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I have a comfortmaker unit with heat strips. The blower fan comes in and blows cool air. I have checked voltage at the transformer, and it is producing 24 vac. The contactor for the fan and condenser never pull in so I replaced the defrost control circuit board. Still only blows cool air and the defrost cycle never comes on. I jump 24vac to the coil on contactor and the defrost fan came on and the condenser came on so the fan motor and start/run capacitor are good. Any suggestions.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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watugot
  • 290 Answers

SOURCE: Ruud heat pump outside unit trips circuit breaker

Check your wiring between the contactor and compressor for a short to ground, or check the compressor windings for short to ground.
With the Tstat off, the contactor should be open so the only way for the compressor to be trying to do anything is if the 110 volts from the unbroken side are traveling through the compressor to ground. Since 110v is not enough to run it, the overload is kicking it out, cooling off, and repeating the cycle. When you kick on the Tstat, the contactor is supplying voltage directly to ground without going through the resistence of the compressor windings and kicking the breaker.
Post back and let me know what you find.

Posted on Nov 20, 2007

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  • 16 Answers

SOURCE: Goodman forced air gas furnace not firing

if your power vent moter is not running you should not have have glowing ignitor.Frist the vent moter must close an air prove switch in series with the idnitor .seems you have a stuck air prove switch.Its the one with a hose attached

Posted on Apr 07, 2009

darjr
  • 378 Answers

SOURCE: a/c unit not working

So only fan is running, the compressor not running okay check the voltage going to the compressor. The connection is coming from Thermostat or temperature controller, if there is supply going to A/c Comp. check the safety thermostat relay above the compressor.

Posted on Jun 01, 2009

  • 534 Answers

SOURCE: Contactor not engaging to start condenser unit

I would replace the contactor if you are getting 24 volts to the contactor and it isn't engaging therefore the magneto on the contactor is out and the contactor will need replacement. If you don't have 24 volts at the contactor then the transformer that sends the 24 volts is bad and will need replacing

Dave

Posted on Mar 11, 2010

  • 1033 Answers

SOURCE: Condenser unit will not run. has 240 volt at

Hello, check the tstat wiring going to the unit for any breaks in or if it has come loose between the indoor unit and outdoor unit. Also, chevk if you are getting voltage from tje control board between the y and c terminal, if not the control board is bad. Last thing to check is remove tstat and jump the y and r wires there if this starts the unit then you have a bad tstat.

Posted on Apr 30, 2011

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3 Answers

My Goodman heat pump doesn't blow air through the vents into the house, but the fan comes on when the thermostat is turn on for the air conditioning


Check first that
  • the air conditioning equipment is turned on,
  • the thermostat is calling for cooling, and that
  • the blower unit or air handler is actually blowing air through the ductwork.
Here are the details of what to check in what order if your air condtioner or heat pump doesn't start at all when you set the room thermostat to call for cooling:
  1. Check the Room Thermostat Temperature Setting: Set the thermostat to at least 5 degrees below room temperature. Our elderly mom has no patience with switches and controls. She regularly calls her air conditioning service company with a service request, sometimes late at night, because she has simply failed to set the temperature on the thermostat lower than the room temperature. Don't drive your A/C like our mother.
  2. Check that the Room Thermostat is set to "Cool" not "Off" or "Heat". If the thermostat is not set to "cool" it is simply turning off your A/C. If the thermostat display is blank then it's not receiving power (for modern digital thermostats). Check that electrical power is on at the air handler and to the the low-voltage transformer that supplies power to the thermostat.

    If the thermostat has power, check that when you set the thermostat temperature down at least 5 degrees below room temperature the thermostat calls for cooling. If it doesn't then check for broken or shorted thermostat wires anywhere between the wall thermostat and the control board at the air handler.

    You can easily eliminate possible thermostat problems as a cause of failure of the air conditioner to start by simply eliminating the thermostat from the picture: disconnect the thermostat wires at the blower unit's control board and instead connect the two thermostat terminals directly together with a jumper wire. If the system starts then the problem is in the thermostat itself or in its wiring.

    If the thermostat is working but the compressor condenser unit won't start, you could skip ahead
    to COMPRESSOR / CONDENSER DIAGNOSTICS but I wish you'd double check the remaining steps in this article first because there are some sneaky snafus listed below that might still be the problem.

  3. Check that electricity is on for the equipment. Check all of the electrical switches and controls that can turn electrical power off at the indoor air handler or at the outdoor compressor/condenser unit. There are more of these switches than you might guess. Here's a list of what to check:

    Electrical power switches and service switches outside by the compressor, inside at the air handler, and fuses or circuit breakers in the electrical panel. Don't forget to check that the access covers to the equipment are properly closed and latched. Otherwise a
    BLOWER DOOR SAFETY SWITCH could be keeping the equipment from running.

    There are several other safety switches and controls, both manual and automatic that can leave an air conditioner or heat pump turned "off" such as a blower compartment door interlock safety switch, an electric motor overload or overheat switches, and a condensate tray spillage detector switch.

