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Main board won't power up

I have an a7s333 main board that will not power up. The atx power supply and power switch are fine. When the atx power is first turned on, when the power switch is pressed the board poweres for a moment, there is an audiable click and it loses power. Nothing will hapen after this unless the atx powere is turned off and on again. I had a quick look and don't see any burnt or swollen capacitors but i have not checked them. i have a ms6390 msi mo bo nothing comming up on screen at all no beep either like there used to be when the screen use to start thanks for any help brian

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  • Kim Tyler May 11, 2010

    does clearing the bios help??

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You may need to reset your processor and heatsink. Sometimes the thermal gel between the processor and the hearsink will evaporate over time and cause this problem. Try appling more thermal grease, reseat the processor.heatsink and try again, (When you do this, also clear your BIOS setting by using the Clear BIOS jumper and remove the CMOS battery for 3 to 5 minutes. Replace all prior to restart.) Good Luck.

Posted on Feb 03, 2009

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I have a IBM net vista and the power button does not work


That IBM Netvista should have a model number on the back.

This tells me if the computer is so old it uses an AT power supply, or an ATX power supply; as modern computers do.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

The old AT form factor of Power Supply, used the above type of main power cables.

The Power On switch was usually connected to the Power Supply.
A separate cable went from the front of the computer, connected to a Power On button, to the Power On switch on the Power Supply.

Or a separate Power On switch was mounted to the Power Supply, and a metal rod pushed against it.
The metal rod pushed by a plastic Power On button, in the front of the computer.

The ATX form factor design uses a Soft Power On circuit.

When a Power Supply is plugged into power, there is a constant 5 Volts present.
The 5 Volt Standby Power.

The ATX power on switch is a Momentary Contact Switch.
Pressing it closes the Soft Power On circuit -> Temporarily.

The 5 Volt Standby power is re-routed, and 'excites' the Power Supply, which turns it on.

THIS type of ATX power on switch is common.
It is inside the plastic Power On button assembly,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

Regards,
joecoolvette

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_power_supply

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/181

Apr 07, 2013 | IBM Computers & Internet

1 Answer

REPLACED POWER SUPPLY AND MOTHER BROAD AND STILL CANT GET IT TOO POWER UP


I need you to check something first.
I'm going to get detailed here to explain;

1) The Dell Dimension 1100 (B110) uses a 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The above is a STANDARD pinout for the wires going into a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector.

For a time period Dell had parts made for their computers, that were PROPRIETARY.
(All pre-built computer manufacturers have their computer parts made by somebody else)

They were Proprietary, in that the STANDARD guidelines for desktop computers was NOT followed.
They had the wires changed around for the 20-pin ATX main power cable.

They also had the pins in the 20-pin ATX main power connector, on the motherboard, changed also.
Means if you plug in an aftermarket Power Supply, it may toast the motherboard, Processor, Ram Memory, Harddrive, graphics card, (IF used), and so on.

Fun stuff huh?
Dell changed from being Proprietary as far as I know.

However you computer may fall into the old proprietary parts.
You need to compare the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, of the old Power Supply, TO the new Power Supply's 20-pin ATX main power cable connector.

SEE if those wires (Color code) are going into the same socket holes, as the old one.
Look at the Lock on the side, and use it for the key.

In the Standard 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector, Number 1 pin is the Orange wire, and on the side OPPOSITE of the Lock.
Number 11 wire is also Orange, but is on the same side as the Lock.

Now you have the key, check out the old Power Supply's 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector.
Same color of wires going into the proper socket holes in the main power cable's connector?

Whew! Good! Let's go on.

You need to get the Power Supply going.

Bypass the Power On switch.

IF, you bypass the Power On switch, and the Power Supply comes on, you have a bad $5 Power On switch.

IF you bypass the Power On switch, and the Power Supply does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply.

