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What range should I put my target to air rifle shooting?

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Most people go for the 50 yard range.

Posted on Jan 17, 2013

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1 Answer

Good day my is Wade my Swiss Arms air rifle has got no power when shooting.


there is no air rifle suitable for south african hunting conditions.

Sep 09, 2016 | The Optics

1 Answer

How to sight in crosman extreme g1 pellet rifle scope


You would sight in an air rifle scope in the same manner as any other standard scope that you might find on a rifle:

You want to secure the rifle as best you can with the sights pointed towards a target, which should be set at the desired distance.

Reduce the error of your sight adjustments either by mounting the rifle in a gun mount or simply resting the stock (not the barrel!) on a solid surface such as a table.

Make sure that the weight of the rifle is carefully supported and the **** is firmly pressed into your shoulder. Looking through the sights, aim at the very center of the target (which for your purposes can be as simple as a piece of paper with a dot drawn in the middle).

Take time to ensure a careful shot, and be sure to avoid any shaking, utilizing the support of the mount/table (try resting the fore-grip of the stock on a roll of paper towels if you're having trouble keeping the rifle steady).

Once you are confident with the placement of the cross-hairs over the center of the target, gently squeeze (don't pull) the trigger.

Determine where the pellet struck the target, and adjust the scope accordingly; while every scope is a little different, the same basic principles for adjustment apply. Unscrew the caps on the top and side of the scope, and carefully read the markings on the adjustment dials.

If the pellet struck low, twist the dial on the top of the scope 'up' (the markings should specify clockwise/counter), and if the pellet struck high, twist in the opposite direction. If the pellet struck to the left or right, follow the same procedure for the dial on the side of the scope.

If the pellet struck low and to the side, make the vertical (up/down) adjustments first, repeat the shot, and only move on to make adjustments left/right once the pellet strikes in vertical alignment with the center of the target.

Take your time, and adjust in increments of only 2-3 clicks to start. Repeat the procedure until the pellets are striking consistently in the center of the target (if you're having a hard time remembering which shot went where, replace the target and continue.

Once you are satisfied with placement of your shot groupings on the targets, replace the dial covers on the scope.

Tips and Notes:
- In order to maintain the accuracy of your rifle, try to avoid resting the rifle on its scope and try to prevent the barrel from contact.

- Take note of your rifle's range, and be aware that the further away you place the target, the less consistent your results will be.

- Be realistic; don't attempt to sight in an air rifle at 50 yards. Remember that even with a rifle that has been professionally sighted, good results still come down to the accuracy of the shooter.

-Sight in your rifle at a range where you are confident in your own abilities; start with a closer target and only move back (i.e. sight in at a greater distance) if necessary.

Further Instruction:
http://www.chuckhawks.com/sight-in_rifle.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLirsAFpsfE

May 05, 2011 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

2 Answers

How do you make adjustments, towards the shot or towards center of the target?


You move the cross hairs to the shot. Set up your gun on a bench and start by firing at a target out at about 15 yards. Once you are "on paper" set your cross hairs on the center and fire a 3 shot group Adjust the scope to the group. if the group is down 3 inch and left 4 inch. Adjust your scope accordingly. Then Fire another 3 shot group, until you are shooting center. Every time you adjust your scope tap the barrel of the scope with a screwdriver handle to keep the cross hairs from sticking. Once on at 15 yards move out to your max range and adjust to that.

Mar 19, 2011 | Brunton 2x20mm NRA Sports Optics Rifle...

1 Answer

Try to ajust up and it shoots side to side


I have given this tip to a dozen people this week. It will save you a ton of ammo. If you don't have a bore sighter of access to one, get a big cardboard box, cut V's in the top that the rifle will sit in nicely, remove the bolt. Find a target, 100 yards away, sight down the bore, tilt box, rifle to target, make sure it doesn't move, adjust scope to the same target. check to see if the rifle is still on, then check the scope again. This will put you on paper at 100 yards.

Feb 17, 2010 | Simmons Optics

1 Answer

Rifle scope with 50 foot paralex needed w/24x+ power


well a fixed scope will be bang on target at 100yds only but off a bit at 50yds a paralex scope will be bang on target what ever the range is as the paralex puts the range right every time wether its a verible or not so if i were you i would go for the paralex scope
and i also do bench rest shooting, with .22,,,357,,,22/250,,,303...7.62/308,,,
up to 1200mtrs!

