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Facing problem in focusing,cosmo wing 20-120x zoom

Focusing problem

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Brand new and out of the box the eyepieces seem to look in slightly different directions causing a ghosting of the image. It gets worse as you zoom in to the maximum setting. I have tried adjusting all...


Return them for a refund or exchange. Either the prisms need adjusting or the eyepiece carrier yoke has got bent in transit and neither are user-fixable items.

Nikon are usually excellent, but like all such products only a small sample are quality tested during production, so it's inevitable that a few rogue faulty examples will eventually reach customers.

Aug 13, 2011 | Nikon Action Binocular

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

2 Answers

I bought the 10x25 camera binoculars and only one lens will focus using the center dial. Its almost like the other one needs to be focused at the eye piece itself. The pictures are not clear and are...


It is common for binoculars to have one independently focusable eyepiece.  If one eyepiece can be rotated, then that is the case.
If that is the case, focus through the one that DOES NOT rotate using the center control until you get a sharp image on that side.  Then rotate the eyepiece on the blurry side until the blurry side is sharp.  If you succeed at this, from henceforth the center control will focus both eyes adequately

Aug 11, 2010 | Sharper Image Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Minolta Standard Zoom 7x to 15x x35 binoculars


yes it is fixable its the inner lenses coming loos and they will need to be fully striped down and cleaned the body air blasted out and then all lubed and put back together before being re-gased,,,standerd overhall job,,,pricy too,,,

Mar 03, 2010 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Double vision with the optics. Dropped and now the binocular has double vision.


The yoke which connects the eyepieces and keeps them aligned as the focus changes is damaged. If you can easily move one eyepiece back and forth with respect to the other then the yoke has broken, if not then it's bent, probably cracked and waiting to break.This is probably the most common fault on most binoculars, and it's usually uneconomic to repair.

If bent, the yoke *might* be able to be straightened, but it will be weakened and the alignment afterwards will rarely be spot-on. If broken, then the yoke must be replaced professionally but the repair often costs more than replacing the binoculars with new. The break cannot be simply glued: the contact area is too small to carry the loads it has to carry, and you also usually find that the yoke bent before breaking anyway so you then have all the same problems as you do with a bent yoke.

The fragile nature of the yoke is why binoculars must always be inserted into their case with the objective lenses facing down; this avoids shock loads on the delicate yoke assembly.

If you have a telescope and binocular repair specialist located conveniently to you then it may worth getting an estimate for repairs, but there are few these days with the skills to do so. Minolta no longer exist, so spare parts will be almost as scarce as rocking horse droppings. But if you're in the UK, then visit or phone Kay Optical for advice.

I hope that you've found my posting to be of use and in return ask only that you take a moment to rate my answer.

Feb 09, 2010 | Minolta Classic II Zoom Binocular

1 Answer

Minolta Compact AF 8 binocular continually focussing


My Binos are doing the same thing, I think it is some fixed mode it is stuck in. Anyone know how to get is back to normal working? Maybe the big AF button is stuck on?

Help please as I can't find my instruction manual.

Feb 07, 2010 | Minolta Compact Binocular

1 Answer

Double vision in minolta binoculars


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Aug 30, 2009 | Minolta Activa Standard Zoom Binocular

1 Answer

See two images at higher power.


Your binoculars are out of collimation. That means that the optical path needs to be aligned. Binoculars are designed so that the focus point of each barrel is the same over long and as short as possible distances. Binoculars that are properly aligned will still show a double image if you attempt to focus at something close that is too close for the models design. However this is not the same for long distances. The image at a long distance must not be doubled.

If they are under warranty and you haven't damaged them by dropping etc send them for repair to the manufacturer or ask the retailer where to send them.

If you are going to pay to have them fixed get a quote first. Binoculars that are of the zoom variety are not well thought of among binocular officionados as the quality of image degrades at higher magnification. For the price of repair you may be able to source a higher quality non zoom binocular.

Jul 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Spion (AR001)

1 Answer

I would like to know where to send my husbands Minolta zoom 19514845 to be repaired. It is called a Minolta zoom stanard zoom, 8x-20x50, 3.1 degrees at 20x. The zoom does not work. You can focus without...


sorry to give you bad news , but most zoom binoculars are not worth cost to repair, they are made of either a small steel band or tiny metal gears to enable both sides to work simultaneously, once they are broken it is almost impossible to find matching parts. sorry....larry@reichinstruments.com

Dec 29, 2008 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

Bushnell 10 - 30X50 adjustment


on some models the center focus control is located on the center hinge,it should be flat,and not hard to find,if there is no center wheel this is where it should be...good luck...larry@reichinstruments.com

Nov 19, 2008 | Binoculars & Monoculars

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