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What types of snowboard should I get? - Winter Sports

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There are generally 2 types of snowboards: Freestyle/All-Mountain and Alpine Gear. If you are a beginner or just snowboard for fun then it is recommended that you will get the first kind. The alpine gear snowboards are for professionals and advanced snowboarders.

Posted on Jan 14, 2013

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"There are Three Different Types of Snowboards available on the market today: Freestyle, Freeride (All Mountain), and Alpine (Carving) Boards. Each board has a unique construction technique and materials, shape, flex pattern, and size. The type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to your particular style of riding. Freeride or All Mountain Board Freeride or All Mountain Snowboard Of the three Snowboard types, the Freeride Snowboard is the most popular. Accounting for half of all Snowboard sales, this type of board is a good all-mountain, park and Halfpipe Snowboard that is designed to float well in Powder Surface. You can enjoy carving, catching air, and basically all riding aspects with this type of Snowboard. Freeride boards have a directional shape and are meant to be ridden primarily in one direction. Having a directional shape means that the Snowboard's tip is different from its tail. In freeride, the tail is generally more narrow, shorter, and flatter than the tip of the board. With this, the stance on freeride boards is usually offset toward the tail of the board. Still, freeride boards can be ridden Fakie, despite their directional shape. Freeride Snowboards are usually fairly soft and maneuverable enough for beginners, but stiff enough to hold a fast turn in hard snow. This type of Snowboard bridges the gap between Freestyle and Alpine carving. However, it isn't as stable as a carving board and it isn't as agile as a freestyle board. Freestyle Snowboard Freestyle Snowboard A Freestyle Snowboard is wider, more stable, and more forgiving to ride. Also, it is shorter, lighter and (compared with a freeride board) softer in flex, which makes it easier to turn. These characteristics make a freestyle board very responsive to the rider. Consequently, it is the best choice for the beginner. These boards are built mainly for performing tricks in terrain parks and halfpipes (e.g. spins, air, grabs and riding fakie). Still, Freestyle Snowboards have limited edge grip and stability, and are not good for carving turns or cruising fast. Most Freestyle Snowboards are either twin tip boards or directional-twin. Twin tip boards have a centered stance with a tip and tail that are exact copies of each other, making them symmetrical in shape. Both ends of a freestyle Snowboard have a shovel, and freestyle boards with twin tip design makes it easy for beginners to ride both forward and backward (fakie). Directional-twin Snowboards are similar to the regular twin tip Snowboard; only, its tail is stiffer than the nose. Carving, Alpine, or Race Board Carving or Alpine Snowboard Carving Snowboards are narrower than freestyle and freeride boards. Their long, narrow, stiff constructions are configured for higher speeds and cleaner carved turns. With this, carving boards allow quick edge turns, swift, superior edge-holding power on hard snow, and good stability for speed. Also known as alpine boards, these snowboards almost look like an enlarged Ski. They are made in both symmetrical and asymmetrical styles and tend to only have a shovel on the nose. Similar with freeride boards, carving boards are made to ride only in one direction. While carving boards offer a higher level of performance, they are more difficult for the beginning rider to use and are generally reserved for more advanced riders. Alpine Snowboards are mainly preferred by Snowboard racers for a great day of fresh unridden powder. Keep in mind that alpine Snowboards are configured for riding and carving downhill, not for doing tricks. To summarize, freestyle, freeride, and alpine or carving Snowboards are the three basic types of Snowboards. It is easier to maneuver a soft-flexing, twin-tip, gradual side cut Freestyle Snowboard. On the other hand, it is harder to maneuver a stiffer-flex, directional, aggressive sidecut All-Mountain Snowboard with scores of combinations in between. Always remember that the type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to the type of riding that you like to do, and that both Freestyle and Freeride boards are good Snowboard types for beginning snowboarders."

Posted on Dec 01, 2008

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What is the best snowboard?


Well, it depends... I can tell you that Snowboarders magazine rated BURTON NUG as #1 snowboard for men for 2012 while Apple & Kiwi rated DC Ply as #1. You can also try the following to read some more reviews: http://snowboard.findthebest.com/

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Strings are gettin frayed and about to break... where can i get new ones or is there something else that i can use instead.. i have lamar liftie snowboard boots.. is there a metal type of...


just get a pair of any long shoelaces they will be fine. mine have broke and went to like an atheletic store and got a pair of shoelaces. but if you want durable try ice hockey skate laces. please note snowboarding , weather, etc will always ware your gear down and out. its not uncommon for the laces to break. I hope this helps

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What fit is this type of snowboard pants?


