Question about Casablanca Fan Stealth 3211T Ceiling

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Scraping sound inside casablanca stealth fan

An momentary metal-on-metal scraping sound only at very slow speed when the fan is starting or stopping. Or when I turn it by hand. Obviously related to the rotation - there is one particular point in the rotation where the scrape occurs. The scraping does not involve the glass or the exterior housing.

The fan is several years old, and I think the fan blades are not perfectly level with the motor housing any more, So until the blades start to "fly" and level themselves out something (flywheel?) is hitting something at one point in the rotation. If I "adjust" the blades by hand to be more level this fixes it - once.

How do I find and fix this for good?

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You need a new flywheel. Go here: http://www.bostonplus.com/parts.html#flywheel

Posted on Jun 19, 2009

  • 1 more comment 
  • Tony Spafford Feb 12, 2011

    I believe this fan has a design flaw. I have talked to service people who allege this -- the thinking is that the blades are too heavy for the design, and consequently fall "out of level", as described above, after a certain number of years (typically when fan is out of warranty, of course!). This flaw necessitates purchase of a new flywheel. I would like to hear from anyone else who has had this same scraping-sound issue, because i have had it happen twice in ten years, and I want to take the matter up with Casablanca, and yo might want to as well. Admittedly the flywheel is only $15.00, plus applicable taxes and/or S

  • keithmcm3 Apr 13, 2014

    I have this same issue. I did correct it by adding small washers to sort of shim the flywheel and the housing but now its back. I have two fans. I only modified one unit about two years ago. Both are making noises now.

  • Karen Sullivan
    Karen Sullivan Jun 06, 2014

    Oh my gosh!! We have this same problem on two of our stelth fans. I just googled scraping noise on fan and I found this. Does anyone know who can install the flywheel? Is it hard to do? Thanks

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    * Even if you don't have a speed control, the motor will still produce an electrical hum -- and the blades, which are physically attached to the motor, serve as mechanical amplifiers -- they take the tiny electrical hum and amplify it just like the big brass funnel speaker on an antique gramophone (record player) takes the tiny vibrations of the needle on the record and amplifies them to a comfortably audible level. High-end fans have a rubber flywheel attached to the motor between the blade holders and the motor unit -- and since rubber doesn't transmit vibrations well, this effectively deadens the sound. Your fan doesn't have one of these, but you can effectively replicate the noise-dampening effect by putting rubber washers between where the blade holders touch the bottom of the motor AND between where the screws which hold the blade holders onto the motor, meet the blade holders themselves. This will completely remove the path along which the sound vibrations can flow to the blades, and thus your hum will stop.

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