Question about Gateway GT4016 Desktop PC

1 Answer

Have GT4016 with no disk. Cannot reformat going thru the normal process. Pressing R upon boot starts the execution but will not contiue. Stops. I have a copy of win xp pro. Tried using this too but it will not allow this to be used either.. Thanks

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Genius:

    An expert who has answered 1,000 questions.

  • Gateway Master
  • 1,250 Answers

During the boot up process press f8 repeatedly then select the system restore option, then select the date where your system is perfect try it

Posted on Jan 22, 2013

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Why my Toshiba Satekkite laptop won't reformat the hard drive?


Why are you trying to reformat the drive ? The entire operating system and all files will be destroyed if you do this. To reformat the drive requires an external program on a disk that would allow you to reinstall windows from scratch. Most Bios chips can do a reformat but accessing these low level programs is for pros only and varies widely from machine to machine. Unless you have a nasty Trojan, virus or worm that can't be removed any other way I would not do this. You will need a working copy of a boot disk to get the machine up and running after the reformat. Then you can reinstall the Operating System. If you had been successful in your reformat you would have found yourself with a DEAD MACHINE unless you had a boot disk ready.

May 25, 2014 | Toshiba Computers & Internet

Tip

Master Boot Record


MBR Short for <i><b>M</b>aster <b>B</b>oot <b>R</b>ecord,</i> a small <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/program.html">program</a> that is executed when a computer <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/B/boot.html">boots up</a>. Typically, the MBR resides on the first <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/sector.html">sector</a> of the <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/H/hard_disk.html">hard disk</a>. The program begins the boot process by looking up the partition table to determine which <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/partition.html">partition</a> to use for booting. It then transfers program control to the <i>boot sector</i> of that partition, which continues the boot process. In <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/D/DOS.html">DOS</a> and <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/W/Windows.html">Windows</a> systems, you can create the MBR with the FDISK /MBR command. <br /> An <i>MBR virus</i> is a common type of <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/V/virus.html">virus</a> that replaces the MBR with its own code. Since the MBR executes every time a computer is started, this type of virus is extremely dangerous. MBR viruses normally enter a system through a <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/floppy_disk.html">floppy disk</a> that is installed in the <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/floppy_drive.html">floppy drive</a> when the computer is started up. Even if the floppy disk is not <a href="http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/B/bootable_diskette.html">bootable</a>, it can infect the MBR. <br />

on Dec 22, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Reformat my computer to windows 7


ATTENTION!
Reformatting a computer will reset it to the factor image, all data must be backed up or it WILL be lost. There are several reasons to reformat a hard drive. A few reasons include but are not limited to: driver issues, virus, cleaning up, getting rid of the computer, etc.

RECOVERY DISKS!
Every new windows 7 owner should know that the new computers are not supplied with recovery disks anymore. The manufacturer allows the user to create one set of disks upon the purchase of a new machine. It is important to create the disks early as driver issues and viruses may arise. In order to create recovery disks on windows 7 you want to click on the start menu. Next, type in recovery in the Start Search option area. Next, click on recovery disk creation and follow the process. It will require that you have about 3 dvds or about 7 cds to create the recovery disk.

REFORMATING HARD DRIVE!
Once the recovery disks have been made reformatting windows 7 is quite simple. Insert the recovery disks into the cd/dvd tray on the machine. You are now going to want to turn the computer off. When the computer has turned off, go ahead and turn it back on. A screen should pop up asking you whether you want to boot from Hard Drive or Disk. Choose the disk option. After you make it this far it is a downhill process. Next you follow the on-screen instruction make sure you reformat the machine, not recover it.

Apr 14, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Tell me aboout boot sequence in bios setup


The system BIOS is what starts the computer running when you turn it on. The following are the steps that a typical boot sequence involves. Of course this will vary by the manufacturer of your hardware, BIOS, etc., and especially by what peripherals you have in the PC. Here is what generally happens when you turn on your system power:
The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.

When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
The BIOS displays its startup screen.
The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Dec 15, 2010 | HP Computers & Internet

1 Answer

What happens inside the PC between turning the power on and you see the desktop on the screen?


