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I took about 50 pictures today and they are not on my SD card? I was outside and shooting fast, but I could see the image after I took it - when I got home, they were not there??? I have the nikon d60

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Check and see if the card is formatted for the camera.
It should have it on the menu on your camera

Posted on Jan 29, 2009

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What could the problem be if my canon 350d focuses but does not take a picture?


Taking a picture with point-and-shoots are so simple as to be dull. Not so much with a SLR at times. There may be a couple of things going on here, first thing is your camera only has the ability to shoot so fast, as its internal buffer takes time to capture and write to that zone, then it takes time to transfer to the memory card. Secondly, the memory card itself, in your case an sd if I have that correct, only writes so fast, and also has to buffer the data. You can buy a camera based on its ability to write very fast data, and you can buy very expensive memory cards that write very fast, but even the quickest camera bodies and cards all have a limitation. You'll have to wait while the writing of image data is fulfilled. If on the other hand it won't take a picture even after moments or a full minute goes by, then you have an internal problem, or bad connections, or a bad pin on the card or the card connection port. You can pull the card out, examine both the card and the port with a magnifying glass, or try another card. It can cost upwards of a $100-$200 to repair for most models in your camera's class.

Jul 17, 2014 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

I can't get rid of Error message on my Konica Minolta Z5 : SD card seems blocked, even after reformatting, because some pix may have been rotated 90 degrees ???


The Z5 can display photos that it took. However, it cannot display edited photos. Due to the way the JPEG standard is defined, a rotation of the picture constitutes editing. If you rotate it four times, or once and then undo, it still constitutes editing. If you open a picture and then save it without doing anything else, it still counts as editing. Thus, if you want to put pictures back onto the card, you'll have to use the original pictures.
The proper workflow is to download the pictures to your computer. Then, if you're going to do any work on any of these pictures, do it on copies. This way, if you totally mess up an edit, you'll still have the original.

Feb 01, 2012 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My nikon D40 will take take take pics then all of a sudden it wont take and I have to stop turn it off then turn it back on and it will take.... It's like I am taking too many pictures is that possible? I...


The guy at wolfe is sort of correct, but missed just enough of the truth to convince you to buy a high performance memory card.

There are several speeds of SD and CF cards as well as for the devices (your camera) that read & write those cards. If your camera was built for the original (slowest) speed, then it doesn't matter how fast the card is, the camera can only provide the data to the card at the slow rate. The D40 came out c.a. 2006 and supports SDHC. If your old card was simply SD, then upgrading to SDHC should help.

HOWEVER, the camera is still capable of taking pictures faster than it can write to the card. It buffers the image data in RAM, but when that buffer is full, it stops taking pictures.

You shouldn't need to turn the camera off & on...just wait a few seconds and you should be able to shoot again. You don't have to buy a new camera, just be aware of its limitations.

If shooting in jpeg and using an sdhc card, the camera specifications indicate the number of shots before filling the buffer is unlimited. BUT if shooting in RAW mode, the number is 9. Try shooting in jpeg unless you really need the abilty to tweak the RAW images. Chances are, if you're shooting fast, jpeg images should work for you.

Mar 10, 2011 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

When on photo shoots camera will let me take a few pictures then gives a busy light and won't let me take another piucture until busy light goes off. I am missing alot of shots over this problem


The problem is that the camera can take pictures faster than it can write them to memory. It buffers a few in a high-speed memory location, but once that memory is filled, it has to be emptied to your memory card.

Your options are:
Use a smaller image size. Most cameras support small, medium, and large formats. Typically something like 2 Mpix, 5 Mpix, and 10 Mpixel images. Smaller images take less time to write to the memory card. If you are shooting in RAW format, this makes the problem even worse. If you don't know what RAW format is, you probably aren't using it.

Depending on the camera, it might support a higher speed than the memory card. SD is slower than SDHC, which is slower than SDXC. Check your manual and see what the maximum speed your camera can support and ensure your card is at least that fast. (IF the card is faster than the camera's ability to write, that doesn't improve things more than having a card as fast as the camera).

Be careful with your shots. There is probably an icon or counter that shows how many pictures left until if stops taking pictures. If something good is coming up, hold of on taking any pictures.

Buy a camera with either a bigger buffer or a higher speed interface to the memory card. I know, this one is a drag. My first DSLR could take only 9 pictures, then same problem.

Feb 27, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

My nikon d60 is starting to take forever to show the picture after taking the photo, and now all the sudden is shows a black box with shooting details on it, i can't get that off!


In your manual you will find how to change the display format (picture only, histogram, etc.). The time it's taking to display your image "might" be that your memory card is getting quite full and you're shooting large images. I shoot a D80 and it uses an SD card. Make sure you but a fast memory card if your camera does not buffer the inage before writing it to your memory card.

Apr 23, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

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