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My system doesn't set up windows-xp it previously took it but now it only take vista

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  • satyajit kar
    satyajit kar Feb 02, 2009

    yes the second one ,

    a problem screen appears after loading components of os.

  • satyajit kar
    satyajit kar Feb 02, 2009

    no it recognizes the cd-rom

    it creates error preventing setup ...........

  • satyajit kar
    satyajit kar Feb 02, 2009

    yes

  • satyajit kar
    satyajit kar Feb 02, 2009

    i will tell u latter i.e. seeing error report i will send u

  • Peter Steiert
    Peter Steiert May 11, 2010

    Could you tell us what the error reports?

  • Nouveau IT, LLC
    Nouveau IT, LLC May 11, 2010

    Are you trying to convert back to XP from Vista? (Was Vista the original os or XP?) Thanks

  • Peter Steiert
    Peter Steiert May 11, 2010

    I need some more information on this issue. What do you mean your system doesn't setup Windows XP? Do you mean your system doesn't recognize your Windows Installer CD-ROM, or is there some form of error preventing setup from installing Windows XP?

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Please let me know the full problem.. check for the boot.ini file ,and weather it shows both the operatng systems

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

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I can't delete any of the d drive even after restoring factory settings


Which operating system ?


some operating systems have part of there operating system stored in partitions which are protected other operating systems like Vista have partitions which have there recovery back up and also are protected



Sometimes there's no better way to repair a damaged Windows XP install than to start from scratch and reinstall the whole thing. It's a drastic move, but it is almost guaranteed to work. (Only serious hardware issues or incorrectly installed files can cause errors in this case.) If all other options have been exhausted, and your computer still won't function correctly, fear not: After a reinstall it should be running as good as new.

Locate an XP install disk, preferably the one that came with the computer, and any other software packages and drivers. Most of the time these will come packaged with the computer at the time of purchase. To save your data, copy information in your "My Documents" folder and any other important data you might have stored on the hard drive to a flash drive, CD or an external hard drive. Insert the XP install disk into the computer's CD drive and reboot the computer. The computer should automatically boot from the disk, loading the blue Windows XP Setup screen. On some computers, you may need to press a button when prompted to boot from the disk. After the Windows XP Setup has finished loading files, press "Enter" as prompted on the screen to set up Windows XP, and then accept the Licensing Agreement on the next screen by pressing "F8." Navigate the partition menu to find the partition on which Windows XP had previously been installed (likely, there will only be one) and press "D" to delete it. Verify that you want to delete the partition on the screens that follow. Set up a new partition, press "C," set the desired for the partition and press "Enter" to create it. The new partition will now be listed on the previous partition menu. Select the newly partitioned space, and press "Enter" to set up Windows XP on it. The Windows XP Setup program will format the new partition and continue with the graphical user interface portion of the installation process after the computer reboots. Navigate through the set-up menus that follow. The setup program will reboot the computer and load Windows after it has finished installing files. Reinstall any drivers and software that may previously have been installed on the computer by inserting their disks and going through their installation processes. Download Windows updates from Microsoft's website. (See Link Below.)

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/downloads/windowsupdate/default.mspx

Mar 04, 2013 | Acer Aspire M3201 Phenom X3 8650 PC...

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





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If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

How do i reset my hp computer back to the way i bought it?


