Question about Brother PE770 Computerized Sewing Machine

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Why are no embroidery stitches showing up, the needle moves in and out of the fabric but no stitches stay

Is it because the fabric or stabilizer is not thick enough? It use to embroider on the same sort of fabric and stabilizer but now the needle just moves up and down through the fabric with out leaving a stitch. is it because it isn't catching the bobbin thread? Help!

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  • Brother Master
  • 7,365 Answers

Here are some suggestions, if the suggestions don't help then the
machine needs to be checked to see if there is a adjustment or
timing problem
1. try changing the needle
2. try rethreading the machine top and bobbin
3. make sure the bobbin is turned the right way in the bobbin
case

Posted on Jan 18, 2013

6 Suggested Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 9 Answers

SOURCE: NEEDLE KEEPS COMING UNTHREADED WILL NOT CATCH IN FABRIC

Make sure you are threading the machine correctly and it has the proper tension. Also check the bobbin the thread has to go thru the little lash

Posted on Jun 14, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Lower Bobbin not threading

the thread will not catch the bobbin and the feeder will not turn

Posted on Jun 21, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Thread tangles under throat plate while embroidering

Take the cover off or at least enough to blow the gear drives out around the area of the thread cutter. We use a air pump that you use to blow up an air mattress with. You will also need tweezers to pick out the thread etc. that gets wrapped around the gear and in the teeth. What happens is the gear drive gets clogged and does not turn freely.
Mary

Posted on Jul 26, 2009

bargainbox
  • 1388 Answers

SOURCE: Huge loops on back of fabric!

Please TRY the solution BEFORE giving your considered rating.
Specific detail on bobbin case adjustment (with picture) near halfway down reply, the remainder will help you achieve a balance of top and bottom tensions.

Ensure that all is clean and free of lint and jams, this is the most likely cause....now for tension troubleshooting .......

This solution is for tension problems...if you cannot form any sort of stitch, the issue is quite different, so please let me know if you need a different problem solved.....

It is quite long, but just work through each section in order.

The "knotting up" can reveal a lot. If you have loose threads on one side or the other, the tension on the opposite side will be the culprit.

QUICK SUMMARY FIRST:
Ensure sharp new needle,
Thread guides and Bobbin are Clean & Clear of lint
Set Top Tesion to 4 ....then....
Balance Bobbin to suit.

TOP THREAD TENSION:
If the looping threads are on the underside as you sew, it is the top tension. Top tension ought to be between 4 & 6 (this variation to allow for the different weights of fabric in your projects).

IS YOUR NEEDLE SHARP ?
If you are using a needle that has seen quite a deal of work, or you suspect it may be blunt, change it for a new one !

TOP TENSION & GUIDES:
Make sure that when you thread the machine the presser foot is up so the thread goes between the discs and not to one side, top tension between 4 and 6, and that you have threaded through all the guides, including the last one, usually on the needle arm, just above the needle clamp.

It may be there is lint trapped between the discs, this will keep them slightly apart and reduce the actual tension, sometimes dramatically.

If tensions appear correct, and the thread is definitely in the channel between the discs, but still too loose and looping, try raising presser foot and remove your thread.

Now, with a 2" (50mm) wide strip piece of fabric 8 - 10" (20 - 25cm) moistened with methylated or denatured spirit, gently insert the fabric strip and clean between the discs with a see saw / to and fro action.

In the worst cases, gentle use of a needle to pick & remove the jam may be necessary, but be very gentle and make sure the tension is set at Zero and the presser foot is raised, (to disengage tension plates).... do not gouge or score the plates, they need a polished surface to work correctly.

BOBBIN TENSION:
Far less common, but if the loose threads are on the top, it is bobbin tension that is loose, it too may have lint in the spring and be giving a "false" tension.

I would not recommend fiddling with bobbin tension without good reason, it may end up with missing small screws and spring pieces, however, you can take the needle plate off to clean
the hook race area (where bobbin case sits)

...this is just good housekeeping, my wife does this every time she replaces the bobbin....

just take it out and clean the bobbin case and the fixed metal hook race with a small brush to remove lint. If there is a significant amount of lint, use a vacuum and small brush to get the worst.