Test has NOTHING to do directly with the Power On switch, or it's wires.
A jumper wire is used on the Soft Power On pin, TO ANY Black wire, in the 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

Looking back at the 20-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The GREEN wire is the Soft Power On wire.
A-N-Y Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

(The power wires are Positive wires. ALL Black wires are Negative wires )

The preferred jumper wire is a paper clip.
Straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.
The top of the U is wrapped a few times with black plastic electrical tape.
This taped area is for your fingers and thumb to hold onto.

Turn the U-shape upside down, and the 'Legs' are what you are going to use.
One leg goes down into a socket hole with the Green wire.
The other leg goes down into ANY socket hole that has a Black wire in it.

The 'Leg' of the jumper wire goes RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire in the socket hole.
Where the wires go down into the connector of the 20-pin ATX main power cable, is the BACK.
The 20-pin ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard, as shown in the photo to the far right, in the Playtool link.

The jumper wire goes down into the Back of the connector, and into the two socket holes named above.
The jumper wire MUST go far enough down into the socket hole of the connector, to go PAST the insulation of the wire, AND touch the metal terminal at the end of the wire.

All wires going into the main power cable's connector, end in a metal terminal,

http://www.molex.com/molex/products/datasheet.jsp?part=active/0002081202_CRIMP_TERMINALS.xml&channel=Products&Lang=en-US

The left side is the Back, and the part that get's crimped on the insulation of the wire. The right side is the Front.
The Front of those Molex metal terminals can be seen in the center photo, of the Playtool link.

Contact made is no more than 2 seconds.
(The Power On switch is A Momentary Contact Switch)

Get the Power Supply going, then post back in a Comment, as to the results.

(Also make SURE the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable is plugged in,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is power for the Processor, and sometimes forgotten. NO, it has nothing to do with why the Power Supply does not come on. Just wanted to add.

This is where it plugs into the motherboard,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim1100/EN/SM/techov.htm#wp1061217

Processor and heatsink connector (J2E1) is where the Processor sits.
Processor power connector (J5B1) is where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in )

May I also ask why a new Power Supply was purchased, and a new motherboard?
Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 19, 2012 | Dell Dimension 1100 PC Desktop

1 Answer

My computer will not turn on and i was told something is wrong with the motherboard. How do i fix this?


Your computer, Dell Dimension E521 Desktop PC, will not turn on, and someone told you the problem is the motherboard?

Unless you stated to this entity, that you spotted leaking Electrolytic Capacitors on the motherboard, how can they assume this?

I believe you should check whether the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply.

1) The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button. It is an ATX power on switch. (The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch )

This is an example of an ATX power on switch, that I have found fits many desktop computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The test to perform bypasses the Power On switch. It does NOT involve the Power On switch itself, however.

Bypassing the Power On switch turns the computer (Power Supply) on?
Problem is the Power On switch.

Bypassing the Power On switch does NOT turn the computer (Power Supply) on?
The problem is the Power Supply.

A) Computer on a table, computer unplugged from power, computer case open.
I would then lay the computer on it's side, on a towel, on the table, computer case opening UP.
Watch the cables attached to the computer.

This is so you can access the components inside of the computer more easily. This will become apparent in a moment.
Now follow Anti-Static Precautions.

Anti-Static Precautions:
Your body carries Static electricity. Static WILL fry out (Short Circuit) the delicate hardware components inside a computer.
Relieve your body of Static BEFORE reaching inside the computer.

(Have to restate) Computer on a table, computer unplugged from power, computer case open.
TOUCH an unpainted surface, of the metal frame of the open computer case.
This action will relieve your body of Static.

Should you leave your computer in the middle of working on it, (For ANY reason), be SURE to touch the metal frame again upon your return.

Now you are safe, and the computer is safe. Let's begin;

Inside your computer there is a power cable coming from the Power Supply, that plugs into the motherboard. This power cable I'm referring to is the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

This is an example of a 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Female connector on motherboard shown in the Left photo.
Power cable connector shown in the middle photo.