Call me crazy but most Snowboard pants as of yet don't have a separate "fit". That means you won't have any described as"loose", "baggy" "straight leg" etc. What you have instead is that snowboarding pants are made w/ space and flex @ the knees and are wide enough for boots @ the ends. Any adjustment to "fit would have to made in choosing what size you planned on wearing. Hence if you wanted em "baggy" get em bigger etc...

Aug 11, 2010 | Burton 3L Snowboard Pants Optic Del Jaq...

1 Answer

What does the number mean in the base measurement of snowboards?


It is the type of sintered base used on the board - the higher numbers indicate higher density and pressure used to make the base material - the better base will have more "pores" and will hold the wax better resulting in a faster board

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

1 Answer

What does the number mean in the base measurement of snowboards?


It is the type of sintered base used on the board - the higher numbers indicate higher density and pressure used to make the base material - the better base will have more "pores" and will hold the wax better resulting in a faster board

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

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Is there a different type of bindings for each type of riding?


Technical freestyle This type of rider is most often found on the lower elevations of the mountain, hiking the halfpipe or riding in the snowboard park. Many of today's technical freestyle riders come to snowboarding with experience as a skateboarder, in-line skater, BMX, or other action sports background. While the equipment specific to this type of rider excels in park and pipe riding, it can also be very versatile across the whole mountain at less than full-speed. * Technical freestyle bindings o Technical freestyle bindings generally use a low hiback with 2 straps for increased flexibility and range of motion o These bindings are not usually value/price driven o Most technical freestyle bindings (either step-in or strap) are made of composite materials in vibrant colors o Riders generally gain responsiveness with a minimal weight gain Freeride While an overused term in snowboarding, freeride is still the best way to describe the majority of snowboarders and soon-to-be snowboarders. As it suggests, freeride describes a user who intends to utilize the whole mountain. These riders enjoy everything about snowboarding: the amazing feel of carving a turn on freshly groomed slopes, the sense of flight obtained at lift-off from the big-air jump, the creativity that can only be understood descending the half-pipe, and the feel of freedom one gets floating in fresh powder. * Freeride bindings o Freeride bindings generally have higher hiback with 2 or 3 straps for added support and control o These bindings come in every shape, color, and price o For the most part, no matter what the specifics of each freeride binding, the general effect on the riding experience is minimal. This holds true for both traditional/strap bindings and Step-In bindings. o Binding choice is commonly a packaging decision or one of brand/price/graphics Freecarve This type of riding style is one of the fastest growing segments within the snowboarding world. Commonly referred to as "cross-over," a majority of these riders were once skiers. A freecarve rider enjoys the full-length and width a mountain has to offer, continually transitioning from one turn to the next. * Freecarve bindings o As with freecarve boots, there are very few freecarve bindings o Those that are freecarve specific can usually be distinguished by their third strap o Step-In bindings are also available in a freecarve configuration, and are almost always manufactured from space-age composites Alpine/Race Alpine/Race riders are easily picked out of the crowd. They are always seen on groomed trails, laying a trench in the snow with each turn. These riders use a snowboards edge like no other rider. Using powerful body movements and gravity as their friend, alpine riders enjoy the sport only when they are connected to the snow. * Alpine/Race bindings o Alpine/Race bindings are usually a plate binding with hard boots o Metal and composites are the only available materials for this type of binding

Dec 01, 2008 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

1 Answer

Snowboarding skill level


In Snowboarding, the skill level is divided into three types: * Newbie - from total beginner to having a few days of riding experience * Intermediate - comfortable with common riding techniques and starting to try tricks * Advanced - comfortable with riding all pistes and off slope; advanced tricks and skills"

