Question about Canon EOS-10D Digital Camera

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Canon EOS 10D Shutter getting in the way on fast shutter speeds

On shutter speeds quicker than 1/750s there is a dark band at the top of the picture. Increasing the shutter speed makes the band wider until at 1/1500s there is no picture. It appears the mirror is either not getting out of the way fast enough, or is returning back down to quickly. Any suggestions welcomed.

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Does this problem occur only when you are taking flash photos? You may be exceeding the shutter's maximum flash sync speed, one shutter curtain is blocking the flash exposure. At speeds below max sync you get full frame exposure, correct?

Posted on Dec 14, 2007

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Posted on Jul 22, 2007

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I did not get any instructions with my Opteka. Have tried to take photos with it. But they came out all blank. I used a tripod. Would like to know where I can down load instructions. Certainly not as good...


You did not provide enough information to determine what your problem is. For example, were the pictures all light or all dark. Knowing this lens, I will assume that they were all dark. So...

1) This is a very, very slow manual-focus lens. It will not auto focus. It must be manually focused very precisely because it has virtually no depth of field.
2) Depending on your camera, your internal light meter may not work. On my camera (Nikon D-90), it does. If it does not on yours and I suspect that may be your problem, you're going to have to shoot everything manually, i.e. setting the shutter speed and lens opening yourself. You can use your internal light meter to help you get started by taking your light reading before you install the lens...preferably using the aperture only setting where you set the aperture at f8 which I think is the speed of the Opteka and let the camera set the shutter speed. Make a note of the shutter speed then attach the Opteka to the camera and mount the lens on a tripod with the camera attached.
Then set your camera mode to manual and set the aperture to match the lens (f8, I think). Set the shutter speed at the speed you noted earlier. Shoot a picture using a remote shutter release or the self timer. This lens is so slow that unless you're in exceptionally bright conditions you will get fuzzy pictures due to camera movement at full zoom of 1200m and above if you're using the 2X doubler. I would start shooting at minimum zoom of 650 without the 2X doubler. Shoot a picture. and check the result.

You should have an image but it may be too light or too dark.

If its too light you'll need to increase the shutter speed or stop down the aperture to, say, f11...or both. Make the adjustment and shoot another picture. Remember that if you increase the aperture, you increase your depth of field, making focus less critical. If you increase the shutter speed you make camera or subject movement less critical.

If it's too dark, you can only increase the shutter speed because you can't open the lens any wider than f8. Make the adjustment and shoot the picture.

Keep doing this until the pictures are the way you want them.

This is a decent lens for the price and worth the little money they cost if you can't afford $10,000 plus for a high quality telephoto lens of this size. I would forget about the 2X doubler because as others have said, it further reduces the speed of an already very slow lens with such a high rate of magnification that a knat landing on the lens could cause the picture to blur from movement.

Jun 26, 2011 | Opteka 650-2600mm High Definition...

1 Answer

What are the best settings to use the Opteka 500MM Mirror Lens with a Pentax K-7. Also when you you add the 2.0X teleconverter with this lens?


These big lenses are very slow and cannot deliver much light to your camera. Obviously, you can't open the aperture any wider than f8 as specified by the lens itself. In the old days, most inexpensive cameras were fixed focus at f8 with a shutter speed of 1/100 sec. That's a good place to start with this lens without the doubler.

If the pictures are too dark, you can't open the lens any wider so your only option is to reduce the shutter speed.

That means that motion of the shooter or the subject will be more inclined to cause blurring so you need to be shooting from a tripod with a remote shutter release and/or a delayed shutter release setting.

If the test picture is too light, I would first reduce the lens opening to the next stop, f9 or f11, then shoot another test shot. You could also increase shutter speed, or both o reduce the light reaching the camera sensor. Keep shooting test shots until you get the exposure you want.

Once you add the doubler, you compound this situation because it will further reduce the lens speed by about 2 f-stops, meaning that you have to start your tests at f-11 at 1/100 sec. or f-11 at 1/50 sec. This gives you far less flexibility to properly adjust exposure.

Further, you will have increased the magnification so much that a slight breeze or a fly landing on the lens can cause vibration and blur the picture.

Before you shoot any serious pictures, you need to experiment with this lens so that you know exactly what its capability is.

Jun 23, 2011 | Opteka 500mm f8 for Pentax K

1 Answer

My nikon d3000 is giving me a subject too dark message


This means your exposure is too low. Ensure your lens cap is off and make adjustments to compensate for your lighting with: using flash, lowering your aperture value, lowering your shutter speed or increasing your iso. Play with these values until you find the proper balance or switch to Auto mode. If it is still to dark, find more adequate light.

Jan 16, 2011 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I'm having problems with the settings on my Canon EOS 400D. When I take pictures in AV mode I can get quality pictures but in TV or M modes the pictures always come out so dark even when taking them...


You need to understand the relationship and teractivity of aperture, shutter speed and iso. In Av mod, you choose the aperture and the camera makes thw shutter speed agjustment, In Tv mode, you set the shutter speed and the camera makes the aperture adjustment, In manual, you have to set both shutter speed and aperture manually. If the ISO mode is set to AUTO, the camera chooses the sensors sensitivity to light automatically. Change to specific ISO
(200-400 for daylight and 799-1600 for night). Take a picture in AV mode and note what shutter speed the camera chose. Then switch to TC mode choose the same shutter speed and see if camera chose the same aperture(f-stop) you chose in first shot. Change to Manual and choose same f-stop and shutter speed the camera chose for you in the other modes. Compare all three photos. They should be almost if not exactly the same exposure wise.
In Tv mode choose a dlowers shutter speed, In Manual choose a combo of slower shuuter and wider f-stop(smaller number). Read your manual.

