Question about Dayton 3VU34 Heater

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240v circuit wiring to run my new Dayton Heater (3Vu34A)

I was planning to run a new wire from my dryer plug (with a 40 amp breaker), that is not being used, to my garage that I will be heating.
Is the 40amp protection too high for the heater circuit?
What size wire should I run if its ok?
10-3? or is 12-3 good enough?
I could also run a new circuit from a new 30amp breaker, but the cost will be higher and I would like to avoid this if I can safely.
Thanks,
MattS

Posted by on

  • mrcc1234 Jan 29, 2009

    From my panel to the dryer plug which is 40amps is about 45ft. From the earlier post I am guessing its likely a 8-3 and its grounded. I have another 10ft to run to the new plug location. The heater has a 30amp, 240volt NEMA #6-30P plug type. The heater is rated at 240volt, 4000watt, 16.7amp. If I ran a new cable the total length would be about 50ft.

    Thanks, Matt

  • Joe Hogan May 11, 2010

    Tell me the distance from the new heater to the dryer plug, and the distance from the dryer plug to the electrical panel.



    also what size breaker do u now have for the dryer?



    And what size is the heater as far as watts. Is the heater 110 volts or 220 volts. get back

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3 Answers

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Thanks for your quick reply. First of all let me cite the UL position on this issue:

Avoid using an extension cord with your air heater. If you must use an extension cord, it should have a rating 1.25 times the wattage rating of the heater. For example, you should use a cord rated at least 1,875 watts with a 1,500 watt heater.

That being said I strongly recommend that you spend the few extra dollars to install a double pole breaker and the proper size wire and outlet to make this a completely safe project. If you are going directly from a panel to the area of the heater I would use 10-3 with ground and do the job right.

In the long run I can assure you that you will feel real good about doing this job by the Underwriters Laboratory specification

Posted on Jan 29, 2009

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  • Master
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Yes, 40 amp circuit is to high for that unit. That unit requires a 20 Amp 240 volt, 3-wire circuit. Since the dryer circuit is abandoned, you can remove the current dryer circuit breaker and replace it with a 2 pole 20 amp circuit breaker. You can then remove the dryer outlet, run 20 amp circuit wire (#12) (probably in 1'2" conduit) from the dryer (now) junction box to the heater outlet in the garage. Make up your joints in the dryer j-box with large blue or gray wire nuts, put a blank cover on the box, and it's a done deal.

You don't need 12-3, 12-2 with ground is fine, however, you have to sleeve it with conduit from the ceiling down in both the laundry room and the garage.

Posted on Jan 29, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • Bob
    Bob Jan 29, 2009

    Yes, a 30 amp circuit is correct, I didn't look close enough at the spec sheet, but if it came with a 30 amp plug, then a 30 amp circuit is needed. A #10 building wire or 10-2 romex will work.

  • Bob
    Bob Jan 29, 2009

    Of course, now you need 3/4" conduit if you use romex.

  • Bob
    Bob Jan 29, 2009

    Only one more concern. If the wire for the dryer is aluminum, then you'll need a special connector for the AL/CU joint.

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  • 360 Answers

On the 40 amp breaker, you should be using 8-3 w/ground. 10-3 w/ground will work on the 30 amp breaker. 12-3 w/ground is used for 20 amp circuits. Your new heater should have the electrical requirements listed in the user/installation information.



Posted on Jan 29, 2009

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