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

1 Answer

Snowboard type or styles


"There are Three Different Types of Snowboards available on the market today: Freestyle, Freeride (All Mountain), and Alpine (Carving) Boards. Each board has a unique construction technique and materials, shape, flex pattern, and size. The type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to your particular style of riding. Freeride or All Mountain Board Freeride or All Mountain Snowboard Of the three Snowboard types, the Freeride Snowboard is the most popular. Accounting for half of all Snowboard sales, this type of board is a good all-mountain, park and Halfpipe Snowboard that is designed to float well in Powder Surface. You can enjoy carving, catching air, and basically all riding aspects with this type of Snowboard. Freeride boards have a directional shape and are meant to be ridden primarily in one direction. Having a directional shape means that the Snowboard's tip is different from its tail. In freeride, the tail is generally more narrow, shorter, and flatter than the tip of the board. With this, the stance on freeride boards is usually offset toward the tail of the board. Still, freeride boards can be ridden Fakie, despite their directional shape. Freeride Snowboards are usually fairly soft and maneuverable enough for beginners, but stiff enough to hold a fast turn in hard snow. This type of Snowboard bridges the gap between Freestyle and Alpine carving. However, it isn't as stable as a carving board and it isn't as agile as a freestyle board. Freestyle Snowboard Freestyle Snowboard A Freestyle Snowboard is wider, more stable, and more forgiving to ride. Also, it is shorter, lighter and (compared with a freeride board) softer in flex, which makes it easier to turn. These characteristics make a freestyle board very responsive to the rider. Consequently, it is the best choice for the beginner. These boards are built mainly for performing tricks in terrain parks and halfpipes (e.g. spins, air, grabs and riding fakie). Still, Freestyle Snowboards have limited edge grip and stability, and are not good for carving turns or cruising fast. Most Freestyle Snowboards are either twin tip boards or directional-twin. Twin tip boards have a centered stance with a tip and tail that are exact copies of each other, making them symmetrical in shape. Both ends of a freestyle Snowboard have a shovel, and freestyle boards with twin tip design makes it easy for beginners to ride both forward and backward (fakie). Directional-twin Snowboards are similar to the regular twin tip Snowboard; only, its tail is stiffer than the nose. Carving, Alpine, or Race Board Carving or Alpine Snowboard Carving Snowboards are narrower than freestyle and freeride boards. Their long, narrow, stiff constructions are configured for higher speeds and cleaner carved turns. With this, carving boards allow quick edge turns, swift, superior edge-holding power on hard snow, and good stability for speed. Also known as alpine boards, these snowboards almost look like an enlarged Ski. They are made in both symmetrical and asymmetrical styles and tend to only have a shovel on the nose. Similar with freeride boards, carving boards are made to ride only in one direction. While carving boards offer a higher level of performance, they are more difficult for the beginning rider to use and are generally reserved for more advanced riders. Alpine Snowboards are mainly preferred by Snowboard racers for a great day of fresh unridden powder. Keep in mind that alpine Snowboards are configured for riding and carving downhill, not for doing tricks. To summarize, freestyle, freeride, and alpine or carving Snowboards are the three basic types of Snowboards. It is easier to maneuver a soft-flexing, twin-tip, gradual side cut Freestyle Snowboard. On the other hand, it is harder to maneuver a stiffer-flex, directional, aggressive sidecut All-Mountain Snowboard with scores of combinations in between. Always remember that the type of Snowboard you ride should correspond to the type of riding that you like to do, and that both Freestyle and Freeride boards are good Snowboard types for beginning snowboarders."

