Question about Nikon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Instruction manual for settings on a Nikon F2?

I need an instruction manual for a Nikon F2.
How do I set the ISO/ film speed?
Is the apperture set by the lens ring?
Is the shutter speed the dial on the top?
What are the other buttons on the front for?
What are the T and L for either side of the shutter release button?
Can anyone help?

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 48 Answers

Set the film speed with the dial on top of the Photomic unit. Lift the chrome ring and turn so that the film speed is next to the little red arrow.
Yes, the aperture is set by the lens ring. And if you have one of the older finders which uses the prong meter connection, whenever you mount a lens you must turn the aperture ring all the way to the highest number, then back to the lowest number. For old-timers, this is known as the "Nikon twist". It tells the meter system what the widest aperture of the lens is so that it can measure light properly at full aperture.
Yes, the shutter speed is set by the dial on top. The Photomic meter sits on top of it, so you read the shutter speed from the scale on the side of the Photomic dial by the mark on the back.
The other buttons on the front are the lens release button (left side as you hold the camera), DOF preview (button just under shutter release), mirror lock-up (lever ring around DOF button) and self-timer (long lever at bottom).
The T-L ring serves to protect the shutter release from accidental push. If you lift the ring and turn the mark to L, the shutter release is Locked. If you lift and turn to T, it prepares the shutter for Time operation, where the shutter remains open when released without holding the button down as you do at the B speed setting.

Finally, the most help: you can download the manual for free (donation requested, and worth it) at http://www.butkus.org/chinon/nikon/nikon_f2_photomic/nikon_f2_photomic.htm

Posted on Feb 09, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

How to set asa on nikon 5005


If the film has the DX coding on the can then the camera automatically sets the film speed. If the can is not coded then the camera automatically sets the ASA/ISO to 100, and there is no way to override this.
If you need a manual, you may download one here.

Mar 05, 2012 | Instant Cameras

1 Answer

I have a Nikon F601 and I put a 400 iso film recently and I sort of didnt know how to load it on properly so I pressed the shutter release button as I loaded it twice when youre only suppose to press it...


Remove the lense, or the film if you're willing to waste it, and check to be sure the shutter blades aren't damaged. It'll be fairly evident if they are. If they are, the camera is pretty much now a paperweight. I hate to tell you that - but shutter replacements are VERY expensive and parts for most of these models no longer available from Nikon.

If that is not the issue, set the mode dial to M and try to take a shot. If that also doesn't work, either the batteries are exhausted or there is an internal issue in the camera. At this point, try new batteries. If that also gets you nowhere, you'll need to seek a reputable service tech, either through Nikon directly, locally if you can find one, or online/mail-order. If you have to go mail-order/online I'd recommend KEH Camera out of Atlanta, GA. They are very reasonable, have decent turn around, and do good work - but expect at least 1 month without your camera.

In M(anual) mode, be sure the lense is also set to M, via the switch on the front of the camera near the lense mount. You're not worrying about the quality of the image, only if the camera will take one. In manual mode, the light meter and other functions will have NO bearing on anything the camera does or doesn't do. At this point the meter reads out only for your information for you to set the settings yourself. The batteries do everything else - firing the shutter, driving the motor, etc.

Jul 21, 2011 | Nikon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

My Pentax IQZoom 115v overexposes every shot for that lovely "washed out" look we all hate. I only use Kodak slide film ASA 100. I've used IQZoom 900 cameras for decades with excellent results....


First, here's a link to a free download of your camera's manual in case you've lost yours.

On page 16 of the manual, it states that in addition to using DX film of ISO 100 to ISO 400:

1) Color negative film is recommended.
2) Non-DX film cannot be used - but then says if it is used, set the film to ISO 100.
3) ISO 400 film is recommended.

Page 25 and forward detail exposure Modes. This should be your next area of interest in the manual. If you are unable to to solve the problem at this point, there may be an issue with the aperture of the lens being stuck open - or the shutter remaining open for too long. Either way, it will probably need to be serviced professionally to get it working again. You might consider replacing this camera as repair costs may exceed the value of the camera.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply - thank you.

Mar 21, 2011 | Pentax Instant Cameras

1 Answer

I recently bought a nikon f2. After I bought a battery (single 3 volt as recommended by the person at batteries plus) I opened the battery compartment, with the positive pole pointing out, closed the...


