Question about Nikon Coolpix 4300 Digital Camera

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Pictures are too green

The pictures seem to have all the proper colors, but too much green. I can do some post-processing color balancing, but that isn't simple or satisfactory. The camera has a white balance feature, but only in manual modes, and automatic is the mode I mostly use.

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Re: Pictures are too green

This could be a CCD problem - there have been recalls for some models. Go to the Nikon web site and the Technical Support Team.

Posted on Jul 15, 2007

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How to fix green colored pictures

Camera white balance is set for flourescent light. Change setting back to Auto.

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Picturess are too green

there are advanced color correction modes,
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Keep your shooting distance inside of 2ft to 3ft, depending on
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If you are using only one light, considering adding another light
(dual lights) or/and external flash accessory. The ideal
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Consider purchasing the SeaLife Wide Angle Lens (SL975). The
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For SeaLife camera with external light accessory (No external flash):
1) Set the camera's scene mode to Sea mode or Snorkel mode
2) Change camera's PHOTO and VIDEO White Balance
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For other underwater camera brands:
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Problem with color on my lumix dmc-fh25 camera

Set the camera's white balance to match the lighting. Most indoor lighting has a yellowish cast to it, while by default cameras are set for sunlight.

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When I take pictures now with my A85 the tint is green, my pictures have more of a green tint. is there a way of adjusting the color.

Sounds like the camera was adjusted for flourescent lighting. The PowerShot should have a menu with various Lighting scenarios such as natural, outdoor, nighttime, sepia, etc. I would check this first. It should be easy to find. If you can't adjust the color properly with these pre-set options, there may be an RGB adjuster although I doubt it. You can certainly use a photo editor on your computer easily as well to adjust the color balance easily. If you don't use Photoshop there are free online photo editors such as You want to look for Color Balance and an RGB slide bar, it is quite fun to play around with.

May 10, 2011 | Canon PowerShot A85 Digital Camera

1 Answer

All the pictures have green tint? What is wrong?

Most likely you have changed the "Color Balance" setting. Usually this would be on "auto", and the cameras do a pretty good job of picking the right balance. Sounds like you have fixed it to some value. Go through all of the settings to what it is set at.

Mar 28, 2010 | Canon PowerShot A75 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am a surgeon when I take pictures of muscle or bloody objects the red color seems to melt and the red is overly saturated and all sharpness and definition to the photo is lost usually taken with a...

The Fuji S2 sensor is noted for this red sensitivity. Here's a few different approaches to getting the shot with the S2, all of which require some experimentation.

1. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Underexpose the shot. Progressively change the exposure compensation downward until when checking the histogram, the red channel does not show saturation at the high end. Advantages: this is the simplest approach to getting the picture. Disadvantages: the S2 already had a fairly limited dynamic range, and this will make things worse for the parts of the photo that are not red. For the surgical setting and use of a ringflash, this may not be much of a disadvantage, since a lot of the stuff of interest will be red, and ringflash illumination generally is of lower contrast than directional lighting.

2. Set the "Color" and "Tone" Function options to "ORG". Use a custom white balance. The idea here is to have the camera adjust the red channel sensitivity itself, and leave the blue and green channels alone. To do this, start with several sheets of white paper and a red or pink marker or highlighter. Scribble with the marker across a sheet, then use that to set a custom white balance. Take a test shot of the red stuff that has been problematic, and see whether the histogram for the red channel shows that there is no saturation at the high end. Repeat this with progressively more red or pink on each sheet used to set the custom white balance until you find the custom white balance that takes enough of the edge off the red channel response. Alternative: I just tried out making a gradient across an 8.5x11" sheet of paper going from white to about 30% red saturation. I can set more or less red adjustment in a custom white balance just by pointing the camera at different parts of the page. This seems to work OK for me. Advantage: can allow the full dynamic range of the sensor to be used. Disadvantages: the experimentation period is likely to take a while to get the best results, and the final images are unlikely to look completely natural.

3. Set the "Color" Function option to "B/W". Use a green or cyan filter on the lens to cut the amount that the red color channel contributes to the final image. Advantages: this is fairly simple as an approach. A similar post-processing technique can be applied to the photos that you already have, by nulling out the red channel contribution and desaturating the blue and green channels to produce a grayscale image. Disadvantages: you lose the color information entirely. Since much of what you want information about is colored red anyway, the organs are likely to appear quite dark when only taking the blue and green channel contributions to the image.

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1 Answer

Displays green color image/screen

When did you get this message? It seems like you have set the White Balance of the camera wrong. Set it to Auto White Balance to eliminate this problem. Use Daylight White Balance when shooting in bright daylight so as to eliminate any color cast in the image.

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2 Answers

Green pictures panasonic fz7

Check the WHITE BALANCE settings and the COLOR EFFECTS settings (marked as W. BALANCE and COL. EFFECTS when MENU is pressed).

When you got to the MENU setting, press up or down arrow until you reached either selection, press the left arrow, and you'll see several options under the selected function. In WHITE BALANCE, there's an option whether you'll be shooting under sunny or cloudy skies, tungsten or flourescent lighting, and an option to select Auto or Manually set White Balance. This affects the over all color tone as it compensates the color correction depending on your shooting conditions. Fluorescent lighting for example exhibits blue spectrum, thus setting White Balance to FLUORESCENT will add warm or yellow tones to the photo. Tungsten lighting and sunny conditions exhibits yellow lighting, and setting to the White Balance on this mode will add cool or bluish tone to the picture.

Same with COLOR EFFECTS: settings include WARM, COOL, SEPIA or BLACK AND WHITE (gray scale).

Chances are, you have accidentally set the WHITE BALANCE or COLOR EFFECTS to any of these. To see if this is the problem, try shooting under SIMPLE MODE (Marked with a HEART icon at the rotary dial on top right of the DMC-FZ7). If the problem goes away, then it is with the WHITE BALANCE and the COLOR EFFECTS settings. Try setting the COLOR EFFECTS to "OFF", and the WHITE BALANCE to "AUTO".

If all else fails, then you got a problem with the image sensor of your Panasonic DMC-FZ7 Digicam

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Manila, Philippines
Site Creator, TEENMODELS2007

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1 Answer

Saturation of unrealistic color

It is definite CCD chip problem. If you are within warranty period, send it back quick. They probably replace with other unit because the parts are not available for the product. Good luck.

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2 Answers

Nikon D70 Help

I don't think there is really any such thing as a 100% "natural picture". What your eyes see and what film or a sensor "see" are not the same. All photos are manipulated to some degree whether it be from the type of film or the digital "modes" you use. If you would have shot with a film such as Velvia, the greens may have been more "stellar" or maybe too green. There are a number of settings you can use to get the results more to your liking with a D70, or shoot NEF and post process to your liking. Your exposure will make a difference so you may want to bracket.

Sep 14, 2005 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera

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