Dec 01, 2008 | All Star Forum Star Women's Snowboard

3 Answers

Snowboard boot type


"Snowboard Boots - Function and Types of Snowboarding Boots Good Snowboard Boots should give you maximum control over your Snowboard, protect your feet and ankles from the pressures of high speed turns, and keep your feet warm and breathing in all weather conditions at the same time. Boots come in many variations and Styles. There are Different Types of Snowboard Boots appropriate for the Three Riding Styles in Snowboarding. Currently, a lot of boarders prefer soft boots with Strap Snowboard Bindings, but step-ins are a convenient alternative. What follows are descriptions of the most common types of Snowboard Boots: Soft Boots Softboot Soft Boots are most comfortable and can be used with highback bindings and flow-in bindings. This type of Snowboard Boots allows for a large amount of movement in just about any direction. Consequently, soft boots are a must for pulling tricks since they are great for doing whatever you want. Soft Boots consist of two parts: an inner bladder and an outer boot. The inner bladder is padded to keep your feet warm, dry and protected from heavy impacts. It usually has its own lacing so you can tighten the inner bladder independently from the outer boot. The outer boot has a sturdy upper part that allows for ankle movement. The outer lacing allows you to further tighten the Boots. In contrast to Hard Boots and Ski Boots, Soft Boots are pretty comfortable for walking and even driving your car when you're not on the board. Soft Boots are currently the Most Popular Type of Snowboard Boots and are preferred by Freestylers and Freeriders. Although there is a wide range of Soft Boot Styles for both Freestyle and Freeride Snowboarding, the main difference in the different styles is in the degree of Boot Flex. Soft Boots with a stiffer upper boot and a higher cuff with a lace-up inner boot for enhanced firmness are Freeride Soft Boot Styles. Conversely, Soft Boots with loose, molded-foam inner boots for more flexibility are Freestyle Soft Boots. Hard Boots Hardboot This Type of Snowboard Boots is designed for precise control. Hard Boots support your foot, ankle, and lower leg firmly, making them best for racing and high-speed carving on hard snow. Hard Boots have a padded inner bladder similar to the ones in Soft Boots. The outer shell however is made out of hard plastic and is usually adjusted (or closed) using buckles or ratchet bails. The benefit of having hard plastic as an outer shell is that it gives riders more precision and power in edging movements. Hard Boots resemble the traditional Ski Boots. However, the Hard Boots have lateral mobility for the ankle. To provide some flexibility, hinges are often built into the ankles. The soles of Hard Boots usually have a mechanism that allows them to be connected to Plate Bindings. Hard Boots are often used with plate bindings by Alpine Racers who want their movement to be directly transferred from the Hard Boots and Snowboard Bindings onto the Snowboard. On the contrary, Hard Boots are not suitable for Freestyle Snowboarding tricks and maneuvers since they limit the amount of flexibility. This Type of Snowboard Boots is pretty specific and seriously lessens your freedom in choice. If you're planning to buy this, make sure you find an exact match between the Binding Mechanism and the Hard Boot Mechanism. Also, make sure you can flex the Hard Boot forward easily and smoothly so as to avoid mishaps during transitions. Hybrid Step-In Boots Hybrid boot These Snowboard Boots are a good choice for those who want the convenience of a strapless system. Hybrid Step-in Boots combine the flexible, soft upper part of Soft Boots and the sturdy hard soles of Hard Boots. They are used in combination with Step-in Bindings. People who are looking for a mix between the comfort and flexibility of Soft Boots and the control of Hard Boots will often opt for Hybrid Step-in Boots. As with Hard Boots, you will need to find a match between the Step-in Binding mechanism and the Boot mechanism. Before you buy Snowboard Boots, you must first decide whether you want to go with a Step-in Binding or a traditional Strap Binding. Remember, while traditional Strap Bindings will work with any non-Step-in Boots, Step-in Boots must be purchased together with their corresponding Bindings. Also, keep in mind that Hard Boot systems work best in harder snow conditions, while soft boot systems work best in softer conditions. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Kicker Forum SLR Snowboard Boots