    Some hard-to-find electrical switches on an air conditioner or heat pump could be keeping your air conditioner from starting, such as
    a FLOAT SWITCH on Condensate Tray that could
    be
    causing CONDENSATE PAN SWITCH LOCKOUT - condensate spilling into an overflow pan that uses a sensor switch can be enough to shut down your air conditioner.
    or
    a blower MOTOR OVERLOAD RESET SWITCH could be keeping a fan motor from starting.

    A bad or failed starter capacitor could also be leaving your system shut down, failing to start a blower, fan, or compressor motor.
    See CAPACITORS for HARD STARTING MOTORS

    Watch out: See A/C - HEAT PUMP CONTROLS & SWITCHES to be sure you have found and checked everymanual or automatic electrical switch on the system.
  4. Check the electrical supply voltage. Even if electricity is on, if the supply voltage has fallen too far below the operating voltage range of your air conditioner it's likely that the system will not operate, particlarly, you may note that the compressor motor won't start.
    See VOLTS MEASUREMENT METHODS

Aug 22, 2017 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

Tip

Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

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Asus laptop randomly shuts down


Possibly overheating. I would check the fan and airways are free from fluff.

Oct 06, 2015 | ASUS Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have a Carries AC unit (model FK4CNF002). Heat pump in the outside works but blower doesn't (tried both heat and cool). Power load (240V) on the blower is there and I also measured the voltage on control...


If you have determined that the line voltage is getting to the blower motor then the unit is defective and needs to be replaced. Check for the presence of the voltage at the wires going directly into the motor to make sure. It is not the compactor relay because it supplies power to both the compressor and condenser fan. If your air handler is inside the house, the housing also has circuit breakers for the fan motor - check that also.

Nov 23, 2013 | Carrier Heating & Cooling

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Will be to clean each contact-switch and scrape the contacts and use wd40 and spray of air and remove all rust, its possible that exist another options of failure.

Jun 17, 2012 | Heating & Cooling

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Transformer keeps blowing on the high side after about 15 Min? Have changed out many transformers and blower motor.


Replace the transformer with a 75va resettable transformer.
Check all wiring for a loose connection at the unit and the disconnect and the breaker panel.
Double check ground wires.
Check the low voltage side for a back feed short from a faulty component.
Could be caused from a bad thermostat wire.
Do a continuity reading on stat wires to look for a short.
Do an amp draw reading on the unit to determine an increase in amperage.

Jul 18, 2011 | Ruud UBHC Air Conditioner

1 Answer

The pole buiding 24 in hanging Dayton sometimes the blower comes on like after 5 minutes after everything else kicks in and sometimes like when its supposed to and sometimes not at all?? All the electric...


I'm not sure whether this is a gas unit or not. With many gas heaters, the blower comes on when the heat exchanger gets hot enough and goes off once the heat exchanger cools. Other things are happening before the blower goes on. The blower is normally controlled by a "fan control thermostat". This stat actuates the blower when the furnace is hot enough so that cold air is not being blown around and allows the blower to run until the furnace cools enough to get out the remaining heat after the flame shuts off but not so long to again allow cool air to blow around. If this fan control is malfunctioning, you will get erratic runs from the blower or the blower may not run at all or run long or continuously. The fan control is the first thing to check.
Gary

Jan 31, 2011 | Dayton Gas Furnace Heater

1 Answer

My Home Ac Unit Is Not Blowing Any Air


This sounds like the fan not turning during cool. You will have to check the fan relay for power during the cool cycle. The fan relay is run by the low voltage side, but still there is hi voltage present. When in heat the power goes thru the relay on one set of points then in cool goes thru the opposite side. You should have a digram present, and then on the main circuit board there is a code light. Check the light for blinking or (flash) read the bottom of the board for the code ( very small print)

May 17, 2010 | Goodman CKL24AR24 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

My out side unit will not come on i have checked thermoastate wires capacitor and voltage and freon ,, points are not pulling in its a yr old split air from goodman


You should have 24v ac at the coil to the contactor (points) as you call them. The 24v comes from the indoor unit through the thermostat. If you manually push in the contactor does the unit run. If so, then the problem lies in the low voltage circuit somewhere.
If the indoor blower comes on when you switch the thermostat to fan them you have low vaoltage and the transformer is okay if not then change the transformer or fuse. if you have low voltage then you need to be checking for a broken wire of a bad thermostat on the cooling side. depending on your thermostat a relay can go bad in it the runs the cooling.

Nov 12, 2009 | Goodman CLQ36AR49 Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Blown Transformer heat pump


blown transformers are usually from a low voltage short the first thing i would do is wire a automotive or resetable 3amp fuse in line with the transformer so you dont blow transformer after transformer the wire coming off the transformer that say 24v take that wire a couple of inches down and cut it and install the fuse in series there
24v----------------
24v----------x----------
24v--------{3ampfuse}----------

now you can go through your low voltage wires one by one and test them unhook all the wires to your outdoor condenser at your indoor unit(furnace or airhandler) and try turning it to cool now if you blow the fuse the short is between the tstat and the indoor unit if the fuse is still good leave it on cool and hook up one wire at a time to your outdoor unit starting with R a lot of times your contactor or your defrost board will short out on you also look for pinches in wires wires with cracks in the insulation and wires touching metal this situation can be a real pain sometimes i would recommend calling a hvac company if you start to get stumped
hope this will help you

Jul 26, 2009 | Ruud UBHC Air Conditioner

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