  1. The internal power supply turns on and initializes. The power supply takes some time until it can generate reliable power for the rest of the computer, and having it turn on prematurely could potentially lead to damage. Therefore, the chipset will generate a reset signal to the processor (the same as if you held the reset button down for a while on your case) until it receives the Power Good signal from the power supply.
  2. When the reset button is released, the processor will be ready to start executing. When the processor first starts up, it is suffering from amnesia; there is nothing at all in the memory to execute. Of course processor makers know this will happen, so they pre-program the processor to always look at the same place in the system BIOS ROM for the start of the BIOS boot program. This is normally location FFFF0h, right at the end of the system memory. They put it there so that the size of the ROM can be changed without creating compatibility problems. Since there are only 16 bytes left from there to the end of conventional memory, this location just contains a "jump" instruction telling the processor where to go to find the real BIOS startup program.
  3. The BIOS performs the power-on self test (POST). If there are any fatal errors, the boot process stops. POST beep codes can be found in this area of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  4. The BIOS looks for the video card. In particular, it looks for the video card's built in BIOS program and runs it. This BIOS is normally found at location C000h in memory. The system BIOS executes the video card BIOS, which initializes the video card. Most modern cards will display information on the screen about the video card. (This is why on a modern PC you usually see something on the screen about the video card before you see the messages from the system BIOS itself).
  5. The BIOS then looks for other devices' ROMs to see if any of them have BIOSes. Normally, the IDE/ATA hard disk BIOS will be found at C8000h and executed. If any other device BIOSes are found, they are executed as well.
  6. The BIOS displays its startup screen.
  7. The BIOS does more tests on the system, including the memory count-up test which you see on the screen. The BIOS will generally display a text error message on the screen if it encounters an error at this point; these error messages and their explanations can be found in this part of the Troubleshooting Expert.
  8. The BIOS performs a "system inventory" of sorts, doing more tests to determine what sort of hardware is in the system. Modern BIOSes have many automatic settings and will determine memory timing (for example) based on what kind of memory it finds. Many BIOSes can also dynamically set hard drive parameters and access modes, and will determine these at roughly this time. Some will display a message on the screen for each drive they detect and configure this way. The BIOS will also now search for and label logical devices (COM and LPT ports).
  9. If the BIOS supports the Plug and Play standard, it will detect and configure Plug and Play devices at this time and display a message on the screen for each one it finds. See here for more details on how PnP detects devices and assigns resources.
  10. The BIOS will display a summary screen about your system's configuration. Checking this page of data can be helpful in diagnosing setup problems, although it can be hard to see because sometimes it flashes on the screen very quickly before scrolling off the top.
  11. The BIOS begins the search for a drive to boot from. Most modern BIOSes contain a setting that controls if the system should first try to boot from the floppy disk (A:) or first try the hard disk (C:). Some BIOSes will even let you boot from your CD-ROM drive or other devices, depending on the boot sequence BIOS setting.
  12. Having identified its target boot drive, the BIOS looks for boot information to start the operating system boot process. If it is searching a hard disk, it looks for a master boot record at cylinder 0, head 0, sector 1 (the first sector on the disk); if it is searching a floppy disk, it looks at the same address on the floppy disk for a volume boot sector.
  13. If it finds what it is looking for, the BIOS starts the process of booting the operating system, using the information in the boot sector. At this point, the code in the boot sector takes over from the BIOS. The DOS boot process is described in detail here. If the first device that the system tries (floppy, hard disk, etc.) is not found, the BIOS will then try the next device in the boot sequence, and continue until it finds a bootable device.
  14. If no boot device at all can be found, the system will normally display an error message and then freeze up the system. What the error message is depends entirely on the BIOS, and can be anything from the rather clear "No boot device available" to the very cryptic "NO ROM BASIC - SYSTEM HALTED". This will also happen if you have a bootable hard disk partition but forget to set it active.

Nov 02, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I'm facing major problem of active desktop recovery.Also I'm unable to restore my active desktop.