The photo to the right shows the ATX main power cable plugged into the motherboard.
This is how it needs to be for the test. It also shows the color of the various wires going into it.
We only need to be concerned with Two wires.

The Green wire, and ANY Black wire.

The Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. It is also abbreviated as PS_ON.
ANY Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

A jumper wire is used to BRIEFLY connect the Green wire, to ANY Black wire.
(Again, the Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch)

The jumper wire preferred to use is a paper clip. The paper clip is straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.
Look at the U-shape upside down. The top/middle is wrapped a few times with black plastic electrical tape. This is for your fingers, and thumb to hold onto.

The 'legs' of the U-shape go down into the Back of the ATX main power cable's connector.
(I shortened 24-pin ATX main power cable to ATX main power cable)

Look at the photo to the right. See how the Green wire goes down into a squarish socket hole?
Look at the photo in the middle. See the metal tube shapes at the Front of the connector?
Brass looking, slightly square?

These are metal terminals. There is a metal terminal for every wire, going down into the ATX main power cable connector.

The 'leg' of the U-shape jumper wire goes down into the Back of the connector (ATX main power cable connector), RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wire that is in the socket hole.

It has to go down into the squarish socket hole far enough, to pass by the insulation of the wire, and Touch the metal terminal.

Example:
One leg of the U-shape goes down into the socket hole of the Green wire, right next to the Green wire, and touches the metal terminal.

The other leg of the U-shape goes down into a socket hole, with ANY Black wire, and touches the metal terminal pin.

The leg MUST touch the metal terminal pin.

The contact made is brief. No more than 2 seconds. (1001,..1002)

Shock warning. None.
The Soft Power On wire (Green wire) has 5 Volts DC going through it.
In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

HOWEVER, there may be a spark, as both legs of the U-shape jumper wire touch their respective metal terminals. Warning you in advance.

You are also holding onto the black plastic electrical tape. (One wrap of black plastic electrical tape will insulate you from 600 Volts DC)

IF, the jumper wire turns the computer on, (Power Supply actually), the problem is a bad Power On switch.

IF, the jumper wire does Not turn the computer on, the problem is a bad Power Supply.

The Power Supply used in a Dell Dimension E521 Desktop PC, is an ATX (Form Factor) power supply.

The form factor ATX for a Power Supply refers to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case, and the power cables provided with the Power Supply.

The size, and shape of the ATX power supply case is approximately 6 inches Wide (Width), 5-1/2 inches Long (Length), and 3-1/2 inches Tall. (Height)

With the power cables offered with today's offering of ATX power supply's, there is no need to be concerned if the ATX power supply in question, has the needed power cables.

ATX power supply's sold now, have the correct power cables you'll need, and the correct amount of power cables.

This is just one example of an ATX power supply that will work,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1389575&CatId=1078

Scroll down to the bold heading - Detailed Features
Look at the chart under the subheading - Connectors

Note the first connector shown. This is a 20-pin plus a 4-pin main power cable.
Both power cables are used for your 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on your motherboard.

This gives a little more information on a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

Note the photo to the right. This particular motherboard has a 20-pin ATX main power cable connector. It does not require the additional 4-pin power cable.
Yours does.

Do Not confuse the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, with the 4-pin power cable that comes with a 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

The 4-pin power cable you need is in the harness of wires, for the 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.

There WILL be a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable, however. This is an example of a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

(Color of the connectors for any power cable, does Not matter. They can be any color)

Dell Support > Dimension E521 Desktop PC > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dime521/en/SM_EN/index.htm

In the list click on - Technical Overview
Now click on - System Board Components

22 is where the 24-pin ATX main power cable plugs in.

(NOTE*
The 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, and the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable connector, have a Lock on the side. The plastic rectangle on the side of the connector/s.
This Lock has a hook on the bottom end. The end that faces the motherboard.
The hook goes over a Tab on the female connector, on the motherboard.

