Question about Eaton Corporation BR2100 Circuit Breaker

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Need information on circuit breaker BR2100 60amp

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Hi - I'm an electrician and can help you with your question.

A BR2100 circuit breaker is a 2 Pole 100 Amp (for the part number "BR2100", the "2" indicates the number of poles and the "100" indicates the amperage) circuit breaker. It can be installed in a single phase or three phase 120/240 VAC system panel that specifically lists the BR series breakers as acceptable for use.

A BR260 A BR2100 circuit breaker is a 2 Pole 60 Amp (the part number BR260, the "2" indicates the number of poles and the "60" indicates the amperage) circuit breaker. It can be installed in a single phase or three phase 120/240 VAC system panel that specifically lists the BR series breakers as acceptable for use.

It is not possible to have a BR2100 rated for 60 amps, 1 or 3 poles, or a BR260 rated for 100 amps, 1 or 3 poles.

It is not permissible to install any circuit breaker brand or type in any panel that does not specifically include it on a list of acceptable circuit breakers.

Circuit breakers are designed to carry 80% of the amperage rating.
To determine the load a circuit breaker can carry, multiply the circuit breaker amp rating by 80%.
This means that if you need to supply more than 80 amps, you cannot use a 100 amp circuit breaker. A higher rating is required. A BR2110 would be acceptable for loads greater than 80 amps, but less than 88 amps because the formula above says: 110 amp x 80% = 88 amps.

To determine the breaker size, determine the load (by measuring with a meter or obtaining amp rating of the load from the data plate) and multiply it by 125%. Using the same numbers in the example above; assume an 88 amp load. 88 amps x 125% = 110 amp circuit breaker. The 60 amp breaker is acceptable for up to 48 amps because 60amps x 80% = 48 amps. A 48 amp load needs a 60 amp breaker because 48 amps x 125% = 60 amps.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Posted on Jan 17, 2013

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http://waterheatertimer.org/images/Inside-Main-Breaker-Box-10-1000.jpg
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