If all fails, then the last resort would be Reformat Your Computer. Save Everything. When you do a Reformat, all data is lost.
I found this on the web. You can click on the link to see it more in view.
http://www.ehow.com/how_5039946_reformat-windows-vista-computer.html
Step 1 ATTENTION!

Reformatting a computer will reset it to the factor image, all data must be backed up or it WILL be lost. There are several reasons to reformat a hard drive. A few reasons include but are not limited to: driver issues, virus, cleaning up, getting rid of the computer, etc.

Step 2 Recovery Disk Creator
Every new windows vista owner should know that the new computers are not supplied with recovery disks anymore. The manufacturer allows the user to create one set of disks upon the purchase of a new machine. It is important to create the disks early as driver issues and viruses may arise. In order to create recovery disks on windows vista you want to click on the start menu. Next, type in recovery in the Start Search option area. Next, click on recovery disk creation and follow the process. It will require that you have about 3 dvds or about 7 cds to create the recovery disks.
REFORMATING HARD DRIVE!

Once the recovery disks have been made reformatting windows vista is quite simple. Insert the recovery disks into the cd/dvd tray on the machine. You are now going to want to turn the computer off. When the computer has turned off, go ahead and turn it back on. A screen should pop up asking you whether you want to boot from Hard Drive or Disk. Choose the disk option. After you make it this far it is a downhill process. Next you follow the on-screen instruction make sure you reformat the machine, not recover it.

Good Luck :0)

Apr 13, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional SP3 Full...

1 Answer

How to restore my acer aspire 5515 to default mode like i bought it


Reformatting your computer, save everything. You will loose all of your DATA.

I found this on the web. You can click on the link to see it more in view.
http://www.ehow.com/how_5039946_reformat-windows-vista-computer.html
Step 1 ATTENTION!

Reformatting a computer will reset it to the factor image, all data must be backed up or it WILL be lost. There are several reasons to reformat a hard drive. A few reasons include but are not limited to: driver issues, virus, cleaning up, getting rid of the computer, etc.

Step 2 Recovery Disk Creator
Every new windows vista owner should know that the new computers are not supplied with recovery disks anymore. The manufacturer allows the user to create one set of disks upon the purchase of a new machine. It is important to create the disks early as driver issues and viruses may arise. In order to create recovery disks on windows vista you want to click on the start menu. Next, type in recovery in the Start Search option area. Next, click on recovery disk creation and follow the process. It will require that you have about 3 dvds or about 7 cds to create the recovery disks.
REFORMATING HARD DRIVE!

Once the recovery disks have been made reformatting windows vista is quite simple. Insert the recovery disks into the cd/dvd tray on the machine. You are now going to want to turn the computer off. When the computer has turned off, go ahead and turn it back on. A screen should pop up asking you whether you want to boot from Hard Drive or Disk. Choose the disk option. After you make it this far it is a downhill process. Next you follow the on-screen instruction make sure you reformat the machine, not recover it.

Good Luck :0)

Apr 11, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Getting out of the initial set up


First try to Boot to Last Known Good Configuration.. do this by pressing F8 upon bootup...look at the prompt screen for the option mentioned OR

Attempt to boot up in Safe Mode....
Do This by pressing F8 Upon bootup, it will take you to a black Safe Mode Options screen... once there choose the first option.. boot into Safe Mode Only.. If you are able to boot into windows that way,, you can then check for problems... Like checking the device manager for errors, Check the Status of your hard drive.. etc.

Jun 04, 2008 | Dell Latitude C400 Notebook

2 Answers

I have a bad virus and need to crash my hard driveand relaod


There is no virus in existence other then bios viruses that can survive a reformat restore.
find your restore disks or call the original manufacturer to obtain the original software. 
if you do not have a name brand machine. you will need to reformat yourself and re install the OS manually.

May 01, 2008 | Computers & Internet

Not finding what you are looking for?
Gateway GT4016 Desktop PC Logo

Related Topics:

26 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Gateway Computers & Internet Experts

Les Dickinson
Les Dickinson

Level 3 Expert

18394 Answers

Prashant M
Prashant M

Level 3 Expert

2260 Answers

Matthew Spark
Matthew Spark

Level 3 Expert

1066 Answers

Are you a Gateway Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...