The Lock acts like a see-saw on a playground. The top of the Lock is squeezed in. This action brings the hooked end away, from the Tab on the motherboard female connector.
Then the power cable CONNECTOR is wiggled, and removed from the female motherboard connector.

{ ONLY use the Connector when removing it. DO NOT pull on the wires)

2 points to where the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable plugs in.
That's it for the Power Supply power cables.

1 points to where the Processor Fan plugs into.
5 and 6, point to where the Data cables from the SATA harddrive, and SATA optical drives, plug into.
(This is if the Dimension E521 has SATA optical drives, and not IDE { PATA} optical drives)

[ The SATA data cable connector has 7 contact pins in it. It is the shorter connector.
The SATA power cable has 15 pins in it. It is the longer connector.

IF, the SATA harddrive has a provision for using a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin Peripheral power cable (Mislabeled as Molex), ONLY use just the SATA power cable. Otherwise the SATA harddrive will burn out. Sometimes not right away, but eventually it does ]

Going back to the main page for the Service Manual, click on -
Removing and Installing Parts.

Removing the Computer Cover is listed, as well as Power Supply.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Nov 03, 2011 | Dell Dimension E521 PC Desktop

1 Answer

How do I get a Compac Presario S6500NX to power on?


If the Compaq doesn't power on with the Power On switch, bypass the Power On switch.
This test will also tell you whether the Power On switch is bad, or the Power Supply.

1) First I suggest you check THAT receptacle IN the surge protector, that the computer is plugged into.

I have had a few surge protectors where just THAT receptacle was bad.


"Hmmm, surge protector power on LED light is lit.
Monitor, printer, and router have power, and they're plugged into the surge protector."

Upon plugging a lamp into THAT receptacle in the surge protector, that the computer was plugged into, proved that receptacle to be bad.

2) To bypass the Power On switch:

A) If you bypass the Power On switch, and the computer turns on, (Power Supply turns on), you have a bad Power On switch.

The Power On switch is located INSIDE, the plastic Power On button.
This is an example of a generic ATX Power On switch,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

B) If you bypass the Power On switch, and the computer does not come on, the Power Supply is bad.
Replace.
This you can do yourself easily. More on this later.

You won't be touching the wires of the Power On switch.
You will be addressing the power wires in the 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's connector.

This is a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and the connector on the end of the cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The Compaq Presario S6500NX uses a 20-pin ATX main power cable.

This is HP Support > Compaq Presario S6500NX desktop computer > Specifications > Motherboard Specifications,

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00063254&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&lang=en&product=390429

I would like you to scroll down to the illustration of the motherboard, (Asus A7V8X-LA), and to the photo of the motherboard underneath the illustration.

{By the way. If you look at the photo of the Compaq Presario S6500NX at the top right of the page, you will see it isn't accurate. Shows the computer case to be almost square shaped. NOT}

Looking at the motherboard illustration view the Ram Memory slots.
They are marked as DDR DIMM 1 (64 bit, 184-pin module), and DDR DIMM 2 (64 bit, 184-pin module)

To the right is the 20-pin ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard. It is marked as ATX Power Connector.

Matching it up on the photo, it is the white rectangular connector that has two columns of square socket holes.
10 socket holes per column. 20 total.

When you open your computer case, you will see the ATX main power cable plugged into this white connector.
It will look similar to the photo at the far right in the above Playtool link.

To bypass the Power On switch you will use a jumper wire, to briefly connect the Green wire, and ANY Black wire.

The Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. (PS_ON)
ANY Black wire you see is a Ground wire.

Use a paper clip straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.
The middle of the U-shape is wrapped with electrical tape.
This is where you hold the jumper wire.

The voltage is 5 Volts DC.
Two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.
As you can see it isn't a large voltage at all.
You may wish to don a glove on the hand holding the jumper wire.