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

I took a picture in the s mode or any mode messing with the shutter speed and when i go to view the picture i just get a black screen.....i am not sure why this is happening....any thoughts?


Proper exposure is a balancing act between the shutter speed and the aperture (the size of the opening in the lens). (There's also the ISO sensitivity, but I'll ignore that for now.) If the shutter is open for a longer time, the lens must be closed down. If the shutter is open for a shorter time, the lens must be opened up wider to allow the same amount of light to reach the sensor.

The Shutter priority mode attempts to adjust the aperture to give the proper exposure for the shutter speed you've selected. The lens has physical limits as to how wide the opening can be. If the shutter speed is too fast, the lens will only open as far as it can go but that may not be enough. In this case the camera will display "Lo" in the viewfinder to warn you but will go ahead and take the picture anyway. If the shutter speed is too fast then you won't get enough light through the lens and you'll end up with a dark or black picture.

Try reducing the shutter speed (leaving it open for a longer time), like 1/30 of a second instead of 1/125 of a second. If the shutter is open too long, you run the risk of camera motion. You can also increase the ISO setting, making the sensor more sensitive to light. This increases digital noise, which looks somewhat like film grain. You can also try adding more light, perhaps by using the flash, if the subject isn't too far from the camera.

Dec 18, 2010 | Nikon D3100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do you take a picture of a fast movement?


It depends on the effect you want.
  • To freeze motion, you need either a fast shutter speed, or a fast flash in a dark environment. In less than bright light you may not be able to get a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action. Increasing the camera's sensitivity to light by increasing the ISO will help some.
  • You can blur the motion by using a slower shutter speed and a stable camera. Set a slow shutter speed and put the camera on a tripod or other stable surface, and you can get things like streaking car taillights and star trails. How slow a shutter speed depends on the speed of the subject.
  • You can pan with the subject. Move the camera with the subject, and keep it moving even while the display blanks out while taking the picture. This will keep the subject sharper while blurring the background to lend a sense of motion to the picture.
  • It's either to freeze motion if the subject is moving straight toward or away from you than if it's moving across your field of vision.

Sep 10, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

What should I set the Nikon D80 on to take basketball pictures? when I put it on the lowest aperage I still have a little blurring. On auto it is too dark and when I put it on shutter speed it was also too...


I take it you're shooting indoors?

To get the fastest possible shutter speed, use the Aperture-priority (A) mode and turn the sub-command dial on the front counterclockwise until the numbers stop changing. This sets the lens at its widest aperture.

Even at your lens's widest aperture, the shutter speed will usualy be too slow to freeze the action. You can ease the situation a little by increasing the ISO, though this will result in additional noise. Personally, I'd prefer a noisy picture over a blurry picture.

If the action is close enough, you can use your flash (assuming it's permitted).

Adding lights to the gym is probably out of the question :-(

Other than that, about the only thing you can do is to use a faster lens. But then you're talking $2000 for a stop or two. That's one (or 2000) of the things that separates the _Sports Illustrated_ photographers from the rest of us.

Jan 29, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Black area in photograph


Unless you are using high-end Nikon Speedlights with camera and flash set for Auto FP High-Speed Sync, your top flash sync shutter speed on the D80 is 1/200 second. The black band you are seeing at faster shutter speeds is because the second curtain of the shutter begins to close before the first curtain reaches the fully-open position (which is when the flash fires). The higher the shutter speed, the shorter the gap between first and second curtains. To get full exposure with flash, there must be an instant when the shutter is fully open -- first curtain completed travel, second curtain not started yet.

"As the speed increases the final image should get lighter" applies to ISO speed. Higher shutter speeds mean less light reaching the sensor, but that's not the cause of the black bands.

Mar 22, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Dark pictures


You can try adjusting your exposure settings, or try and use the slow shutter speed settings like the auto night mode... Try increasing the white balance as well...

Dec 09, 2007 | Pentax Optio E10 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sport mode settings


Sports photography requires two things: Long zoom, fast shutter speed, and lots of light. Hey! that's three. Ok. So three things.

With your S3IS, you need to use a fast shutter speed to freeze the action (pitchers' arms go pretty fast!) - I suggest trying at 1/500, then 1/1000 second settings. Your camera won't select that automatically, so set the dial to shutter priority, and select that shutter speed. Then, with that shutter speed, you'll likely need to adjust other facets of your exposure to capture enough light. Zoomed in, you'll have an aperture (f/stop) of f/3.5 - or higher (remember: for f/stop, higher numbers = smaller iris, lower number = wider open iris). With your fast shutter speed, you're now fighting for light, so you need the smallest f/stop number you can get - which will be f/2.7 if you're zoomed out, or f/3.5 if you're zoomed in. If at 1/500 shutter and f/3.5 you still have a dark photo, try bumping your ISO setting up to 200 or 400. If you choose 400 or higher you will have a grainy picture. And will need to use a software noise reduction to clean it up.

With the suggestions above, you'll likely not be blurry, but you may be dark. If this is on a bright sunny day, you'll be fine. If this is at a ball park under the lights you may have different results.

Hope this helps...

Oct 17, 2007 | Canon PowerShot S3 IS Digital Camera

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