Question about Nikon D7000 Digital Camera

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Slow shutter speed on D7000

What ever shutter speed setting used, a consistently slow shutter sound and mirror blackout achieved.

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The camera requires service by camera tech, not a user fix problem.

Posted on Jan 25, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Do not seem to have it set up correctly, very slow

The D100 was the first SLR digital camera that Nikon made. In its day it was awesome, top of the line technology. Today, it's hard to even find them for sale because they are so old. I have a D100 and it is a great camera but you have to be patient with it - it is a grandfather now. It is slow. It is a fantastic camera and you can still shoot great action shots but you have to use a bit more planning then you would on a more new camera. Just be patient with it and treat it with care and it will produce images you will love and be proud of.

Posted on Aug 29, 2009

HyeProfile
  • 35 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon D60 Digital SLR--Slow Shutter Speed

Your're probably using a flash with TTL disabled. So 1/200 is the highest sync possible with that kind of flash. Did you try removing the flash off the body and setting faster shutter speeds?

Posted on Aug 05, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Nikon D40 shutter speed problem

The D40 will not take great photos of an indoor event without blurring or noise. You need a fast lens and a high ISO using the popup flash or on camera flash would be ideal but some of these events you can not use flash. All these images I shot with a Nikon D40. http://www.facebook.com/home.php?src=fftb#/pages/Keller-TX/Raving-Design/78762448229?v=photos&ref=ts Learn to use the camera for ur events. Experiment it's all about trial and error. Ray

Posted on Jan 22, 2010

  • 65 Answers

SOURCE: Nikon D60 - Very slow shutter speed (2-4

turn the dial to P mode and do flash photography this should solve it.

Posted on Feb 12, 2010

drifterK
  • 4924 Answers

SOURCE: Night photography. Shutter speed is slow. Don't

this is normal cause of the flash charging and the adjusting it makes ..it has to delay at least 3 sec.

Posted on May 02, 2010

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Related Questions:

1 Answer

Why would my Auto focus mirror not folding up completely.


The mirror is designed to fully swing from top to bottom with out any interference unless something was jammed inside. If you are shooting with the lens off and watching the mirror only partially open something is jammed and needs repair. To test this put the camera in Manual mode ( M on the mode selector dial) Set the shutter speed to 1/4 of a second and press the shutter button. Having a slow shutter will allow you to see if it is fully opening and closing.
If you are making this assumption based on seeing images that have only a portion of the frame exposed, then the most likely scenario is you are taking pictures with the flash on at a shutter speed greater than 1/250 of a second. This causes the flash to fire before the shutter is fully open and therefore only part of the frame is exposed. Google "Shutter Sync Speed".
Good Luck

Feb 27, 2015 | Canon EOS 1100D / Rebel T3 Digital Camera

2 Answers

I have a D60 and when using my new lighting kit if the aperture is faster than1/200 it creates a blackout across part of the image due to the mirror. Any solutions?


It's not the aperture, it's the shutter speed. It's also not the mirror, but the shutter.
The camera's fastest shutter sync speed is 1/200. You must use a shutter speed no faster than that. Due to the construction of the shutter, the frame is not fully exposed simultaneously at faster speeds and thus part of the image is blacked out.

Using a flash, the amount of light is controlled almost exclusively by the flash; the exposure is controlled by the aperture and the shutter speed is all but irrelevant.

Feb 15, 2013 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My shutter speed is very slow on auto/scene mode.


It may be a firmware issue, try going to the Nikon support website and check for downloads/updates for your camera

http://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/list/p/19

Apr 24, 2011 | Nikon D7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

All run well (shutter-exposure-drive) except for mirror


it sounds like its set up for a very slow shutter speed
ie:30sec's? and your getting triger happy trying to rush it to take the photo and get it over with, check when film speed its set on and what shutter speed its set to,and stop poking the mirror about or its going to cost you big time bucks getting it fixed,

Mar 05, 2010 | Contax 167 MT 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter drag problems


Check to see if somehow the "noise reduction" setting is on. This in effect takes two separate exposures on each shutter release, so it (sometimes) doubles the time the mirror is up. I'm not sure where it is in the menus on a D300.

Also, just a terminology point, but the "shutter" in this camera is a combination of the mirror (what we usually call the shutter) and the electronics which samples the sensor for a limited time. It's a little like the mechanical shutter on a film camera that was behind the mirror....back in the day when they made them from titanium.

The "so what" of this is that even if it sounds like it's not releasing as fast as it used to, the exposure can still be accurate if the electronics are sampling correctly. It's only when moving to slow exposures that the mirror speed/up time makes a difference.

Jul 15, 2009 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

2 Answers

D300 long shutter delay


are you using mirror lock-up or live-view feature?

Jun 02, 2009 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D100: Lazy mirror return.


The reason the mirror is acting up is because the Shutter is going bad under slow shutter speeds. > The motor which drives the shutter charge and the mirror up and down is the same .

Apr 07, 2009 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Digiscope


Hey timpo,
I would definitely use some kind of remote release since even the smallest amount of camera shake (pressing the shutter button) can cause blurry images in high magnification images. At the type of magnifications usually involved in digiscopeing the depth of field of your images will be greatly reduced and you will need to set the camera to a smaller aperture than usual, which should result in slower shutter speeds. I would definitely have the camera set to manual exposure mode so you can control both the shutter and the aperture although aperture priority should also work well. I would not set the camera to a higher iso since you will lose quality, and since I am assuming you are using a tripod slow shutter speeds should not be an issue. Any movement by the subject will blur the subject if you are using slow shutter speeds so if this becomes an issue you can set the camera to a wider aperture at the loss of depth of field to achieve a faster shutter speed. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 27, 2008 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera settings


I'm not sure what you mean by milky, but I'll assume you want it to kind of blend together...you want to use TV mode and slow the shutter speed way down and play with it in different shutter speeds to get the proper exposure and "milky" effect you are trying to achieve.

Hope this helps!

Sep 25, 2007 | Canon PowerShot S5 IS Digital Camera

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