There may, or may not, be a spark when you make contact with the jumper wire.
Want you to feel safe.
(1 wrap of electrical tape is good enough for 600 Volts DC. Just wanted you to know. Wrap the U-shape jumper wire thick enough so it is easily held by your finger, and thumb)

The jumper wire goes down into the socket hole with the power wire. Goes down right next to the plastic insulation of the wire, and down into the socket hole.

At the end of every power wire going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, is a metal terminal connector. (Female)
The insulation of the power wire goes down into the socket hole pretty deep.

You need to ensure that the jumper wire touches the metal terminal. The jumper wire has to go down in the socket hole until it touches the metal terminal connector.

On end of the jumper wire goes down in the Green wire's socket hole.
The other end of the wire goes down into ANY Black wire's socket hole.

The contact is brief. Works on the same principle as the Power On switch.
The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch.
Touch for no more than two seconds, lift the jumper wire out of the socket holes.

Computer comes on?
Bad Power On switch.

Computer does not come on?
Bad Power Supply.

The Power Supply used in a Compaq Presario S6500NX is an ATX power supply.
(It's also a SMPS if you want to get technical.
Switched-Mode Power Supply)

Uses the ATX Form Factor.
The form factor used by MANY personal computers.
Very readily available.

[ATX Form Factor for a Power Supply's case, is the size, and shape of the case.
Approximately 6 inches Long, 6 inches Wide, and 3-1/2 inches Tall]

It's a 250 Watt power supply, and is a generic unit.
Probably made by Bestec, Delta, or the like.
Maximum rate Wattage is stated at 250 Watts.
Actual maximum wattage for a Power Supply made in this time period, is more like 60 to 70 percent of what is stated.
150 Watts to 175 Watts.

The power cables needed will be supplied with the new Power Supply's.
New power supply's have an ATX main power cable that can be used as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

They will also come with a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
(Usually described by the seller as a P4 12V power cable, or P4 MB)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This is one example of a Power Supply that has enough Wattage, correct Form Factor, and correct power cables,

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1621514&CatId=1078

Information on how to replace a Power Supply,

1) http://www.fonerbooks.com/r_power.htm

2) http://support.gateway.com/support/manlib/cmponts/process/8508750/08750c01.htm

From me:
Power unplugged from computer, be SURE to follow Anti-Static Precautions BEFORE reaching inside a computer.

Anti-Static Precautions:
Your body carries Static electricity.
Static will fry out (Short Circuit) the hardware components inside a computer.

To relieve your body of Static:
Computer unplugged from power, computer case open, TOUCH the metal frame of the open computer case.

If you get up, and walk away from your computer in the middle of working on it, be SURE to touch the metal frame again upon your return.

For questions please post in a Comment.

Sep 26, 2010 | Compaq Presario S6500NX (DQ181A#ABA) PC...

1 Answer

My desktop computer wont power on


Suggest you see if the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply.

(First check to see if the receptacle in the surge protector, that the computer is plugged into, has power.
Have had a few bad surge protectors, where just THAT receptacle was bad.

"Hmmm, surge protector power on LED light is lit. Monitor, printer, and router have power, that are plugged into the surge protector.

Plugged a lamp into THAT receptacle, and found it to be bad)

To test whether the Power On switch, or the Power Supply is bad, a jumper wire is used to bypass the Power On switch.

[ The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button.
This is an example of a generic ATX Power On switch, that I have found fits many computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html ]

The jumper wire is used on the 20, or 24-pin ATX main power cable's connector.
While still plugged into the motherboard.

The jumper wire connects to the Soft Power On wire, (Green), and to any Ground wire. (Black)

Example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Example of a 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Using the jumper (Wire) to bypass the Power On switch, turns the Power Supply on?
The problem is a bad Power On switch.

Using the jumper to bypass the Power On switch, does Not turn the Power Supply on?
The problem is a bad Power Supply.

There is a correct procedure for performing this test.
Post back in a Comment if you wish to know.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 20, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My computer will not turn on.


Suggest you start with checking the receptacle in the surge protector, that the Computer is plugged into.

