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Cannot communicate with www.microsoft.com(207.46.19.190)

Network diagnostic pinged the remote host but did not receive a response

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  • yas_cool26 Feb 11, 2009

    how to renew the ipconfig?

  • yas_cool26 Feb 11, 2009

    i have tried to the command but it's said no operation can be performed on local area connection while it has its media disconnected.

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Have you tried the {ipconfig/renew } command

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

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My laptop cannot connect to the Internet although there is full Wifi,can I get help with that ?


If your OS is Windows
Start
type in search program and file
cmd
right click cmd.exe
select Run as administrator
type in ping www.google.com
press enter
if you get a similar response.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
C:\WINDOWS\system32>ping www.google.com
Pinging www.google.com [203.184.8.30] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 203.184.8.30: bytes=32 time=23ms TTL=60
Reply from 203.184.8.30: bytes=32 time=36ms TTL=60
Reply from 203.184.8.30: bytes=32 time=28ms TTL=60
Reply from 203.184.8.30: bytes=32 time=19ms TTL=60
Ping statistics for 203.184.8.30:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 19ms, Maximum = 36ms, Average = 26ms

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
then type in the following
ipconfig /flushdns
you should get the following
C:\WINDOWS\system32>ipconfig /flushdns
Windows IP Configuration
Successfully flushed the DNS Resolver Cache.


You should be good to go

Aug 29, 2016 | Acer PC Laptops

Tip

BASIC Wireless Troubleshooting Steps in Windows XP


<p><b>BASIC Wireless Troubleshooting Steps:</b><br /> <p><b>Verify that the network adapter is being seen by the operating system:</b><br /> <br />Check Microsoft Windows Device Manager and look for an icon that appears as Network Adapters and see if the network card listed in Mini-PCI information table is installed:<br /> <ol> <li> Right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties. <li> Click the Hardware tab and press the Device Manager button. The network card should appear under Network Adapters.<br /><b>Note:</b> If the card has a exclamation mark over a yellow background, then this is an indication that the card is experiencing a problem. Go to Driver download step 5. </li></ol> <p><b>Verify that the radio is enabled:</b><br /> <p>It is possible to disable the transmitter of the wireless card without Device Manager showing any problems. Most wireless cards will put an icon in the system tray (the line of icons in the lower right corner of your screen). Right click this icon and it may have a menu option to enable/turn on the wireless radio.<br /> <p><b>Check for association to an Access Point:</b><br /> <p>If you double-click the previously mentioned system tray icon, the configuration utility of the wireless card will appear. This utility will be able to show the status of the wireless card, showing what channel the card is using and what signal strength is being received. It may be difficult to maintain a connection if signal strength is low due to either interference or distance. For example, interference can be caused by 2.4GHz cordless phones, other Access Points in the area, and physical structures such as load bearing walls or metal partitions.<br /> <p><b>Note:</b> The utility can be used to configure the wireless card settings, but if using Windows XP Zero Configuration or Access Connections, you will need to use those programs to actually configure the wireless card as they will overwrite the setting of the utility.<br /> <p><b>Check the SSID (the Network name of the wireless network you are trying to connect to) and security settings:</b><br /> <p><b>Note:</b> The SSID and WEP key are case sensitive.<br /> <ul> <li> The connection will fail if the SSID is incorrect. <li> The most common security setting is the use of a WEP key. This involves using a 5 digit alphanumeric key for 64bit encryption or 13 digit alphanumeric key for 128bit encryption. Some systems will only allow a hexadecimal (0-9, A-F) key of either 10 (64bit) or 26 (128bit) characters. It may be necessary to convert your alphanumeric key to a hexadecimal one in order to connect properly. </li></ul> <p><b>Note:</b> It may also be necessary to temporarily disable the security features in order to check for basic connectivity.<br /> <p><b>Verify that the most recent driver for the adapter is installed.</b><br /> <p><b>Verify the hardware compatibility with the Access Point:</b><br /> <p>Often, vendors of Access Points will add features to improve their product. Unfortunately, these extra features are not always compatible with all hardware. Consult the product documentation for the Access Point about the possible need to disable these features. Also, there are often new firmware updates to an Access Point that may solve some issues. Again, consult with the Access Point manufacturer for updates.<br /> <p><b>Verify that TCP/IP (or other appropriate protocol) is properly installed:</b><br /> <p>To check this: <br /> <ol> <li> Right-click the My Network Places icon and select Properties. The wireless card should be present as Local Area Connection. <li> Right-click the appropriate Local Area Connection and select Properties. In the Properties window, make sure that the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is installed. <li> If TCP/IP is not installed, click Install, click Protocol, and then click TCP/IP. <li> Once installed make sure that Obtain an IP address automatically, and Obtain DNS server address automatically are checked (if using DHCP). To verify this, highlight the TCP/IP protocol, and select Properties. </li></ol> <p><b>Note:</b> Only use a Static IP Address if your network/Service Provider requires one. <br /> <p><b>Verify the TCP/IP address:</b><br /> <ol> <li> Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. <li> Type the command, ipconfig. This will list the IP address for the local machine. <li> If this returns a 169.x.x.x or 0.0.0.0 address, then type the following commands, ipconfig /release and then ipconfig /renew. You should then receive a TCP/IP address appropriate to your network, along with a Default Gateway address. <li> Try to communicate with it by typing this command ping x.x.x.x where x.x.x.x is the IP address of the Default Gateway. <li> If this does not give a reply (see the example in step 9) or you did not receive a TCP/IP address, go to the next step.</li></ol> <p><b>Ping the loopback address:</b><br /> <ol> <li> Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt. <li> Type the command, ping 127.0.0.1. This will send a message to the internal network stack on the machine. You should see a response like this: </li></ol> <p><b>Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:</b><br /> <p>Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time&lt;10ms TTL=128<br />Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time&lt;10ms TTL=128<br />Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time&lt;10ms TTL=128<br />Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time&lt;10ms TTL=128<br /> <p>Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:<br />Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),<br />Approximate round trip times in milliseconds:<br />Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms<br /> <p><b>Verify that the hardware is functioning using diagnostics. </b><br /> <ul> <li> Run diagnostics on the wireless card. </li></ul> <p><b>Install latest Service Packs for Operating System or Network Client:</b><br /> <p>It may be necessary to install Service Packs for either the operating system or for any additional network clients that may be installed. Contact the software vendor for these updates which are usually free downloads.<br />