Jan 12, 2010 | Tasco Target/Varmint 6-24x42mm Rifle Scope...

1 Answer

I think formula in instructions for calculating actual clicks for non-100 yard distances is bogus. upside-down. very very wrong. you know what I mean or should I quote it? not your problem, it's GAMO's....


your wasting your time with them my friend, all they will say is,,,a 177 air rifle shooting over 100 yds?????
you are kidding!
dont bother reading up all the jen, just set out some targets at 5yds apart and shoot at them till you find out just what your rifle's bullet drop is, but at 100yds you may fine your shooting at the sky,,,,

Jan 02, 2010 | Caliber Gamo USA Hunter Elite .177 Air...

1 Answer

I bought a used scope with no manual. On the front of the scope it turns like the back but it has ranges on it do I need to know what range I am shooting for the rifle to be accurite


Take the bolt out of the rifle so you can sight down the barrel to the target. Get the target bullseye in the center of the barrel. Now look through the scope to see where it is. Adjust the windage and elevation screws to get the cross hairs on the bullseye. Look through the barrel several times to make sure the gun did not move off the target during the adjustments. A concrete bench with sandbags is best to use for this.

Dec 05, 2009 | Burris Fullfield II Riflescope

3 Answers

Point of impact changes with every shot


Mount the rifle with the scope and make a mark on the backstop right where the crosshairs are pointed at

Shoot several times, several shots will surley jolt the scope some.

If the crosshairs have moved much past your mark then this would indicate the scope is the issue.

If the crosshairs are still pretty well centered to the mark, its not the scope.

If at the same time your grouping looks terrible, and your scope still is on the mark, and the gun is WELL mounted, then the issue is with the accuracy of the rifle.
Make sure the rifle is mounted good for this to ba accurate .
Hope this helps

Jul 30, 2009 | Tasco Target/Varmint 6-24x42mm Rifle Scope...

1 Answer

Very hard to pump


It needs lubricating. Take it apart, clean it, then put machine oil on the moving parts and seals. If seals are damaged they need replacing. And, please only use it for target shooting.

Apr 30, 2009 | Vacuums

1 Answer

Tasco 6-24x42mm rifle scope parallax adjustment


Here's what you need to know about Mil Dots and rangefinding.

When you look through the scope you should see 5 mil dots on each axis, your scope may have broad lines taking place of the 5th mil dot if it is a "modified" mil dot scope. For measuring purposes, 1 mil is the distance from the center of one dot to the center of the one directly above or below it. 3/4 of a mil is the distance from the top of one dot to the bottom of the one above it, or the "space in between dots". 1/4 mil comprises a single dot, the space between the top of one dot and the bottom of that same dot.

A quick calculation is Size of Target (In Yards) x 1000 / Size of target in mils = Range in Yards

Miliradian or "Mil" is an angular unit of measure, so if you were shooting at 1000 yards and moved up 1 miliradian that would be one inch impact moved up.


Anyway lets say you have a 30" target and we need to find the range... using your scope you place the bottom of the target at the CENTER of a mil dot and count how many mils up, good estimation is key... I'll draw a little text diagram, an asterisk * will be the target top and bottom, and parentheses () will be a mill dot
( * )--------(  )-----*---(  )
Now lets assume the asterisk on the left is the bottom of your target and the one on the right is the top, I put Ten Hyphens in between each dot so if you count from the left you should get about 1.6 Mils. Its real easy to do it in your head, you already know two whole dots is one mil so you just have to estimate whats to the right (or top if you were looking down a scope).

So we know the target is 30" and we have a Mil Reading of 1.6
30/36= .833 so 30" is .833 Yards

So now we can use the equation .833 x 1000 / 1.6 = 520.6 Yards is the distance of the target


Now you can also use Mil dots to do hold over for when the target moves or for wind and elevation but that gets extremely complicated.


Parallax in Rifle Scopes is explained here 
http://www.6mmbr.com/parallax.html


There are many books and websites to confirm what I've said here, but the best way is to go out to your range and talk to some long range shooters and show them your rifle/scope etc and get hands on help.
 

Mar 16, 2009 | Tasco Target/Varmint 6-24x42mm Rifle Scope...

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