I have had 3 surge protectors now that just THAT receptacle was bad.

"Hmmm, surge protector LED power on light is lit.
Monitor, printer, and router, plugged into the surge protector have power."
Plugging in a lamp into the receptacle in the surge protector, that the computer was plugged into, proved just THAT receptacle was bad.

Not an issue?

Then I suggest you check to see if the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply.

The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button.
This is an example of a generic ATX Power On switch,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The test is to use a jumper wire for the Soft Power On, and bypass the Power On switch.

If the Power Supply comes on, the problem is the Power On switch.
If the Power Supply does Not come on, the problem is the Power Supply.
Bad Power Supply.

Dell Support, and the Service Manual main page, for the Dimension E310,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim3100/en/sm/index.htm

If you click on Technical Overview, then on System Board Components, you'll be taken to this page,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim3100/en/sm/techov0.htm#wp1058089

Here you will see an illustration of your motherboard. This is a Top view. The view you will see when you open your computer case.
(Main menu - Removing the Computer Cover)

The number 9 points to the ATX main power connector on the motherboard.
Viewing closely you will count 24 socket holes.
12 on top, 12 on bottom.

This connector is a 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

If you scroll down the page to the heading - Power Supply DC Connector Pin Assignments, and to the heading underneath - DC Power Connector P1, you will see the Dimension E310 has a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

This is a more in-depth view of a typical 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector, plus a view of a typical 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on a motherboard,
(Not a Dell Dimension E310),

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

The photo to the far Left, shows a 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on a typical motherboard.
There is no 24-pin ATX main power cable plugged in.

The photo in the middle, shows a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The photo to the far Right shows the 24-pin ATX main power cable plugged into the connector.

In the photo to the far Right you will see that one of the power wires has Green insulation.
This is the Soft Power On wire.
Also abbreviated as PS_ON

You will see many wires with Black insulation.
ALL of these wires are a Ground wire.

The jumper wire is connected to the Soft Power On wire, (Green), and to ANY Ground wire. (Black)

The method is to insert one end of a jumper wire, into the socket hole with the Green wire, and the other end into a socket hole with a Ground wire.
(ANY Ground wire)

Again looking at the photo to the far Right, you will see that the power wires go down into individual socket holes.
The insulation of the power wires goes down into the socket hole pretty far.

At the end of each power wire is a metal terminal. It is a female terminal.
This is what it looks like,

http://www.alliedelec.com/search/productdetail.aspx?SKU=8630463

The jumper wire must go down into the socket hole, (Right next to the existing wire already in the socket hole), far enough to touch that metal terminal pin.

it has been suggested to use a paper clip.
The paper clip is straightened out, then bent into a U shape.
The center of the U shape is wrapped with black electrical tape.

The taped area is where you hold the 'jumper wire'
You may wish to wear a glove also.

The voltage is 5 Volts DC.
Two D cell flashlight batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

There may be a spark.
Hence I advised wearing a glove. Not so much for your safety, but for your peace of mind.

One end down into the socket hole with the Green wire, (Soft Power On), and the other end down into ANY socket hole with a Black (Ground) wire.

The contact period used is no longer than 2 seconds.

If the Power Supply comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.
If the Power Supply does Not come on, you have a bad Power Supply.

The Power Supply can come on, and still be bad. Weak voltage power rail.
Enough power to light LED lights, and perhaps spin fans, but not enough to turn the Processor on.

1) ALL of the LED lights combined, use less than 1 Watt of power.
2) EACH fan uses 2 to 3 Watts
3) A typical Processor can use 51 to 125 Watts.

Post additional questions in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 13, 2010 | Dell Dimension E310 PC Desktop

1 Answer

PC was caught in a lightning storm, and now will not boot (only at random). It seems like it's not getting power, when it does it'll boot normally. But when the storm hit my LAN was disabled and I had to...


Test whether it is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply. Since the LAN card bit the dust, you may be looking at a worse problem, though.

