Question about Canon Powershot Sx150 Is 14.1 Mp black 16gb Kit 5664b001 Sx-150

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Sporadic shallow depth of field

Autofocus seems to be overriding manual settings, in AV mode and even in M mode when trying to get shallow depth of field. Sometimes it works, sometimes it does not.

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  • Master
  • 1,019 Answers

Hello Peter, The camera is in need of service / repair, not a user fix on this, sorry.

Posted on Jan 25, 2013

  • Peter Kenvin Jan 27, 2013

    Thankyou to everyone who has replied to this. I have it working now - just had to readjust my expectations of the camera, and my approach to and understanding of how depth of field can be manipulated. Thanks again. :-)

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

MarkDay
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SOURCE: Canon 400d constant backfocus

Backfocus problems will be magnified when using wide aperture lens with shallow depth of field, nice lens btw. Camera's adjustments for manual and autofocus are inside mirror cage behind mirror, and you dont want to risk getting dust on sensor or damaging sensor. Qualified camera repair shop or sending to canon for adjustment would be my suggestion.

Posted on May 15, 2008

Agent Allan
  • 480 Answers

SOURCE: Auto focus

Hey robinhood123,
The camera being in AV or TV mode should not effect the auto focus system, and if the auto focus is working in the automatic modes that implies to me the problem is with the camera body and not the lens. I would try resetting the camera to the factory default settings by following the directions on page 100 of your camera manual. If you no longer have a copy of your manual I have included a link to it below. If resetting the camera doesn't work I would have the camera looked at by an authorized service technician. I hope this helps!

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&tabact=SupportDetailTabAct&fcategoryid=215&modelid=14256#DownloadDetailAct

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

Posted on Jun 26, 2008

marked
  • 6487 Answers

SOURCE: I have an EOS Rebel

That option should show since your camera has the features and not being to show , it can mean that the camera software has some problem wityh it, if your camera is still under warranty better have it replace since some features are lacking..

Hope that helps........

Posted on Aug 31, 2008

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I have a Canon XSI Rebel that I bought new 2 years ago. For some reason when I'm in AV mode I cannot seem to get the ISO down to 100. Is there a setting that I may have missed? When I have the cam


The AV mode is for setting the aperture (ie Depth of Field).
To change the ISO setting turn the Mode dial to the P position and then turn the Main dial (next to the shutter button) to the ISO setting you require.

Apr 08, 2013 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

Tip

Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...


Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD

on Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

Tip

How does aperture setting affect a photograph?


The aperture is the opening in the lens through which light passes to the image sensor. Changing the aperture setting allows you to control the depth of field of a photograph. When the aperture is opened to a widersetting, (indicated by a lower f-stop number) more light is passed to the imagesensor, creating more shallow depth of field. Closing the aperture (indicatedby a higher f-stop number) allows less light to pass to the image sensor,creating wider depth of field.

NOTE: The aperture setting is one of three primary settings usedto control the overall exposure of a photograph. The other two primary settingsare ISO and shutter speed. Because the three settings work together to produce the overall exposure for a photograph, changingthe aperture setting will require complimentary changes to either the ISO or shutter speed to produce a properly exposed photograph. These changes will bemade automatically by the camera in the Auto, Program, Aperture-priority andShutter-priority modes.

There are two ways tocontrol the aperture setting on the camera:
  • Aperture-priority mode (A) - When shooting in Aperture priority mode (A), you set the aperture value and the camera automatically sets the optimum shutter speed for you.
  • Manual mode (M) - When shooting in Manual mode (M), you control both aperture and shutter speed, which gives you maximum creative control to achieve the exact results you want.

on Jan 08, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Vivitar 84mm 1.4 aspherical on Nikon D80


If you mean the 85mm, it's not an autofocus lens. Nor does it have the electronics to communicate with the camera. You need to set the camera to manual exposure mode (turn the mode dial to M) and set the exposure manually. Set the shutter speed by turning the command dial on the back of the camera and the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens.

Again, this is a manual lens. No auto-anything. But it's a nice fast lens, with shallow depth of field when you want it.

Jan 10, 2013 | Cameras

1 Answer

I have a nikon D80 with a 18-135mm lens. Quite frequently the camera refuses to take pictures, but will take if I zoom in or out a bit (the lens is a 18-135mm). This happens both modes I have tried, so...


Maybe very new but you explained the problem so well and even gave an example, I wish others were so throw. I'm going to assume you are attempting a portrait (close to subject 10ft) with the lens at 135mm your depth of field would be fairly shallow, without looking it up and doing some math I'd say about 3/8 of an inch backing the lens up a little say to 100mm would increase this to about maybe 3 inches at your present aperture and shutter speeds. So two things are happening here one you have maxed out the lens close focus capabilities which you found you can back up to say 100mm and it works Second both "auto and P" will balance both the shutter speed and aperture obviously to give correct exposure. What this also does possibly is opens up the aperture ( I have no idea in auto) to I'd think about F5.6 at a shutter speed of 1/60 couple that with your 135mm and you have nothing for Depth Of Field. I'm still assuming you are taking a portrait could also be still life what ever the subject is close and depth of field diminishes the closer you are to your subject and using telephoto zoom lenses. I'll give you a case scenario for portrait at 10 actually better at 12 feet great place to start for what you are doing is (hand held) shutter at 1/80 and your F stop at F8 watch your light meter. Also with that camera you can activate what is called Program Shift, "P" which is program will allow the user to shift ether the aperture, shutter or both from the camera setting, again watch your light meter. If you hesitate a few seconds the setting will return to where the camera feels it should be. Program is the best way to quickly grab a shot then finesse the second shot it will actually teach you how to use the more creative zones Like "M" manual "TV" time value (shutter speed) and "AV" aperture value.
You have a great tool there and with a little time and practice you'll be making some great photo's
Hope I didn't confuse the issue

Jan 11, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

Tip

Manual Aperture Video For Canon Eos Rebel 500D T1i


Unfortunately the Canon T1i shoots video in full automatic mode. This means that if you want to change the depth of field...well, you can't. There are many angry T1i owners trying to get Canon to release a firmware update to have it perform like the T2i, but so far that has been fruitless.

