Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-P200 Digital Camera

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Which setting should I use?

Can someone help me please. I would like to use my camera to take photos of my children whilst they are playing sports and my new puppy whilse she is running towards me - but each photo I take is badly blurred. the background is fine but the child/dog is fuzzy. What setting should I be using for action photos?

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Re: Which setting should I use?

Hello, there is a link for the user manual: and for some FAQ: Best regards, Arpi

Posted on Jul 21, 2007

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Try setting the camera's scene mode to the Sports mode. Even if the children aren't actually engaging in sports, they're often moving as if they are. The camera will attempt to freeze the action, catching the children at whatever they're doing.

If you want to deliberately blur the action to give a sense of movement then you'll want something else. Try the Scenery mode. A big advantage of digital photography is that the pictures are free. Experiment. See what works best for you and the impression you want to deliver.

Mar 02, 2013 | Panasonic Digital Cameras

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I have played around with the settings of my nikon s26oo coolpix camera and now it is taking very bad phot'os. Can Someone please help me to get back to the default settings??

To reset the camera back to the default setting, remove the battery for 15 mins, replace the battery then open the camera's Menu and set the Date & Time.

Feb 22, 2013 | Nikon COOLPIX Digital Cameras

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When taking night sport shots I don't think I have the right settings for clear photos they are coming out tooo blurry. Help!!! the photos are grainy also and dark. Could you send me the correct setting...

More likely you don't have enough light for clear photos. There's not too much you can do about this, since you probably can't add more light to the stadium or arena and the action is too far away for your flash.

Since the low light is going to force a rather slow shutter speed on you, you need to stabilize the camera. Use a tripod or monopod. That won't stop the athletes from blurring, but at least the setting will be sharper. Alternatively you can try panning with the motion, freezing the athlete and blurring the background.

A faster lens will get you a couple of additional stops, but as such lenses can cost $2000 and more, unless you're taking pictures for Sports Illustrated...

Sep 11, 2010 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

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I find that the shutter speed is too slow when trying to capture photos of children and pets. I have set the camera to sport mode but there us no difference.

Its not configurable. You will have to use it as it is. Try to hold the camera still while taking the photo and after clicking the photo hold it for extra 1 second.

Appreciate a good rating from you.

Aug 01, 2009 | Digital Cameras

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I don't know how to change the iso setting for a sports action photo. Please describe in detail. I have no manual.

For sports action, if you want to freeze the action with minimal blur, set the ISO to a higher number such as 400, or 800. A faster "film speed" will allow the camera to have a quicker shutter speed. If you want to blur the subject to denote motion, pick a slower ISO number and you'll be able to take sports photos with a bit of blur in them for effect! If you need help actually setting the ISO for your camera, please let us know what is the make and model of your camera and we'll fix ya up! K

Jun 07, 2009 | Digital Cameras

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Nikon D60 Digital SLR--Slow Shutter Speed

Your're probably using a flash with TTL disabled. So 1/200 is the highest sync possible with that kind of flash. Did you try removing the flash off the body and setting faster shutter speeds?

Apr 28, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm lens

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Blurry photos on the Sony DSC 170

This issue often is related to lighting, subjects in the foreground, and the lack of optimal settings when using the Easy / Auto function.

First, you should look at subject matter.  If you have the camera set to Easy / Auto, it will focus for you.  This is good if the subject of the photo is the only thing (or the nearest thing) in the frame, however if there is anything else closer to the camera, it will assume that the nearest object is the one being photographed, and will adjust accordingly.  Although it may be something large such as a chair, sofa, table or even a houseplant, it may also be focusing on something as small as a child's toy.  If you must use the Easy / Auto function when photographing your children, make sure that your children are the only (or the closest) subjects in the photo, and the camera ought to set the focus on them.

The second issue is lighting.  Even when using the easiest settings on this camera, you still must make sure that the lighting and flash are optimal.  The flash, for instance, can be set to three different intensities, as not all situations require the same amount of additional light.  Make sure that if photographing indoors, you have either a decent amount of lighting, or the flash set to add the appropriate amount of additional light.  If the area photographed is too dark / bright, the camera (when set to the easiest settings, without any additional specifications from the user) will have difficulty finding (or choosing) the main subject of the photograph.  This is why you will occasionally see multiple little green squares, when it looks (to you) as though your children ought to be the primary --and only-- focus of the photo.  In simple terms, the camera is confused, and will choose what stands out as the main subject.

Remember that although this camera is technically of the point-and-click variety, one of the things that makes it stand out as a digital camera is the ability to adjust the settings as the situation dictates.  I suggest learning what each of the camera settings are used for (it seems daunting at first, but I assure you that it isn't as difficult as it first appears to be... remember, this camera is technically for those who have little-to-no experience with photogrpahy) and applying the available settings to the photos you take.  I am able to turn on my Sony Cyber-Shot DSC W170, adjust the settings to the situation, and photograph my children in less than two seconds more than it would take to turn it on and set it to Auto.  I have taken photos with this camera that have come out beautifully enough to print at the actual stated 8"x10" size (which is rare for a point-and-click), by adjusting only the ISO and flash (and nothing more) to accomodate the setting.

If you are looking for strictly a point-and-click camera that you do not need to set anything on (essentially the digital version of a quality 35mm disposable camera), there are some excellent ones on the market today.  I would reccommend the Sony Cyber-Shot DSC W170 to those who are looking for a camera that is slightly above "beginner" level (though well below "expert" level) cameras.  My husband purchased this for me as a birthday gift, to have on hand for quick photo-taking (quicker than setting up a tripod and adjusting my primary camera) while out and about with our children.  

I have been able to take some very beautiful photos with this camera (three outdoor photos were nice enough to sell), however I have only made use of the Easy / Auto settings a few times, while playing with the settings after first receiving the camera.  There are other beginner-level point-and-click cameras that, in my opinion, take far better digital photos than photos taken using the Easy / Auto functions of the Sony Cyber-Shot DSC W170.

This camera was designed for consumers who make use of the various settings, to ensure an optimal photographic experience (much like the difference between a professional photographer's 35mm camera and a basic 35mm camera).  For this reason, anyone looking for a camera that is an easy, simple point-and-click (i.e. you turn it on, take the photos, and that's it), I would suggest shopping around for a simpler camera.  There are many excellent ones that are designed to be quick and easy, and take good quality photos, without needing to adjust anything.

Dec 26, 2008 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W170 Digital Camera

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Mavica FD95 and Sports Photography.

Basically you bought the wrong camera for your needs. The 95 can not do well under the conditions you describe. The ISO is fixed and to low for the amount of light you have available. The viewfinder begins to darken after the lens is wide open and the shutter speed is increased further. There are three possible cures. More light, not possible in your situation, faster lens or higher ISO, again not possible with your camera. Maybe you could convince them to play in the dayight. :)

Sep 13, 2005 | Sony Mavica MVC-FD95 Digital Camera

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