on Jan 24, 2011 | PC Laptops

Tip

Basic Wireless Network Troubleshooting


BASIC Wireless Troubleshooting Steps:
Verify that the network adapter is being seen by the operating system:

Check Microsoft Windows Device Manager and look for an icon that appears as Network Adapters and see if the network card listed in Mini-PCI information table is installed:
  1. Right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties.
  2. Click the Hardware tab and press the Device Manager button. The network card should appear under Network Adapters.
    Note: If the card has a exclamation mark over a yellow background, then this is an indication that the card is experiencing a problem. Go to Driver download step 5.
Verify that the radio is enabled:
It is possible to disable the transmitter of the wireless card without Device Manager showing any problems. Most wireless cards will put an icon in the system tray (the line of icons in the lower right corner of your screen). Right click this icon and it may have a menu option to enable/turn on the wireless radio.
Check for association to an Access Point:
If you double-click the previously mentioned system tray icon, the configuration utility of the wireless card will appear. This utility will be able to show the status of the wireless card, showing what channel the card is using and what signal strength is being received. It may be difficult to maintain a connection if signal strength is low due to either interference or distance. For example, interference can be caused by 2.4GHz cordless phones, other Access Points in the area, and physical structures such as load bearing walls or metal partitions.
Note: The utility can be used to configure the wireless card settings, but if using Windows XP Zero Configuration or Access Connections, you will need to use those programs to actually configure the wireless card as they will overwrite the setting of the utility.
Check the SSID (the Network name of the wireless network you are trying to connect to) and security settings:
Note: The SSID and WEP key are case sensitive.
  • The connection will fail if the SSID is incorrect.
  • The most common security setting is the use of a WEP key. This involves using a 5 digit alphanumeric key for 64bit encryption or 13 digit alphanumeric key for 128bit encryption. Some systems will only allow a hexadecimal (0-9, A-F) key of either 10 (64bit) or 26 (128bit) characters. It may be necessary to convert your alphanumeric key to a hexadecimal one in order to connect properly.
Note: It may also be necessary to temporarily disable the security features in order to check for basic connectivity.
Verify that the most recent driver for the adapter is installed.
Verify the hardware compatibility with the Access Point:
Often, vendors of Access Points will add features to improve their product. Unfortunately, these extra features are not always compatible with all hardware. Consult the product documentation for the Access Point about the possible need to disable these features. Also, there are often new firmware updates to an Access Point that may solve some issues. Again, consult with the Access Point manufacturer for updates.
Verify that TCP/IP (or other appropriate protocol) is properly installed:
To check this:
  1. Right-click the My Network Places icon and select Properties. The wireless card should be present as Local Area Connection.
  2. Right-click the appropriate Local Area Connection and select Properties. In the Properties window, make sure that the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is installed.
  3. If TCP/IP is not installed, click Install, click Protocol, and then click TCP/IP.
  4. Once installed make sure that Obtain an IP address automatically, and Obtain DNS server address automatically are checked (if using DHCP). To verify this, highlight the TCP/IP protocol, and select Properties.
Note: Only use a Static IP Address if your network/Service Provider requires one.
Verify the TCP/IP address:
  1. Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. Type the command, ipconfig. This will list the IP address for the local machine.
  3. If this returns a 169.x.x.x or 0.0.0.0 address, then type the following commands, ipconfig /release and then ipconfig /renew. You should then receive a TCP/IP address appropriate to your network, along with a Default Gateway address.
  4. Try to communicate with it by typing this command ping x.x.x.x where x.x.x.x is the IP address of the Default Gateway.
  5. If this does not give a reply (see the example in step 9) or you did not receive a TCP/IP address, go to the next step.
Ping the loopback address:
  1. Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. Type the command, ping 127.0.0.1. This will send a message to the internal network stack on the machine. You should see a response like this:
Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milliseconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
Verify that the hardware is functioning using diagnostics.
  • Run diagnostics on the wireless card.
Install latest Service Packs for Operating System or Network Client:
It may be necessary to install Service Packs for either the operating system or for any additional network clients that may be installed. Contact the software vendor for these updates which are usually free downloads.