The Nikon F2 for me is the best mechanical film camera ever produced. The only electrical or battery- dependent part is its metering. Meaning to say, even without batteries, the F2 should work and take pictures on all shutter speeds. Most probably, the F2 that you bought has a non-working photomic meter finder due to a defective ring resistor, a part that is usually the first thing that would fail on this camera. What, then, are your options? One, have the meter fixed by a competent manual camera technician. Two, buy a working Photomic finder and replace what you have. Three, buy or use a handheld meter. Four (the least expensive), use the sunny 16 rule. As added reference, here's a link that might help enlighten you more about how the F2 metering works: http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/hardwares/classics/nikonf2/prisms/dp11/index.htm

Mar 07, 2011 | Nikon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

How do i take 12 dark, 12 light and 12 perfect pictures with 400 black and white film on a vivitar 3800n camera?


For normal exposure, set the ISO dial to 400. Meter normally, adjusting the shutter speed and/or lens aperture until the green LED in the center lights up.

For dark pictures, you want to underexpose about two stops. One way is to meter as above, then stop down the aperture two stops (larger F/numbers) or increase the shutter speed two stops (larger number) or a combination of the two. Alternatively, set the ISO dial to 1600 and meter normally.

For light pictures, you want to overexpose about two stops. Meter normally then open up the lens two stops (smaller F/numbers) or slow the shutter speed two stops (smaller numbers) or a combination. Alternatively, set the ISO dial to 100 and meter normally.

You can also experiment. Over/underexpose one stop, then two, then three, then four, and even five. You might want to take a notebook with you and write down what you're doing. Record both the setting and how many stops over/under it is. When you get the film back, you can refer to your notes and see what happened.

Jan 25, 2011 | Vivitar Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Is there a way to turn off the flash?


The flash is automatic, you cannot control the flash. But you can put some black tape over the flash if you really don't want flash. Remember though, if the camera meter decides flash is needed, then your pictures could turn out dark/underexposed by covering the flash.

The manual can be found here: http://www.olympus-europa.com/consumer/208_manuals.cfm?prodID=P_N1246352

The manual says use 100, 200 or 400 iso films.

Maybe try high iso film like 800 iso or 1600 iso, best to try this out ahead of time to make sure you are satisfied with the results. The high iso films need less light so should perform better without flash, but the camera may not be able to rate these films correctly, trial and error is definitely required.

Oct 22, 2010 | Olympus TRIP AF 60 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

I need a nikon n55 instruction manual


You can download a manual from http://www.butkus.org/chinon/nikon.htm

Jan 27, 2010 | Nikon N55 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

What type of type of 120 film should i use in my ansco titan?


You can use any 120 film in your Ansco. The ideal choice will depend on your intended use. As the selection of such film is dwindling, you may find your choice largely made by what is available.The manual for your camera is available at < http://www.cameramanuals.org/agfa_ansco/ansco_titan_20.pdf>. You will need a light meter, or be willing to learn how to estimate exposure. Google for "sunny 16" which is an old rule of thumb asserting that you can set the shutter speed to the film ISO number and the aperture to F16 for photos in direct sun.

Oct 15, 2009 | Instant Cameras

1 Answer

FILM DOOR WILL NOT OPEN on nikon f2


The F2 has a door knob on the bottom cover. Flip out the handle and rotate it counter clockwise to open.

Apr 07, 2009 | Nikon Instant Cameras

1 Answer

Bronica AE II E Finder Owners Manual


Since I never use a TTL flash with my Bronica's, I'll give you my suggestion for a great solution. Using your TTL Metz flash, (make sure you've connected the TTL cord for Bronica ETRsi) take 8 shots at different apertures on A (Automatic), then take 8 shots at different apertures on M (Manual). I realize this will waste one 120 roll of film, but one negative will stand out as your perfect exposure. Yes, whenever you reduce the ISO in half, your basically overexposing the film by one f/stop. Just remember that this overexposes everything your shooting from foreground to background. With flash, this may cause your highlights to wash out, but any good lab could print for the highlights and make the background go darker. I used to shoot Vericolor at ISO 125 instead of it's rated ISO of 160. 
Fotobean

Jan 21, 2009 | Bronica ETR-Si Medium Format Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Instant Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

194 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon Instant Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96372 Answers

JOHN TOPLISS

Level 2 Expert

135 Answers

Ric Donato

Level 2 Expert

225 Answers

Are you a Nikon Instant Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...