Bypass the Power On switch.

If the Power Supply comes on, the problem is the switch.
[One generic ATX Power On switch, that I have found fits many computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

If the Power Supply does not readily come on, the problem is the Power Supply.

To bypass the Power On switch, you will be using a jumper wire on the
24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

Looks like this,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

(Not necessarily the same color, and isn't located in the same position on your motherboard, as shown in the link)

Motherboard orientation:
Processor to the top, Ram Memory slots to the right.

The 24-pin ATX main power cable connector on the motherboard, is to the near right, of the number 4 Ram Memory slot.

In case you do not have the Owner's Manual, for your Inspiron 530 desktop computer,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/inspd530/en/index.htm

On this page left-click on -
Owner's Manual - View - Download - (HTML 3.44MB)

Left-click on - Removing and Installing Parts
Left-click on - System Board Components
(System Board = Motherboard)

Number 7 - main power connector (ATX_POWER), is the
24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on your motherboard.

Referring back to the Playtool link, you will see a wire with Green insulation on it.
This is the Soft Power On wire. (PS_ON)

A jumper wire is used to connect it to ANY Black wire.
ALL Black wires are Ground wires.

[This is a DC circuit. There is a Positive, and a Negative.
A Ground wire is a Negative wire.

The green Soft Power On wire, is a positive wire containing 5 Volts.
You are completing a circuit.
The Soft Power On circuit.
You are bypassing the Power On switch]

There is no splicing of the wires to connect the jumper wire.
The jumper wire will go down into the socket holes, of the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

One end of the jumper wire goes down into the socket hole, containing the green Soft Power On wire.
The other end of the jumper wire goes down into a socket hole, with ANY Black wire.

The 24-pin ATX main power cable, is connected to the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, on the motherboard.
Just as shown in the photo to the far right on the Playtool link.

The back of the 24-pin ATX main power cable's connector, is where the wires come in.
(The front of the power cable's connector is plugged into the motherboard)

I use a jumper wire that is approximately 3 inches long. (7.62cm)
An insulated wire. Both ends of the insulated wire are stripped of insulation, approximately 1/2 inch. (1.27cm)

One bare end of the jumper wire, goes down into the socket hole of the Green wire. Right next to the wire.
It has to go pretty far down in there.

At the end of each power wire, going into the 24-pin ATX main power cable connector, is a metal terminal pin. (Actually is a round hollow metal pin)
The jumper wire's bare end Must touch that metal pin.

The other end of the jumper wire, goes down into ANY socket hole with a Black wire.
(ALL Black wires are Ground wires)

Power Supply (Computer) plugged into power, the jumper wire is inserted.
The contact is a very BRIEF one. No more than 2 seconds.
(The Power On switch is a Momentary Contact Switch)

I suggest you also check the 12 Volt power rail. Check it with everything plugged in, inside the computer, and the computer on.
You need the Power Supply to have a load to get an accurate test.

There are 3 Voltage power rails in the Inspiron SMPS.
(Switched-Mode Power Supply, or just Power Supply for short)

A) The 3.3 Volt power rail
B) The 5 Volt power rail
C) The 12 Volt power rail.

The main one to check is the 12 Volt power rail.
[Orange wires are 3.3 Volt.
Red wires are 5 Volt.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt ]

The Positive (Red probe lead of the multimeter, is connected to any Yellow wire, coming out of the Power Supply.
The Negative (Black) probe lead of the multimeter, is connected to any Black (Ground) wire.

See if there is an unused standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.
It has 1 Red wire, 1 Yellow wire, and two Black wires.
Connect to the Yellow wire, and to one of the Black wires.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

[Multimeter function set to DC Volts. If it has it, set it to the 0 to 50 Volt scale]

11 to 13 Volts is Okay, but I prefer the voltage to closer to 12.
11 Volts indicates it's time for a new Power Supply.

