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Had a power outatge... the power is back, but no hot water

I have a goodman tankless water heater. my neighborhood lost power last night. power was restored, but i have no hot water. i just the circuit breaker, but no luck.  help... i need a hot shower.

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  • jamisonbryan Feb 09, 2009

    everything looks connected... any other ideas?

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There is a fuse inside the case that you open on the bottom of the tankless water heater. Check to make sure it was not popped

Posted on Feb 09, 2009

  • Jeremy Reddick
    Jeremy Reddick Feb 09, 2009

    Is this electric or gas?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Tip

Water Heaters go Tankless


You may or may not have heard about these cool little devices by now, but if not, here is the low down.

Tankless water heaters are used all across Europe and come in several varieties.

1. Natural gas fired on demand Tankless
2. Oil Fired Tankless
3. Electrical Tankless

The most prevalent among these is the gas fired version.

In America, these energy savers are just starting to gain a foothold.
Leaders in the field are Titan, Bosch, Rinnai, and Noritz to name a few.

The real benefit to Tankless over Standard water heaters is that you never waste energy heating water that sits in a tank cooling until you use it.
If you have a 20 to 80 gallon water in your home, it will run night and day at odd internals maintaining it's own heat.

What this means to you is that in a typical day, whether you use hot water that day or not, is that your water heater will cycle many times to maintain it's heat whether the hot water is used or not.

Some people try to drive this wasted energy use down by wrapping their water heater with thermal blankets, or by insulating the water heater closet itself, which has only proven to be partially effective.

Also bear in mind that these Tankless water heaters are quite small compared to the Tank version, some are as small as 18 by 12 inches.
This means that your old water heater closet can now be used to store your valuables without fear of starting a fire.

A further waste of energy occurs when the exhaust heat is funneled to the outside when it could have been diverted to a heat exchanger or other energy conservation device.

Tankless water heaters perform far better in energy use than the old school, Tank type water heater by simply heating water exactly when it is needed, then shutting down when the hot water tap is turned off.
What this means for you, the consumer is that you will have hot water any time you need it, and the water will remain hot as long as the hot water tap is opened.

There are virtually no cold water periods for a tankless water heater.
You have an endless stream of hot water, without wasting a single BTU of heat, kilowatt of electricity, or ounce of natural gas.

The real surprise here is that nobody really knows just how much their utility bill is being affected by that Tank style water heater until the first utility bill arrives. The savings are immediate and significant, both in terms of less energy consumption and Dollars saved.

Let me drive that point home in real life terms.
You definitely will NOT use MORE energy after your install.
You will most Certainly use less!

There are several typical applications for Tankless systems in any common home.

1. Low Volume On Demand heaters can be installed under the sink.
2. High Volume Tankless Whole House heaters supply the entire home.
3. On demand Budget Tankless heaters can be located at the sink coupled with whole house heaters for faster hot water delivery to eliminate cold spots. These are the most popular for the beginner Tankless solutions.
Your cold water pipe is split from the cold water valve itself to the Tankless heater under the sink as well as the cold water tap. The hot water outlet is then connected to the Tankless water heater under the sink to provide instant hot water, eliminating the need for a hot water tap from the main hot water supply. This results in even less energy waste since the smaller Tankless heater uses less energy than a whole house Tankless unit.
4. On demand Tankless heaters use virtually no energy to heat unused water. When the hot water tap is off, the Tankless unit is off.

The price point for these Tankless models is fairly competitive against a standard water heater, but can sometimes be more expensive depending on the model and water volume you require. What matters most though is that these Tankless versions begin paying for themselves the day they are installed.

My final word on this is simple.
Most other countries in the world have been using tankless water heaters for a very long time due to natural gas and oil prices. Their adoption of these devices is a necessity rather than a purchase of convenience.
In terms of technology, America falls close to last place in this field, as well as many other areas where energy consumption is a factor.

When you purchase a Tankless water heater, you not only save money, but you also help the environment by wasting less energy to heat the same amount of water you consume on a per use basis. You will also use somewhat less water since you no longer have to wait for that cold water to leave the tap so the hot water will finally flow.

The choice is yours.
Choose wisely!