So what can a budding videographer do get some artsy-looking footage with his or her T1i? The Band-Aid solution involves fooling the camera into thinking there is a manual lens attached so that the camera will relinquish control. To do this, the communication between the camera and lens has to be severed (don't worry - it doesn't involve modifying anything).

Step 1.
Put the camera into Av or Manual mode.

Step 2.
Select the desired aperture (if the aperture is "wide open" - e.g. F1.8 on the 50mm F1.8 II lens, then skip Step 3).

Step 3.
Press the depth of field preview button on the side of the camera (above the T1i or 500D logo on the curved part of the camera body).

Step 4.
With the DOF preview button still depressed, push the button as if to remove the lens, and turn it very slightly until "F00" shows up on the back display. You may now release the buttons.

Step 5.
Switch the camera to video mode. There will be a warning message, but just do as it says and shoot anyway.

You're now ready shoot some nice shallow DOF shots. Use the manual focus ring on your lens to shift the shallow depth of field around in your shot. Please note that since the camera is no longer communicating with the lens, autofocus will not be available to you. Put the lens in manual mode on the barrel to be safe - many lenses do NOT have manual override and forcing the focus ring while in AF mode can damage the lens.
Good luck and happy film-making!

on Jul 24, 2010 | Canon EOS 500D / Digital Rebel T1i Digital...

1 Answer

How to use the depth of field


Hi Michelle,

"Depth Of Field" (or DOF) is the amount of distance both in front and behind the point of focus that is also in focus. If there is a very short distance or range of an area that is in focus, it is said to have a shallow depth of field. This shallow DOF is achieved by setting the aperture or "f stop" to the wider or lower number settings. The smallest f stop number will provide the shallowest DOF. The DOF will become broader ir deeper with each increasing f stop setting.

Shallow DOF settings are often used in portraits where the background is desired to be blurred. It is also used in macro (extreme close up) photography, and anywhere a blurred foreground / background is desired.

The down side of this is that the shutter speed will increase proportionately, to maintain a properly exposed image. If you are trying to convey a sense of motion - by allowing the subject to be blurred slightly - you'll have some trouble due to the fast shutter speed. Neutral density filters fixed to the lens can correct this. The other side of the coin is in an indoor and evening outdoor photography. If you're not using a flash, you'll likely have to be shooting more towards the "open end" of the lens (more towards the lower number aperture settings) which while allowing enough light for an good exposure - will also reduce the DOF. Some people or objects in front of and behind the focus point will not be a sharp as a result.

The best thing to do is experiment. set a number of object on a surface - 2', 3' 4' 5' and 6' away from the camera. A tripod or other solid surface can help a great deal. Set the camera up for a "normal" exposure in a full manual or Aperture Priority Mode of the middle object 4 feet away. Take a picture. Next, open the aperture (make the number smaller) and adjust the shutter (if in manual) to expose properly again. Take the picture. Keep doing this both BOTH directions for the aperture from the first "Normal" exposure. Compare the results to see exactly how the DOF changes. Tinker with shutter speeds - or don't change them. Notice that with each time you open the f stop, the shutter must speed up to compensate for more light entering the camera due to the wider aperture setting (and vice versa).

I hope I understood your question correctly and that this helped.

Oct 11, 2010 | Cameras

1 Answer

I do a lot of presentatins an my camera is always letting me dow. The problem is the flash doesn't always work. I put the camera on the 'P' setting. I was given the camera for a Christmas Prtesent and...


"P" is Program mode. The flash won't pop up in this mode unless you tell it to with the manual flash button.
You might be better off starting in Av (Aperture Priority) mode and choosing the depth of field you want via the aperture setting.
The camera will then pick the shutter timing according to the available light.

Choose a smaller number (=larger aperture) for less depth-of field, meaning the background will appear more blurred.

Choose a larger number (=smaller aperture) for more depth-of-field meaning the background will be more in focus.

Feb 10, 2009 | Cameras

3 Answers

Canon Powershot S5IS Aperture


Hey Kate
I have owned a Canon Powershot S5 since launch last year and I take a lot of photos with blurred background. I select AV on the dial (Aperture priority) and set aperture to between 2.7 and about 4.0 max, depending on how much depth of field I want and what my subject is.

This setting blurs the background beautifully.. Just remember that an aperture of 2.7 will give you a very shallow depth-of-field, so if focus on face is important, make sure you have face recognition set to ON.

I hope this helps

Apr 04, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S5 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon 400d constant backfocus


Backfocus problems will be magnified when using wide aperture lens with shallow depth of field, nice lens btw. Camera's adjustments for manual and autofocus are inside mirror cage behind mirror, and you dont want to risk getting dust on sensor or damaging sensor. Qualified camera repair shop or sending to canon for adjustment would be my suggestion.

Feb 27, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

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