Jul 27, 2010 | Dell Inspiron 530 Desktop Computer

1 Answer

I have a dell dimention 5100 it was working fine this morning. But now i can turn it on.


Suggest you bypass the Power On switch with a jumper wire used on the Soft Power On of the Power Supply.

If the Power Supply comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.

If the Power Supply does Not come on, you have a bad Power Supply.

The Power On switch is located inside the plastic Power On button.
This is one generic Power On switch that I have found fits many computers,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The jumper wire is used on the 24-pin ATX main power cable.
This is an example of a 24-pin ATX main power cable, and it's connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

Dell Support > Dimension 5100 > Technical Overview > System Board Components,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim5100/en/sm/techov1.htm#wp1058472

The 24-pin ATX main power cable is plugged into the motherboard, as shown in the photo to the right, on the Playtool link.

The jumper wire is used to make a Momentary (Brief) contact, with the green wire, and ANY Black wire.

The Green wire is the Soft Power On wire.
ANY Black wire is a Ground wire.

There is a correct procedure for doing this.
The safety risk is very minimal.
The Soft Power On voltage is 5 Volts DC.
Two D cell batteries produce 3 Volts DC.

An insulated wire should be used. You may wish to wear a glove on the hand that connects the jumper wire, just for an added feeling of safety.

Should you wish to know the correct procedure, simply state so in a Comment. Believe upper right of your page.

Jun 24, 2010 | Dell Dimension 5100 (D51L1) PC Desktop

2 Answers

The on-off button will not turn the computer on. I shut it off last night using the "shut down" software sequence, clicking two sequential "shut down" icons and waiting for the machine to power off. What...


Yeah I have seen switches fail a few times, its rare though, trace the wire back to your motherboard and disconnect the lead, then short the pins. If it comes on replace the switch, if it doesnt reset the bios via a the jumper and try again, disconnect the long ATX cable from the mother board and all power connectors from peripheral devices and on the Long ATX connector that was connected to the motherboard you will see a green wire, connect your mains to the power supply and short the green wire on the ATX connector with the black wire next to it, the power supply should fire up, if it doesnt try a new power lead and outlet, if it still does not fire up its your powersupply. If however you power supply does power up you should reconnect everything and try your power switch and shorting power switch pins on motherboard again, if the power supply does not come on then yor motherboard should be replaced.

Jun 22, 2010 | Dell Dimension 5100 (D51L1) PC Desktop

1 Answer

My t3065 e machine was powered down manually 1 week ago when I got back to it to turn it on nothing happens, the power cord and wall plug are fine


Perhaps during the interlude that the eMachines wasn't being used, there was a power outage, or lightning struck nearby.

The first hardware component that I would check, would be the Power On switch, and Power Supply.

Bypass the Power On switch to see if the problem is the Power On switch, or the Power Supply.

If bypassing turns the Power Supply on, the problem is the Power On switch.

If bypassing does Not turn the Power Supply on, the problem is the Power Supply.

Inside the plastic Power On button, is a Power On switch.
It is a Momentary Contact Switch.

Below is one example of a Power On switch, I have found to fit many computers.

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

Bypassing is done with a jumper wire, inserted into the back of the 20/24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

The jumper wire Briefly, touches the Soft Power On wire (Green) terminal down in the connector, and ANY Ground terminal. (Black)

I listed 20/24-pin above, because I don't know if the T3065 uses a 20-pin ATX main power cable connector, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable connector.

Below is an example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's corresponding connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

The photo all the way to the Right, shows the back of the connector.
It is plugged into the motherboard.

The Front of the connector is plugged into the female socket on the motherboard.
The Back of the connector is shown, and this is the area the power wires go down into.

Here you can see the green Soft Power On wire.
ANY of those Black wires are Ground wires.

I have Not detailed this procedure yet.

Do Not attempt it until I do.

I want to know first, if you are interested in doing the procedure, and will also outline any safety issues involved.

Jun 04, 2010 | E-Machines T3065 PC Desktop

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