factory settings could mean performing a system restore to a previous state of the OS. I'll try to explain how you can perform each one of these methods in the article below.
Restore Factory Settings - System Restore System Restore is the in-built tool of Windows XP and Windows Vista that allows you to roll back the registry to a previous state. Note that it only "restores" previous settings for the registry and Windows system files.
You can use system restore to get rid of spyware, but if system restore does not fix your problem, you'll have to resort to either a clean install of the OS or using your recovery CD/DVDs.
You can read my previous post on how to restore your computer using the System Restore feature. If system restore is disabled, you can read my post on how to enable system restore again.
restorefactorysettings-thumb.png
Restore Factory Settings - Recovery CD/DVDs Most computers come with either a recovery CD/DVD or a recovery partition that is hidden on the computer. This is true for most HP and Dell machines now these days.
If you have one of these, you can access the recovery from within Windows or during startup.
For HP, you can go to Start, All Programs, HP Tools, and then choose HP PC System Recovery.
hprecoverymanager-thumb.png
You can also press the F10 key multiple times during bootup to get access to the recovery console in case Windows is not loading properly.
On Dells, you can access the recovery partition by pressing Ctrl + F11 immediately after the machine is turned on.
Note that all of your data will be lost on the hard drive. Using a recovery CD is not the same as repairing XP. When you repair Windows XP, all of the system files are replaced with the original ones, but your data and applications remain intact.
Restore Factory Settings - Clean Install XP Your last and final option for restoring XP to factory settings is to perform a clean install. This requires having the CD/DVD for the OS. If you only have a hidden recovery partition, you will not be able to perform a clean install.
A clean install basically consists of booting from the original XP CD, deleting all partitions, recreating new partitions, and then installing Windows XP from CD.
It's a fairly straight-forward process and you can read this excellent tutorial for step by step instructions. Again, it's important to note that you will lose all your data in this process.

Oct 05, 2010 | PC Desktops

3 Answers

Old program won't run on new computer win XP but runs on others


> ran slow

Probably, having more RAM would make VMWARE run faster.

> except Sound Laundry 2.5

Check the manufacturer's web-site -- surely, they have a version which *DOES* work as a "native" application under Windows XP and Windows VIsta and Windows 7, i.e., no need for "compatibility settings".

Nov 05, 2009 | HP Pavilion A6400f Desktop PC, Refurbished

4 Answers

Will a Compaq Presario SR1303WM run windows Vista?


Yes it will, but make sure you have the drivers for it.

Thanks
Kevin

Jul 07, 2009 | HP Compaq Presario SR1303wm PC Desktop

1 Answer

Lost file


Try This :

Do a sytem restore of your C Drive. this is not a garuntee but it might work:

XP:

To use System Restore to restore Windows XP to a previous state, follow these steps:
  1. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
  2. Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Restore. System Restore starts.
  3. On the Welcome to System Restore page, click Restore my computer to an earlier time (if it is not already selected), and then click Next.
  4. On the Select a Restore Point page, click the most recent system restore point in the On this list, click a restore point list, and then click Next.

    Note A System Restore message may appear that lists configuration changes that System Restore will make. Click OK.
  5. On the Confirm Restore Point Selection page, click Next. System Restore restores the previous Windows XP configuration, and then restarts the computer.
  6. Log on to the computer as Administrator. The System Restore Restoration Complete page is displayed.
  7. Click OK.
Vista:

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/windows-vista/using-windows-vista-system-restore/

Mar 10, 2009 | Dell Dimension 4600 PC Desktop

1 Answer

I cant install windows xp on my computer


Hi :-).

OK. You say that "You can't put it on", so by this I presume that there was previously an Operating System on your Machine? If so, was it Windows XP or Windows Vista?
If you had Windows Vista on there, but did not like the look and feel of it, and decided to remove it so that you can put Windows XP on there, then it's a lot more trickier to format Drives that have been shipped out with Windows Vista OEM, then what it would be normally.
If your Laptop had XP on there, but for one reason or another, it needed to be reinstalled, then let me know and I'll try and help you out a bit more based on the answer you reply with.

Mixtrixx


Dec 13, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

A system restore


System restore is a feature in windows 2000/xp/vista. It lets you restore your computer to a previous date restoring the settings you had that day.

It does not affect files that saved in your hard drive.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/helpandsupport/learnmore/systemrestore.mspx

Oct 03, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

I want to reset my compaq desktop to factory setting


If you are using a Window vista there is an option to do that, on the maintenance option>back up and restore - you can restore it to the previous installment.

For windows XP, try to use system restore, restore it to the most previous date

Sep 11, 2008 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Unable to install CD


what os were you using....quick note...vista has too mant bugs not the best os...xp is..

Aug 30, 2008 | PC Desktops

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