Please Vote for this Tip if you found it helpful.
Bob S.

on Mar 25, 2010 | Plumbing

1 Answer

Will not fire at all, trys to light but get the e1 code . used to work intermitently or fire right of way but then go cold and back to hot for about five min. then stay hot now wont even light


Before calling service technician, open following links for troubleshoot resources:
http://waterheatertimer.org/pdf/Bosch_E1_troubleshooting.pdf
http://www.bosch-climate.us/bosch-hot-water/aquastar-service-bulletins/
http://waterheatertimer.org/Troubleshoot-Bosch-Tankless-water-heater.html
http://waterheatertimer.org/Crossover.html

Before installing tankless water heater, read the service manuals and product manual to make sure you have testing skills and equipment needed to repair tankless gas water heater, and that you are prepared to buy expensive parts when needed and do the recommended yearly and monthly maintenance as outlined in manual.
Also check that area has qualified service technician, and that person carries parts on-hand, and is certified for your model number. Keep Tankless manufacturer contact information on-hand, and be skeptical of promises of unlimited hot water, and effortless long-lasting water heating, and saving money. The only folks saying this are the folks selling the product, and not their customers.

Fix most tankless gas water heaters yourself, same day, all brads for about $350.
http://waterheatertimer.org/How-to-install-gas-water-heater.html

Sep 21, 2011 | Bosch Water Heaters AquaStar 250SXO...

2 Answers

How can I wire a WH40 timer to a tankless water heater with 2 9kw elements? 240v 75amp 18kw. I do have # 8 AVG wire and 2 double breakers 40amp each. Tank you


You probably could but my question would be "why?" Water heater timers are made to turn power off to waterheaters during the times that we dont need hot water, like in the middle of the night or while you are at work. This keeps the hot water heater from working during those times and wasting energy (gas or electric). Tankless water heaters already have this builtin because they only work when you actuallty turn on the hot water. If the hot water faucet is not turned on, the tankless heater never comes on. It does not use a bit of energy until the hot water is actually turned on. So it will not be using energy during the night or while you are at work. So there really is no reason to do what you are thinking about unless you have another reason that I cant think of. Tankless heaters are great and this is why they save 60% of energy of conventional tank heaters.

Mar 27, 2011 | Intermatic WH40 - Water Heater Time Switch...

1 Answer

I have a reliance 501 gas hot water tank and i bought it in 1988 and it now has a leak at the bottom so i am going to have to replace it. but i never had any trouble with it until now so it lasted a long...


hot water heaters typically don't last most then 20 years or so. AO Smith used to sell glass lines tanks that lasted longer, but were fragile. Areas with acidic water, like the west coast, tend to go quicker.
The new tankless heaters cost more, but don't waste energy heating up water over night.
A large house may need more than one tankless however, because you don't want temperature variation when someone is taking a shower and someone else wants to do laundry or dishes.

Oct 09, 2010 | RELIANCE ELECTRIC WATER HEATER

3 Answers

Water turns cold very quickly


I had the EXACT same problem (installed my tankless last winter and worked fine, now this summer it fluctuates, have to turn the shower completely off and then on again to get any hot water and then it only lasts for a couple of minutes!) Argh - it is frustrating!

Here's what I found: the demand for hot water is lower during the summer (hot) months because the "cold" water coming in is already quite warm. You don't need as much hot water to make the shower temp comfortable. SO, my tankless was shutting off due to low flow demand. I've removed the flow restrictor from my shower head and it helped alot but didn't completely solve the prob. Next step is what has been recommended to me by several people but is much more expensive - change the pressure valve on your shower to a temperature valve. Or just wait til winter and it should work ok again :)

Jul 06, 2010 | Bosch & Tankless LP Hot Water Heater

1 Answer

No water coming out of faucet,well water


Check power to well pump, isolation valve is open, faulty pressure switch. If only one faucet you have a plugged screen on the end of the faucet

Sep 26, 2009 | Bosch & Tankless LP Hot Water Heater

1 Answer

Tankless Water Heater - Frozen???


I had them same problem with my AquaStar 125 back in 2005......it hasn't been that could around here since then until last night and it froze up again. The problem is the negative draft. This can be solved with the Power Vent Module and the AQ1 flapper....at least with the 125. It prevents the back drafts.

Dec 21, 2008 | Water Heaters

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