Then wipe all this area with a cloth or cotton bud (Q tip) moistened (not soaked) with methylated spirit, especially if there appears to be fine dirty deposits....oil and lint combine to conspire against you.

If it seems likely that you ......really ....do .....actually .....need .....to adjust the bobbin case, first check there is no lint trapped in the metal spring where the thread is tensioned.

TOP LOADER:
Drop-in Bobbin case will look similar to this image with the tension screw in the middle of the metalwork....

4c76dc1.jpg ...the other screw at one end is holding it all together, so beware....it is not a tragedy to undo the whole lot and clean it, but very gingerly and lay the bits out in sequence and orientation, or you risk tearing your hair out !

FRONT LOADER:
....this is a bobbin case from a front loading machine and works in a very similar fashion to the top loader with drop in bobbin, again, if you dismantle it, take care so you can put it all
back properly.
165ca5c.jpg FINISHING UP
GETTING THE BALANCE RIGHT:
When you are certain there's no trapped lint in top tension or bobbin, set the top tension to 4 and the bobbin tension to a point where you just begin to feel resistance.

Try using good quality thread of contrasting colours so you can more easily spot the changes.

Set your zigzag to one width less than maximum (eg. 5 of 6 ...or... 4 of 5 etc) and sew a sample for a few inches and check the result.... adjust the bobbin tension screw very little at
a time, perhaps 1/16 of a turn.

You may find you are playing with this balance for some little while and if you are putting the needleplate on and off each time begin to think it cannot be correct to do this.....BUT....it is,
and eventually, you do get a "feel" for the correct tension and then it happens quite quickly.....as a user you won't be doing it very often unless there is lint built up (or are there small hands at work around the house !?!?!)

OTHER ISSUES:
If you live near the ocean as we do, salt air can play havoc with metalwork inside and out, so to help minimise this, keep a few small packets of dessicant (silica gel) in your machine
case....no case ? then make some sort of cover !

Same applies in any damp or humid environment, keep your machine dry and dust free.

Budget for a proper full service every couple of years (more often if heavily used) and if you don't use your machine for a few years, be aware that old oil will dry out and combining with
dust and form a "clag" like glue (another reason for some sort of cover, even a teatowel !)

FINALLY, A WORD ON THREAD:
If it is worth spending the time, energy and money on making something that you would like to give lasting enjoyment......use quality thread, .......it may seem to cost a little more at the
time, but the results, ease of use and added longevity will be worth the extra, and as a bonus, your tension troubles may be fewer and further between, because there is a more consistent diameter with good thread, and less compensating to be done by your tension plates and less thread breaks !

bargainbox.com.au

Posted on Aug 02, 2009

  • 96 Answers

SOURCE: stitching loose. won't thread the fabric

try to rethread the machine all the way back to the spool of thread and check the top and bottom tensions on scrap of same fabric

Posted on Dec 13, 2009

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Do I need the embroidery hoop? does it connect to the thing in the back of the machine and moves areouns?