1 Answer

Snowboard bindings types


"Strap Bindings Highback Bindings The Strap Bindings is the original and still the most popular Binding System in Snowboarding. This is because Strap Bindings are not only adjustable and very secure, they are also comfortable. Nowadays, this Type of Bindings is designed to be lighter and stronger. Strap Bindings consists of a contoured baseplate where a rider can place his Soft Boots upon. At the back of the baseplate is a vertical plate (the highback) that rises behind your ankles and lower calves. The highbacks on Snowboard Bindings secure the heel of your feet and the backside of your lower legs. It also helps you to force the heel side edge of the board into the Snow Surface and brings the toe side of the board up. At the front of the binding are two or three adjustable straps which can be used to secure the front side of your feet and ankles to the Snowboard. Initially, you may have to sit down to strap in, but with a bit of practice, it'll be easier to strap in while standing. Strap Bindings can differ in the number of straps, the shape of the base, and highback plate. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Most people go for these kinds of bindings as they are more common, offer excellent control, and offer more options when it comes to boots-bindings combinations. The combination of the highback plate and the front side straps gives great control. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Soft Boots. As the Binding gives all the support needed, the Snowboard Boots can remain soft and comfortable. Keep in mind that the Best Strap Bindings have ample amounts of wide padding at the toe and ankle straps. Step-In Bindings Step In Bindings It is quite hard to get into Strap Bindings since you need to loosen and tighten the straps every time you get into and out of your bindings. This is why Step-in Bindings were developed. This Type of Snowboard Bindings allow you to simply step down and click into it, thus making it easier for you to get on and off your snowboard. With this feature, Step-in Binding Systems have become quite popular with rental shops because they often give the beginners fewer Snowboard Equipment to fuss with. Still, while Step-In Bindings give you additional speed and can save you from a load of hassle, you pay for these conveniences when it comes to snowboard control. Step-in Bindings don't have any straps to give additional support, making the Snowboard Boot less flexible, and thus, harder to do Snowboarding Tricks. So make sure you get a good fit if you're planning to buy this. Step-in Bindings usually work in combination with soft boots which are somewhat stiffer than those used with highback bindings. When you opt for Step-in Bindings, you narrow your selection in choosing Snowboard Boots and Bindings since they both have to be ""step-ins"". However, there are some higher and more advanced Step-in Bindings out on the market that provide the best of both worlds. Step-ins can be used for either Freeride or Freestyle riders. Cross-over skiers will often feel comfortable with Step-in Bindings and boots since they are used to stepping in and to harder boots and just turning a switch or a latch whenever they want to get out. Flow-In Bindings Flow In Bindings Flow-In Bindings is quite new and is a hybrid of the step-in and strap systems. This Type of Snowboard Bindings tries to combine the control of Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-in Bindings. Flow-In Bindings look rather similar to Strap Bindings and also allow you to use soft boots. The notable difference is that, unlike the two or three straps that cover the top of your feet in Strap Bindings, the Flow-in Bindings have only one large tongue that covers a large part of the top of your Snowboard Boot. Getting into and out of your Bindings is a matter of flipping the highback backwards and entering or exiting your boot. Flow-in Bindings are becoming more popular as the choices and Techniques of Snowboarding improve. People love the Flow-in System as it combines all the advantages of the Strap Bindings with the ease of Step-ins. One disadvantage however is that Flow-in Bindings are more difficult to adjust than strap-ons. Plate Bindings Plate Bindings Plate Bindings, also known as Hard-Boot Bindings, consist of a hard baseplate, steel bails, and a heel or toe lever. This Type of Bindings is used in combination with Hard Boots that can be inserted into the bails. By flipping the lever, the boots are strapped firmly into the Bindings. The features of the Plate Bindings are the closest to a traditional Ski Binding and their rigid responsiveness provides maximum leverage and power for high-speed carving and riding on hard snow. Plate Bindings and hard boots are mostly preferred by Alpine Racers who need the extra edge control that they get from this combination. Baseless Bindings This Type of Bindings was introduced in the mid 1990's by several companies. In Baseless Bindings, the sole of the Snowboard Boot is placed in direct contact with the Snowboard deck by removing the Binding's baseplate. With this, the sole height is lowered by up to 1/8 of an inch. Theoretically, using the Baseless Bindings enhances the ""feel"" of your Snowboard's flex. However, this Type of Snowboard Bindings aggravates ""toe drag"" problems for people with large feet. Also, most Baseless Bindings are far more difficult to adjust (stance angle/width) than traditional ""4x4"" designs. Still, Halfpipe and park riders prefer Baseless Bindings because it provides them with a quicker edge response. The choice of what Type of Snowboard Bindings to use usually comes down to personal preference and finding the right Snowboard Boot first. If you feel that the convenience of stepping in outweighs the additional control you can gain, then it is best to go for that particular Style of Binding. Regardless of which Type of Binding System you wind up with, don't head for the slopes until you know exactly how to get in and out of them. With or Without Highbacks? The large curved piece of plastic screwed to the base of the binding is the Highback. Its main function is to give riders some control over their Snowboard's Heel Edge. These can be found on all Bindings or are built into the boot with some Step-in Systems. Alpine riders who need to perform high speed turns will prefer taller and stiffer Highbacks for greater control and improved edge control. On the other hand, Freestylers will want a shorter backplate for more flexibility and turning power. Snowboard Boots and Bindings form a combination wherein not all Kinds of Bindings are suited for each type of Snowboard Boot. It is often best to buy them together. In here, knowing your intended Snowboarding Style is crucial before buying a combination of boots and bindings. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Flow M9 Snowboard Binding

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