Question about Nikon N90S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blank Film Developing

I have a recently purchased Nikon FG and after shooting an experimental roll of film, took it to get developed. However, the film was blank. Any ideas/suggestions? Shot my first roll of Ilford 3200 film. Developed 10:30 min in D-76. Totally clear film including no numbers or film identification. Just a small 2" black tab atone end. ??

Posted by on

  • fixitZ May 11, 2010

    If the film you got has frame numbers and FILM name (KODAK,FUJI) and only blank frames then the camera is at fault like the film did not advance or was not exposed at all.



    If the film you got has no frame number or FILM name then the lab made the mistake of pouring wrong chemisty (FIXER instead of developer) at the wrong time leading to a totally blank film.

×

1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    Scholar:

    An expert who has written 20 answers of more than 400 characters.

  • Expert
  • 185 Answers

Kwilson36

you should have at least 6in. of exposed film from the film canister to the take-up spool unless you loaded the film in total darkness.
open the back cover to make sure the shutter is working, reload and give it another try.

Posted on Jan 30, 2009

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

Why is film clear after developing? Using bulk load Tmaxx 400


Sounds like the camera isn't working. It would appear the shutter doesn't function because you have no images at all. I would open up the camera and check this. (Empty of film of course).

Feb 25, 2015 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Fuji film advance does not work


sounds like the film advance motor died

Feb 12, 2013 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Nikon EM (1979?) Won't wind film, photos don't come out


Not necessarily. The EM has an M90 setting which will fire the shutter at 1/90th of a second. The meter is inactive on this setting. It was put on the EM so that if the batteries fail, you can shoot at 1/90th and take a guess at the exposure. There is also a small button (blue or chrome, depending on the production run) which lights up a red LED if the batteries are good. The light meter doesn't work until the frame counter is at 1 or higher. Before the #1, the shutter will always fire at 1/2000th of a second to speed up the film loading process. You can tell that the meter is working by observing the meter's scale/needle on the inside of the viewfinder. If it is pointing out of the red zone, it's OK to shoot (proper exposure). If the needle is in the red zone (indicating under or over exposure) the camera will "beep" as an audible warning. Check the battery condition first.

Mar 16, 2009 | Nikon EM 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Loaded film blank


Chances are the film had quite a bit of curl to it (often a sign of old film) and it was not pulled over quite far enough during auto loading, or perhaps too far and it had too much slack that the take up reel never grabbed it to advance it thru. You're not the first one this has happened to as the auto load is not as reliable as the older style where you had to load the film leader through a slot in the take up reel.

Dec 19, 2008 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Blank Film Developing


It likely did not catch when it was first loaded, and as such never advanced through the camera. Open the back of the camera, with no film in it, then set the shutter speed to 1, advance the film advance lever and take a shot. You should see the shutter curtains open and then close a second later. Then advance the film lever again and watch to see that the sprockets are turning. If they are, then the camera is exposing and the mechanics are working properly to advance the film. Chances are it was just loaded incorrectly.

Dec 09, 2008 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

2 rolls out of a 3-pack ruined.


I would suggest you buy an off-brand roll of 12 or 24 exposures. Run it through the camera taking snaps of anything -- but make sure you vary the lighting, ISO, shutter speed, aperture, etc. as you snap the pics. Don't worry too much about composition. This roll is a quick test, NOT for photos to keep.

Have the film developed and then follow-up with comments on the results. I'll gladly assist you further at that time.
Char1ieJ

Nov 11, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Pictures did not take


Check for the settings of the camera .Open the back door of the camera now press the button seeing through back, if the shutter opens up and closes everything is correct.
check for the film.

Apr 01, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Developing pictures


depending on the type of film you are using and where you are taking it could be the problem. if you are using professional film and taking it to a pharmacy to get developed, the chemicals used at these places will erase the images off the film and appear as if the film is blank.

Nov 11, 2007 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Bad picture developing


Since this happened on two seperate rolls of film, the problem may be that the shutter blades have been bent out of place.  This can cause the symptoms you describe.  Have a qualified technician look at the shutter.  Usually the blades can be reset.  In bad cases the blades may be bent or creased. If this is the case, the shutter may need to be replaced.

Oct 23, 2007 | Nikon N55 35mm SLR Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Nikon N90S 35mm SLR Camera Logo

Related Topics:

411 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon 35mm SLR Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

96396 Answers

Ric Donato

Level 2 Expert

225 Answers

Bart Pulverman

Level 2 Expert

354 Answers

Are you a Nikon 35mm SLR Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...