Question about MIG Welders

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Welding current traveling over electrical equipment grounds.

Electrical equipment grounds in extension cords are being fried.

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  • Anonymous Feb 21, 2009

    equipment grounds 12s are burning through emt

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  • 11 Answers

Are you saying that the Ground cable in your extention cables are overheating / melting the insulation

Posted on Feb 04, 2009

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Electrical wiring


The CP-300 and CP-200 were never designed to run on single phase. You can buy a 3-phase generator (see military surplus) or a phase converter. You will need a pretty big one - like one rated for 20hp to use the full potential of the welder. That is also pretty expensive - say $1000. However, if you have a shop, you can buy used 3-phase equipment sometimes significantly cheaper than 2-phase stuff. So you buy that expensive converter and save money on all the other equipment you will buy. Or sell it. Or scrap it - some older welders had big copper wound transformers - a few hundred bucks worth of copper.... some had aluminum though... Good luck.

Jul 08, 2013 | Miller matic 140 Mig Welding Package W/As...

1 Answer

Three phase power went through our single phase butters mig. no fan or torch now


Hi:

Sorry to say this but feeding 3 phase current to a single phase machine will fry the PC board.

You will need to send the machine to your nearest welding/maintenace shop.

May 19, 2011 | MIG Welders

1 Answer

How do you ignite a Lincoln Electric Welder???


You don't need an striker with a MIG welder just hook the ground cable to the base metal point the nozzle where you want to weld and pull the trigger and it will weld. Household current will run a MIG welder Take a look at the plug on the welder if it will pug into a 110v outlet you are all set, but most likely you will need a 220v outlet and maybe as much as an electric dryer type outlet. 

It takes a lot of practice to be a decent welder you also need to know what voltage and wire speed settings to use for a given thickness and type of material. 

You don't mention shielding gas, if you are using a flux core wire you don't need it, but if you are using regular wire you do. 

If I may make a suggestion, If you really want to learn how to weld, find a community college near you and take an introductory welding class. You will get a wealth of information and practice on different welding processes. The instructor will work with you and get you welding much better and faster than you will on your own. Most importantly you will get a lot of safety information.

This is a good introductory book:
http://www.amazon.com/Welders-Handbook-RevisedHP1513-Cutting-Oxyacetylene/dp/1557885133/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1

Mar 03, 2010 | Lincoln Electric LINK2400-+1 CV-305 MIG...

1 Answer

I have a Hobart handler 120/90amp wire feed welder.When i try to weld,all i get is a small spark.I turn it off,turn it on and it does it again.The wire feed works good,it just sparks,but will not keep...


I have welded countless hours with Linde & Lincoln & even a few Hobarts & the only time that I ever had the same problem was when the ground connection either to the object I was welding, or the welding cable ground wasn't good & clean & tight. Same on stick welders also. I did develop the habit of grinding not only where I was preparing to weld, but where I was placing my ground clamp & that always provided a better "frying bacon" sound as I went along the business of pushing a bead. In a welder, the only other thing than that is involved is the step-up transformer and your wire. Hope this helps.

Feb 01, 2010 | Hobart MIG Welders

1 Answer

Welder Motor runs , Gen works , welder won't excite and weld


A MIG welder is a complicated machine, unlike the stick welder. You can lose a lot of time if you must wait for someone else to fix the MIG. If you know basic troubleshooting for your welding machines, you can save a lot of time and a lot of money.
See if the wire is feeding properly. A worn drive roller can affect the feed and cause it to slip. When you're checking, look for debris and dirt on the liner. This can also cause bird nesting. Sometimes troubleshooting welding machines is as simple as cleaning it and allowing the wire to move freely.
  • Step 2 Look at the tip near the wire exit, inside of the gun. A worn out tip doesn't allow the electricity to efficiently hit and creates a lot more work on the job. Burn back can cause a bad wire.
  • Step 3 Clean the welding cup of the splatter. This task seems mundane, but troubleshooting welding machines usually involves clean components. Proper gas coverage cannot occur if the cup is plugged.
  • Step 4 Inspect the ground clamp. When this part is coated with oxides, electrons can't readily transfer. A bad ground **** can cause a lot of resistance and change the way that the current comes back to the machine.
  • Step 5 Examine the welding cable for worn spots. A badly worn can cause problems.
  • Step 6 Adjust the brake on the wire spool. Setting it too high or too low can cause problems with your machine operation.
  • Sometimes you can overlook the simplest things when you're troubleshooting welding machines, so always go from the simple to the more complex.
  • Always have a qualified electrician look at the parts on the inside of the machine.
  • Don't continually subject your MIG welder to thermal overload, which could cause permanent damage.
  • Oct 27, 2009 | MIG Welders

    3 Answers

    I have a clarke 130en mig with gas and it will not weld


    The most common problem is that people still try and run the welder with extension cords. 10 ft,25ft,50ft,100ft, these cords all drain and can't supply the energy needed as if you were to plug it straight into a wall outlet. well I don't have a plug outlet where my work is, I need a extention cord. The only solution for not having a handy outlet is a Generator. that will supply the necessary voltage needed to do the job. EXTENSION CORDS ARE A NO NO. also, always double check your ground.

    Hope this was helpful, please post a rating good or bad, thank you.

    May 02, 2009 | Clarke Power Products Clarke 130EN Mig 110...

    4 Answers

    Welding Dangerous


    Compared to other industrial jobs, welding is fairly dangerous. The occupational and health hazards of welding can be avoided with proper equipment, safe materials, and a few common sense measures. Risks associated with welding include asphyxiation due to dangerous inhalants, skin and eye damage due to ultraviolet light, electrical or chemical fires, and long-term negative effects from fumes. Most people think that sparks and arcs are the most dangerous aspects of welding because they call attention to themselves, but they are only one risk. The brightness of the sparks, with their strong UV light, can cause cancer in unprotected eyes and skin. Yet there is a wide range of equipment, such as auto-darkening helmets and thick gloves, to reduce your exposure. Also, sparks are not usually hot, yet general precautions should be taken to keep wood or other combustible material out of the range of the welder's arc. Setting heated metal on a flammable surface is more likely to start a fire. The leading cause of health problems in welders relates to carcinogenic or toxic chemicals. These chemicals might be in a sealant or coating over the metal surfaces to be welded. Extreme heat releases molecules into the air, where they are easily inhaled. Certain substances might also be embedded in the material itself, like lead, cadmium, manganese, chromium, or nickel in metals like stainless steel, copper, or zinc. These metals should only be welded with extreme caution. Make sure you know exactly what they contain and weld in an area with a lot of air circulation. Symptoms from inhalation can range from a temporary flu-like sickness to major damage to lungs, liver, and other organs. For instance, manganism from manganese exposure is related to Parkinson's Disease. Even when you are careful with regard to sealants and varieties of metals, the process of welding always produces other dangerous gases. For instance, a variation of oxygen called ozone is created with every welding arc. Ozone exists naturally in the atmosphere, but large concentrations of ozone displace oxygen. If you weld in an enclosed space, ordinarily safe gases can become too concentrated and cause edema, filling your lungs with water. Ozone, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide build up, making you pass out, hit your head, or suffer brain damage.

    Aug 27, 2008 | Astro Pneumatic 3 Pk. MIG Welder Torch Tip...

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