD-ROM, but rather by the
“Autoexec.nt” system file. Windows is unable to find this file when launching the
installation CD-ROM, the file most likely having been deleted by another application.

To resolve this problem, proceed as follows:
1. Go to “C:\Windows\repair” and find the file “Autoexec.nt”.
2.Copy this file to “C:\Windows\system32”.
3.Right-click the file “Autoexec.nt” that you have just copied, and select
“Properties”.
4.Tick the “Read-only” box and then click “OK”.

Good luck!

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1 Answer

16 bit MS DOS Subsystem error


I found a website of people who have the same problem;as you will see Microsoft does not have a fix for it. The recommended fix is to backup your data and reload Windows.
http://www.techspot.com/vb/all/windows/t-5039-NTVDM-CPU-illegal-instruction-.html

Pls rate this solution.

Apr 13, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

Windows problem


I would say the easiest thing to do with legacy programs is to run a virtualized version of an older windows OS within Vista.

Visit VMWare Server to download their free product that can run in Vista. You can then "find" a windows 98 cd-rom image to install with. It is fairly easy, but there will be a little work getting Win98 running.

This is probably the best way since you don't have to worry about compatibility with Vista, and also if the legacy app crashes it only crashes your VM and not your whole system.

If you would like some more in-depth discussion about virtualization, just email me.

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Old DOS program in WIN XP


hello sir
i have f500 compaq laptop i have no winxp driver in sound driver plz help me
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MS-Dos prompt in Windows 2000 & Xp


u can just press alt + enter when u r running ms dos prompt in xp or 2000, it will show u full screen and u once again press alt + enter it will back to normal mode when u come out u just type exit from the command prompt

Mar 16, 2008 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Unable to load


How to get to a MS-DOS prompt.
Reason: If Windows or the computer is not operating properly, it may be necessary to get to a MS-DOS prompt to diagnose and to perform additional troubleshooting on the computer.
Solution: MS-DOS users
Windows 3.x users
Windows 95, 98 and ME users
Windows NT, 2000 and XP users
Windows Vista users
Other PC Operating System users

MS-DOS users If you are running MS-DOS with no other operating systems, the computer should be booting into a MS-DOS prompt automatically unless you have a shell or other program loading automatically. If the computer is not getting you to a MS-DOS prompt, reboot the computer and as the computer is booting, press the F5 key when you see the message "Starting MS-DOS" or the MS-DOS version. This will load the default standard MS-DOS. If you successfully get to a MS-DOS prompt and would like to prevent the computer from loading the program that is preventing you from getting to a MS-DOS prompt, or if you would like to fix possible error messages you may be receiving when booting the computer, edit the autoexec.bat and/or the config.sys files.

Windows 95, 98, and ME users If you are able to get into Windows 95, 98 or ME, you can get to a MS-DOS prompt by following the below steps.
  1. Click Start
  2. Click Run
  3. Type "command" and press enter.
This will open a MS-DOS shell. However, if you are attempting to troubleshoot an issue with the computer and are using Microsoft Windows 95 or Windows 98we suggest you restart the computer into MS-DOS. To do this follow the below steps.
  1. Click Start
  2. Click Shutdown
  3. Choose the option to restart the computer into a MS-DOS prompt.
If you are unable to get into Windows 95 or Windows 98 to get into a MS-DOS prompt, follow the below instructions (Windows ME does not have this option).
  1. Reboot the computer
  2. As the computer is booting, press the F8 key when you hear a beep or when you see "Starting Windows 95" or "Starting Windows 98". Windows 98 users sometimes may find it easier to press and hold the left CTRL key as the computer is booting.
  3. If done properly the user should get to a screen similar to the below screen.
Microsoft Windows 95 Startup Menu
============================= 1. Normal
2. Logged (\BOOTLOG.TXT)
3. Safe mode
4. Step-by-step confirmation
5. Command prompt only
6. Safe mode command prompt only
Enter a choice: 1
F5=Safe Mode Shift+F5=Command prompt Shift+F8= Step-by-step confirmation [N]

4. Select the option for Safe mode command prompt only.
Windows NT, 2000, XP, and Vista users If you're running Windows NT, 2000, or Windows XP and need to get to MS-DOS prompt follow the below steps.
  1. Click Start
  2. Click Run or click in the "Start Search" field if you're running Vista
  3. Type "cmd" or "command" and press enter.
Additional information about the difference between "cmd" and "command" can be found on document CH000395. If you're attempting to get into a MS-DOS prompt to troubleshoot the computer boot the computer into safe mode. Additional information about how to get into safe mode can be found on document CHSAFE. Windows 2000, XP, and Vista users who are unable to boot the computer into Normal Windows mode or Safe mode can also enter the recovery console to manage their computer from a prompt. Additional information about how to do this can be found on document CH000627. Finally, if you are experiencing issues getting into Windows NT, 2000, or XP, it may be necessary to run troubleshooting steps from a MS-DOS prompt. It is recommended that the Network Administrator get into the MS-DOS prompt by using either a standard MS-DOS boot diskette (note: will not be able to access data using a standard MS-DOS bootable diskette) or the ERD diskettes created after the installation of Windows NT, or boot from the Windows XP CD.

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Dec 06, 2007 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

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