NOTE:Words and Folder names on this tourbleshooting step may be different with win Vista and win7. ^_^

on Jun 19, 2010 | PC Laptops

1 Answer

My wireless does not work!How I can turn on again?


BASIC Wireless Troubleshooting Steps:
Verify that the network adapter is being seen by the operating system:

Check Microsoft Windows Device Manager and look for an icon that appears as Network Adapters and see if the network card listed in Mini-PCI information table is installed:
  1. Right-click the My Computer icon and select Properties.
  2. Click the Hardware tab and press the Device Manager button. The network card should appear under Network Adapters.
    Note: If the card has a exclamation mark over a yellow background, then this is an indication that the card is experiencing a problem. Go to Driver download step 5.
Verify that the radio is enabled:
It is possible to disable the transmitter of the wireless card without Device Manager showing any problems. Most wireless cards will put an icon in the system tray (the line of icons in the lower right corner of your screen). Right click this icon and it may have a menu option to enable/turn on the wireless radio.
Check for association to an Access Point:
If you double-click the previously mentioned system tray icon, the configuration utility of the wireless card will appear. This utility will be able to show the status of the wireless card, showing what channel the card is using and what signal strength is being received. It may be difficult to maintain a connection if signal strength is low due to either interference or distance. For example, interference can be caused by 2.4GHz cordless phones, other Access Points in the area, and physical structures such as load bearing walls or metal partitions.
Note: The utility can be used to configure the wireless card settings, but if using Windows XP Zero Configuration or Access Connections, you will need to use those programs to actually configure the wireless card as they will overwrite the setting of the utility.
Check the SSID (the Network name of the wireless network you are trying to connect to) and security settings:
Note: The SSID and WEP key are case sensitive.
  • The connection will fail if the SSID is incorrect.
  • The most common security setting is the use of a WEP key. This involves using a 5 digit alphanumeric key for 64bit encryption or 13 digit alphanumeric key for 128bit encryption. Some systems will only allow a hexadecimal (0-9, A-F) key of either 10 (64bit) or 26 (128bit) characters. It may be necessary to convert your alphanumeric key to a hexadecimal one in order to connect properly.
Note: It may also be necessary to temporarily disable the security features in order to check for basic connectivity.
Verify that the most recent driver for the adapter is installed.
Verify the hardware compatibility with the Access Point:
Often, vendors of Access Points will add features to improve their product. Unfortunately, these extra features are not always compatible with all hardware. Consult the product documentation for the Access Point about the possible need to disable these features. Also, there are often new firmware updates to an Access Point that may solve some issues. Again, consult with the Access Point manufacturer for updates.
Verify that TCP/IP (or other appropriate protocol) is properly installed:
To check this:
  1. Right-click the My Network Places icon and select Properties. The wireless card should be present as Local Area Connection.
  2. Right-click the appropriate Local Area Connection and select Properties. In the Properties window, make sure that the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is installed.
  3. If TCP/IP is not installed, click Install, click Protocol, and then click TCP/IP.
  4. Once installed make sure that Obtain an IP address automatically, and Obtain DNS server address automatically are checked (if using DHCP). To verify this, highlight the TCP/IP protocol, and select Properties.
Note: Only use a Static IP Address if your network/Service Provider requires one.
Verify the TCP/IP address:
  1. Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. Type the command, ipconfig. This will list the IP address for the local machine.
  3. If this returns a 169.x.x.x or 0.0.0.0 address, then type the following commands, ipconfig /release and then ipconfig /renew. You should then receive a TCP/IP address appropriate to your network, along with a Default Gateway address.
  4. Try to communicate with it by typing this command ping x.x.x.x where x.x.x.x is the IP address of the Default Gateway.
  5. If this does not give a reply (see the example in step 9) or you did not receive a TCP/IP address, go to the next step.
Ping the loopback address:
  1. Click Start, select Programs, select Accessories, and then click Command Prompt.
  2. Type the command, ping 127.0.0.1. This will send a message to the internal network stack on the machine. You should see a response like this:
Pinging 127.0.0.1 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Reply from 127.0.0.1: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=128
Ping statistics for 127.0.0.1:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milliseconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
Verify that the hardware is functioning using diagnostics.
  • Run diagnostics on the wireless card.
Install latest Service Packs for Operating System or Network Client:
It may be necessary to install Service Packs for either the operating system or for any additional network clients that may be installed. Contact the software vendor for these updates which are usually free downloads.

