Question about Toshiba PDR-M700 Digital Camera

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I press the shutter button a red light flashes in the viewfinder

And a green dot is bracketed on the LCD display. My camera is a PDR M-700 toshiba

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Your focus or lighting is too low for the picture. Add more light, and hold the button down half way to self adjust to see if it goes away. Change the battery to a lithium battery, which helps the digital cameras work their best.
Let me know if this helps.

Posted on Jan 24, 2009

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TROUBLESHOOTING c-750


There are a couple issues related to "slow" that I have with my C-750, and this is how I get around them.

One is the write speed to the xD card. This can prevent you from taking sequential pictures quickly, as the camera displays the current picture it is writing until it finishes. You can make the image of the current picture go away and use your viewfinder again, while the camera is writing the picture, by pressing the shutter button halfway and releasing it. Then you can see your subject in the viewfinder again!

Second is the delay between the time the shutter button is pressed and the time the shutter actually opens (when the camera actually takes the picture). This can be fixed by lining up your shot and pressing the shutter button halfway and holding it for a few seconds. This will give the camera time to adjust and lock focus, shutter speed, etc. There is a small green dot on the display below the battery indicator which will blink a few times when the button is pressed halfway, then remain on steady. When the green dot is steady, the camera is ready. Press the shutter button, and the camera should immediately take the picture.

Nov 12, 2007 | Olympus Camedia C-750 Ultra Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 4. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 4. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Better Focus


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Better Focus


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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1 Answer

Blurry Pictures


There are several factors that can contribute to getting better focus and improved results. 1. Auto Focus / Auto Exposure lock. Press the shutter button down HALF WAY. The camera will attempt to adjust exposure to the current lighting environment for maximum benefit. Then the camera will automatically correct the focus based on objects in the center of the display. If the camera can automatically set the focus and exposure, the LED by the viewfinder will turn GREEN. If the camera can not adjust the settings automatically, the LED will turn RED. This process usually takes about two to three seconds. 2. Be sure not to cover the sensor on the front of the camera with your finger. This will disable the automatic focus and exposure controls. 3. Only us the MACRO MODE (Flower Icon) for CLOSE-UP photography. Be sure to use MACRO MODE if you are taking pictures of an object at less than six inches away. Using MACRO MODE improperly will result in poor focus. 4. Rely on the Rear LCD Display. When in doubt, trust the LCD. The LCD will display the subject more accurately than the viewfinder. This will help with "framing" the subject, or determining if you have enough light for proper exposure. 5. Motion can cause a "blur" effect. Either motion of the subject, or motion by the photographer. This phenomenon is just like traditional photography. Moving objects may appear to blur, and this will be even more evident in lower lighting situations as the shutter speed slows down to allow for more light. The shutter will react faster in bright light, and motion will not be as apparent.

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