  1. What do I need to get started at free machine embroidery?
    • A zigzag sewing machine with a drop-feed control. (In other words, you have to be able to lower the feed dogs so they don't try to feed the fabric.) It's nice if you can vary the width of your zigzag stitches too.
    • An embroidery foot or needle with embroidery spring. An embroidery foot helps by holding the fabric down against the throat plate while nevertheless being minimal - it lets you see what you're doing because it has very little surface area. You can alternatively get a needle that has a kind of spring built into it, and the spring holds the fabric in place. These can be nice in that they're even more minimal than an embroidery foot, but they're also relatively expensive and if it breaks you have to replace the whole thing instead of using an ordinary cheap needle with the special embroidery foot. If you use the needle with spring, you don't use a presser foot while you embroider.
    • An embroidery hoop. There are two primary kinds of embroidery hoops on the market. The old-fashioned kind, usually made of wood, has an outer ring and an innter ring. You loosen the outer ring, separate the rings, place the fabric over the inner ring, place the outer ring over the fabric, tighten the outer ring, and pull the fabric tight in the hoop. With the modern type hoop, you squeeze a pair of handles on the inner ring to remove it, place the fabric over the outer ring, place the inner ring (still squeezed) into place and release the handles. The more modern hoop is faster and easier. The old-fashioned hoop provides better tension on the fabric.
    • Stabilizer. This helps prevent puckering and slipping while you're embroidering. There are a variety of types out there. Some are papery and are torn away from the embroidery when you're done. Only use that on the back side of the embroidery, as it's almost impossible to get it all off. Others are also papery and also tear away but are dissolvable in cold water, leaving only a few easy-to-remove fibers in the embroidery. Your authors like this type of stabilizer. There is also a transparent plastic-like stabilizer which dissolves completely in water. Your authors have this but haven't tried it yet, but hear it's very nice. It's expensive though.
    • Fabric... of course. Make sure that your embroidery hoop fits on the piece you're going to embroider on. If the piece is to be small, you may want to embroider before cutting the piece from the fabric.
    • Thread. Contrary to popular belief, you can use ordinary polyester all-purpose thread to embroider, but it can weaken the fabric you're embroidering on. (If you do use polyester, you may want to fuse some interfacing to the back of your embroidery when you're done.) There is plenty of gorgeous 100% rayon embroidery thread available.
    • Thread for the bobbin. This won't be seen on the surface, so you can use anything you want. Trying to find a way to get rid of that day-glo orange thread you can't remember why you bought? Stick it in the bobbin when you embroider. Some embroiderers feel that it's best to use a softer thread (like 100% cotton) in the bobbin so as to reduce the possibility that the bobbin thread will break the embroidery thread, but your authors haven't had a problem with this to date.
  2. How do I prepare the machine and fabric for free machine embroidery? Drop the feed dogs and set the stitch length at zero. (If you can't set the stitch length at zero, don't panic, it's not that important.) Install the fabric in the embroidery hoop (with any stabilizer[s] you intend to use) so that the surface of the fabric is at the *bottom* of the hoop. (Note that if you're used to embroidering or cross stich by hand, this means you're putting the fabric in the hoop backwards.) When you place the hoop on the table such that the fabric surface rests on the table, the right side of the fabric should face up. Install the embroidery foot or special embroidery needle with spring on the sewing machine. If you're using the special needle, remove the presser foot. Place the embroidery hoop in the sewing area. (Some machines can't lift the presser foot enough to admit some hoops - you may have to remove the presser foot temporarily, position the hoop, and then re-install the presser foot if you're using one.) Set the sewing machine for a straight stitch. Reduce the upper tension until stitches interlock below the fabric instead of above or inside it.
  3. How do I lock the thread at the beginning and end of my embroidery so it doesn't begin to unravel? Make several stitches in place to lock the thread.

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Once I set up my design card and select design, the needle moves


Hi, and welcome to FixYa. If I understand your problem, the needle goes in and out of your fabric, and the embroidery hoop moves, but the machine does not actually start embroidering your design right away....did I get it right? If have time to answer a few questions, I can give more accurate instructions.

  1. How long have you had your machine?
  2. How long have you been doing machine embroidery?
  3. Do you have a manual for your machine?
  4. Look at the back side of your design - do you see lots of bobbin thread, or hardly any?
  5. Have you taken lessons for your machine or for embroidery?
  6. When your design is finished, can you where the machine skipped stitches?
Here a couple of things you can try (if you have already):

  • Make sure you use an embroidery needle, not a universal. In most cases, you should use a size 90. Change your needle after each project. A blunt need can cause your machine to skip embroidery stitches anywhere in the design.
  • Rewind or replace your bobbin. Make sure you use bobbin thread in your bobbin when you embroider - it is thinner and gives you better tension. If pre-wound embroidery bobbins are compatible with your machine, I recommend that you try one and compare the result with designs sewn using the bobbin thread you've been using.
  • Normally, you should loosen your tension a little bit when you embroider. When you look at the back side of your embroidery, you should see more bobbin thread than embroidery thread.
I owned an embroidery business for several years, and I have six different embroidery machines of my own - so with a little more info from you, I think I can help.


Feb 03, 2009 | PfaFF Creative 7570

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