Mar 28, 2010 | Acer Aspire 4520-5582 Notebook

1 Answer

HI...since yahoo mail went down monday i cant get on any part of yahoo at all.......Why? thx Hellsvampbiker


I don't recall Yahoo going down on Monday, but it sounds like you might have a virus that changed your HOSTS file, which is an override for websites. Here's a good way to check:

1. Hold down the Windows logo key and press "R". A dialog box will pop up.
2. Type "CMD" without the quotes and click "OK".
3. You will see a black box appear. In that box, type "ping www.yahoo.com" without the quotes and press enter.

It will take 5 seconds for a successful test looking somewhat like this:

Pinging www-real.wa1.b.yahoo.com [XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX: bytes=32 time=56ms TTL=57
Reply from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX: bytes=32 time=53ms TTL=57
Reply from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX: bytes=32 time=51ms TTL=57
Reply from XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX: bytes=32 time=53ms TTL=57
If it cannot get to yahoo, it will take about 10 seconds and look like this:

Ping request could not find host www.yahoo.com. Please check the name and try again.

OR

Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Ping statistics for XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

If it cannot find Yahoo, navigate to C:\windows\system32\drivers\etc and look for a file called HOSTS. Rename that file to HOSTS.old. Once you've renamed the file, try to ping yahoo again. You should get a response, and you should be able to access yahoo.

If you need more troubleshooting help (if this doesn't work) send me a message and we can try some other steps.

Oct 29, 2009 | Compaq Presario Notebook

1 Answer

Voip tunnel configuration was not received on address


Establishing a VoIP tunnel requires that you have either an accessible IP on the remote host with which to do IP-IP calls or that you have a VoIP server with which to route the calls between IP digital and analog lines.

Usually this error indicates that in the configuration somewhere you have entered a destination IP that does not recognize either of these as being available. So the first thing I would check is your Firewall settings, then your network connectivity, and then troubleshoot your IP destination.

See if you can ping your VoIP destination from a command line and if connectivity seems good, make sure that everything needed to initiate the connection is running on both ends.

Sep 29, 2009 | HP Pavilion dv2000t Notebook

1 Answer

IBM thinkpad T21


Hi,
Bad cable, bad network configuration or bad motherboard, in that order.
Try manual settings for the wired connection, do a repair and see what the comment is.
good luck

Dec 23, 2007 | IBM ThinkPad T21 Notebook

1 Answer

Vpn error. 800


Resolutions: 1) if you have firewall, open TCP Port 1723, IP Protocol 47 (GRE). 2) make sure you can reach the VPN server by using ping. Sometimes, poor connection can cause this issue too. 3) You may need to updated firmware on a router or firewall if other OS (win9x/nt/me/w2k) works except XP. 4) The VPN server may not be able to get IP from DHCP for the VPN client. So, you may want to re-configure VPN host networking settings. For XP pro VPN host, go to the Properties of the VPN>Network, check Specify TCP/IP address and Allow calling computer to specify its own IP address, and uncheck Assign TCP/IP addresses automatically using DHCP. 5) Make sure no other secure software blocks your access, for example, if you use Norton secure software, you may need to add the remote client's IP so that the client can access. 6) If your VPN running on a Windows RRAS with NAT enabled, you may want to check the NAT settings. 7) If you can establish the VPN from the desktop at home but not from the laptop. Make sure no security software like Microsoft OneCare software that blocks the GRE.

Oct 01, 2007 | Acer Aspire 5100 Notebook

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