Question about Cambridge Audio Azur 640A Amplifier

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No sound, no cap warnings

My 640a V2 died yesterday. No sound over speakers, with headphones I hear only crackling noises which somewhat resemble the playing track. The CAP5 projection LED does not light up. Symptoms: - the amp used to click twice when turned on, now it only clicks once - when turned on, there were blue LEDs flashing from Aux (leftmost) to TapeMon (rightmost) and back. Now its only from CD (2nd from the left) to TapeMon and back. - when I try to switch inputs from A to B sometimes the LED of A fades but that of B does not turn on, sometimes both turn on. - a faint 'burned' smell Looks serious to me, but I have not clue about electronics. Does anyone know what the problem could be / what part is likely the problem or should I just send it to CA? thanks!

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: Using a tube pre amp with my CA Azur 640A?

There are many answers to your questions but Ill have a go with the basics...
Audio connections should be matched.... its called Frequency impedance,.... to get a signal along wires or cables (or Fibre) the Impedance of the cables and wires must be matched to the device they are connected to transfer the signal along the cables without distortion...

Manufacturers provide many sockets on the input side of amplifiers and preamplifiers to allow the consumer to connect various devices of different impedance.

They label these inputs like CD, or Tuner, or PHONO etc etc,

That means if you have a CD player it must be plugged into the CD input socket then the impedance will be correct and the sound will transfer along the CD cables correctly, without distortion..same with the Phono input etc...
You will find on the sound output to the speakers terminals are also labelled 4-6ohm, or 8-10ohm, these are the impedance expected for the coil ratings of the speakers them selves and its important to get the correct speakers to the correct out put terminals...

In your case all you have to do is follow these simple rules and all will be well....you say you have a squeeze box well there probably isnt a port labelled squeeze box so you need to experiment and try out each input port for the squeeze box to see what input gives you the correct sound output...Watch the Phono inputs as these are very sensative to input sound levels and must be treated very carefully as they have a double stage of sound amplification and as such you need to have the volume right down when connecting up the Phono inputs then increase the volume carefully after the cable connections are completed.

If you follow these rules then all will be well,,,,there is no difference if the Pre amp or Power amp is valve or transistor or FET or has IC outputs to the speaker the same impedance rules apply..just treat it as a box with input and output terminals and all the impedance will be taken care of for you...if you read the lables...

You need to connect you signal source to the Preamp inputs the out put from the Preamp connects to the power amp input then the power amp output goes to the speakers. this is a basic configuration for sound systems, there are other variations but are outside this discussion.

Cheers From YUBEUT

Posted on Nov 16, 2007

  • 31 Answers

SOURCE: Loss of sound Azur 640A

This is a classic dry joint,,,,,,,,When a box of electronics is assembled thousands of soldered connections are made, to connect all the components together correctly.

During this soldering process a special FLUX is used to ensure the components are electrically connected correctly and reliably....sometime this FLUX creates an air bubble and over time this bubble causes the outside air to corrode the electrical connection and thus the minute electrical voltages cannot pass though this connection correctly....

When you turn on... electricity and heat are generated just enough to allow the voltages to get through the faulty joint...
thats why the sound is weak and changing in intensity...

This fault needs to be located and resoldered. Its not an easy task to locate it... but the resoldering takes only 5 seconds,,,,but as you can imagine searching for it can be time consuming....
You will need a circuit diagram of the amp and some nowledge of the audio path from input to output to search effectively...
But please check your speaker wires very carefully as maybe the simplest thing is causing this problem!!!!!

Cheers From YUBEUT

Posted on Nov 16, 2007

petraman7
  • 1175 Answers

SOURCE: my azur 540a/640a v2.0 amplifier is not working.

I agree with hallsteve.
One or both of the output sections is blown.
What part of the country do you live?
I may be able to suggest someone.

Posted on Jan 22, 2009

technical114
  • 1851 Answers

SOURCE: Hello,

Why don't you try using the main outputs (the 2 XLR connectors). With 2 cables connect these two (left - right) outputs at your amplifier's aux in. In that case take care that the "output level" of the mixer works like master volume controlfor the signal that the mixer sends to the amplifier.

In case of a problem or clarification, don't hesitate to post.

Thanks and regards
Please kindly rate this solution
Stelios

Posted on Feb 25, 2010

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